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Self-reported sleep disturbances linked to higher risk for Alzheimer's disease in men Elderly men with self-reported sleep disturbances run a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than men without self-reported sleep disturbances, studies show. The researchers followed more than 1,000 men, who were initially 50 year old, between the years 1970 and 2010. The results of the study show that self-reported sleep disturbances were linked to an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease during the 40-year follow-up period, particularly if they occurred late in life.
Does having children make us any happier? The birth of a first and a second child briefly increases the level of their parents’ happiness, but a third does not, according to new research. Those who have children at an older age or who are more educated have a particularly positive response to a first birth. Older parents, between the ages of 35 -- 49, have the strongest happiness gains around the time of birth and stay at a higher level of happiness after becoming parents, the research indicates.
Preventative action prior to brain surgery: Ultra-high-field MRI reveals language centers in brain in much more detail It is now possible, for the first time, to demonstrate that the areas of the brain that are important for understanding language can be pinpointed much more accurately using ultra-high-field MRI (7 Tesla) than with conventional clinical MRI scanners. This research helps to protect these areas more effectively during brain surgery and avoid accidentally damaging it.
The Most Important Factor For Surviving a Zombie Apocalypse When the zombie uprising begins, will you be ready? More importantly, do you know what the most important thing is to being ready? Surrounding yourself with trusted people is the best way to survive the zombie apocalypse.
A Banality If we know how to, we love our kids (which is a big “if” (since many of us weren’t loved or were not loved “right”)). They take that love and, hopefully, pass it on (a big “hopefully” since they are so many matching and existential variables involved). That’s how the...
Best of Our Blogs: October 28, 2014 Whenever I’m on a desperate hunt for something whether it be compassion, validation or even a piece of cake, it’s helpful to dig deep. The solution is often less about what I need externally and more about focusing on what I need emotionally. If I’m not getting enough compassion for...
5 Strategies to Decrease Loneliness When You Have I’ve been in private practice for just about a year now and it’s been an amazing experience.  I actually feel more connected to others through my work now than I’ve ever felt before.  However, throughout this time I’ve heard many other therapists with a private practice talk about how lonely...
Jealousy over “Stupid Things” Is Not a Sign of Love A common misconception is that jealousy is a sign of love. But suspicious jealousy is more about insecurity than love. What does research tell us about the nature of jealousy and how we can cope with it in our own relationships?
You'll Be Glad This Mind Control Handbook Doesn't Exist Or Does It? Behold the cover to The Person's Guide to Ritual & Invasive Mind Control, a book that purports to teach you how to "filch people's thoughts & manipulate their memories via the nasal cavity."...
#122 Shades of Creativity We’ve been talking about the uncanny ways in which important people—mainly parents—transmit the essence of who they are in ways that defy description. We find ourselves doing and saying and feeling things that are reminiscent of our parents, sometimes without realizing that we are doing it. Today I want to...
First atlas of body clock gene expression informs timing of drug delivery A new effort mapping 24-hr patterns of expression for thousands of genes in 12 different mouse organs – five years in the making – provides important clues about how the role of timing may influence the way drugs work in the body. A study detailing this veritable “atlas” of gene oscillations, never before described in [...]The post First atlas of body clock gene expression informs timing of drug delivery appeared first on PsyPost.
Vaccines don’t cause autism, but air pollution might The post Vaccines don’t cause autism, but air pollution might appeared first on PsyPost.
Stop Looking for a ‘Soulmate’ and Start Looking for Still looking for your perfect mate? You may have already found them. Soulmates can be defined in many different ways. Most of us search high and low for many years, braving the ups and downs of relationships and love, wondering if we are with our soulmate or if such a...
The Real Reason You Get Attracted To People Who Relationships aren’t just about togetherness and connection. They are also about the spaces of separateness. While togetherness time promotes greater understanding and connection between both partners, the times between experiences of connection are just as important to the health and sustainment of the relationship. When partners are together, they naturally...
Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in brain disease New work by a pioneering scientist details how subtle changes in mitochondrial function may cause a broad range of common metabolic and degenerative diseases. Mitochondria are tiny energy-producing structures within our cells that contain their own DNA. The new research shows that small changes in the ratio of mutant to normal mitochondrial DNA within the [...]The post Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in brain disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Synapses always on the starting blocks While neurons rapidly propagate information in their interior via electrical signals, they communicate with each other at special contact points known as the synapses. Chemical messenger substances, the neurotransmitters, are stored in vesicles at the synapses. When a synapse becomes active, some of these vesicles fuse with the cell membrane and release their contents. To [...]The post Synapses always on the starting blocks appeared first on PsyPost.
The Beast Is Back: Depression Part III Well, I guess the antidepressant is starting to work cause I made it out for the first time in a long time. Manic, no, but I ended up at a club by myself at a hip hop party. Awesome. I sat at the bar and took in the scene and...
Prescriptions Without Meds for Anger, Depression and Anxiety Much has been written of late of the downsides of psychotropic medications. Here's a set of alternatives to taking pills to combat anger, anxiety and depression, the Big Three of negative emotional states.
Traumatic brain injury associated with increased dementia risk in older adults Traumatic brain injury appears to be associated with an increased risk of dementia in adults 55 years and older, according to a study. "Whether a person with TBI recovers cognitively or develops dementia is likely dependent on multiple additional risk and protective factors, ranging from genetics and medical comorbidities to environmental exposures and specific characteristics of the TBI itself," the authors note.
Whites of their eyes: Infants respond to social cues from sclera, study finds Infants at 7 months old are able to unconsciously pick up on eye cues, based on the size of the whites of a person’s eyes – a vital foundation for the development of social interactive skills, a new psychology study shows.