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Pain from rejection and physical pain may not be so similar after all Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted [...]The post Pain from rejection and physical pain may not be so similar after all appeared first on PsyPost.
Penn-led team prevents memory problems caused by sleep deprivation Sleep is a critical period for memory consolidation, and most people don’t get enough. Research has shown that even brief periods of sleep deprivation can lead to deficits in memory formation. In a new study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania found that a particular [...]The post Penn-led team prevents memory problems caused by sleep deprivation appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists prevent memory problems caused by sleep deprivation Scientists have found that a particular set of cells in a small region of the brain are responsible for memory problems after sleep loss. By selectively increasing levels of a signaling molecule in these cells, the researchers prevented mice from having memory deficits.
Seniors draw on extra brainpower for shopping Holiday shopping can be mentally exhausting for anyone. But a new study finds that older adults seem to need extra brainpower to make shopping decisions -- especially ones that rely on memory. The study suggests that older shoppers draw on resources from an additional brain area to remember competing consumer products and choose the better one.
Songbirds help scientists develop cooling technique to safely map human brain A new diagnostic technique — resulting from monitoring thousands of courtship calls from songbirds — can be used to safely map the human brain during complex neurosurgery, according to research.
Riding Out the Blips Living with schizophrenia is like driving across the country. There are meandering fields and prairies of months when you’re well that almost make you forget you have an illness. Then you come into the mountains and the roads get curvy and steep and the weather gets unpredictable. One minute you...
Youths with a family history of substance use disorders have less efficient forebrain Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders have a greater risk of developing substance-use disorders (SUDs) themselves than their peers with no such family histories. A new study examines forebrain activity in youths with and without a family history of SUDs. Findings indicate that youths with a family history have forebrain regions that function less efficiently.
Chronic alcohol intake can damage white matter pathways across entire brain Chronic misuse of alcohol results in measurable damage to the brain. A new study uses high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans to compare the brains of individuals with a history of alcoholism versus those of healthy light drinkers. The abstinent alcoholics showed pronounced reductions in frontal and superior white matter tracts.
Jonestown: What Happened? On November 18, 1978, 913 U.S. citizens died in the jungle of Guyana in what is usually described as mass suicide. The most simplified version of the telling, the one that most people first encounter when hearing of the event, is that over 900 people lined up quietly and quaffed...
Don’t Fall Off the Physics Bus! My kids attended Indian Springs School in Birmingham, Alabama, where their wonderful physics teacher started off every school year with his infamous warning: Don’t fall off the physics bus! He was playfully reminding students that physics is a cumulative subject, in which you’ve got to make sure and master the material all along the...
Overweight and Invisible- part1 Eating disorders are more dangerous than they appear. The apparent issues, are not the issues: “appearance,” “nutrition,” “calories,” “popularity,” or the lack thereof. The real issue for many is control. “I may not be able to control much in my life, but I can control my food intake!” With time,...
The Prices You Pay for Winning an Argument  One of the widely held beliefs that threaten relationships is the idea that being victorious in an argument is a good thing. That notion is based in part on the assumption that when it comes to arguments, there are only two possible outcomes: winning or losing. It’s a zero sum...
The Surprisingly Simple Secret To Getting Smarter Faster The big difference between fast and slow learners is that fast learners are brave good sports, able to give up their hard-earned assumptions when they aren't working. They don't waste time flogging dead hobbyhorses. No matter what you're trying to learn, be a good sport not a sore loser and you'll get smarter faster.
Ethical Parenting: Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity “No social problem is as universal as the oppression of the child…No slave was ever so much the property of his master as the child is of his parent…Never were the rights of man ever so disregarded as in the case of the child.” ~ Maria Montessori. Principle E asks...
Pain from rejection, physical pain may not be so similar after all Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact.
Have Patience! When you lack patience, you feel upset, anxious, tense, irritated, nervous, frustrated, out of control, ill-tempered, rushed, and often ignored. When you have patience, you feel calm, peaceful, tolerant, content, accepting, compassionate, and often relaxed. You choose.
Mothers comforting babies in pain actually changes the gene activity in infants’ brains Study on rats show that hundreds of genes in baby rats' brains were more or less active, depending on whether the mothers were present while the babies were in pain.
Musicians show advantages in long-term memory Psychologists have demonstrated a link between musical training and long-term memory advantages.
Mother's soothing presence makes pain go away, changes gene activity in infant brain A mother's 'TLC' not only can help soothe pain in infants, but it may also impact early brain development by altering gene activity in a part of the brain involved in emotions, according to a new study.
The Silent Treatment And What You Can Do To The silent treatment is a favorite abusive tactic of infantile narcissists and bullies. What can you do about it?...