Article Description
Explaining the Ferguson Killing: Five Factors Michael Brown did not follow police officer Darren Wilson's order to walk on the sidewalk and the situation escalated. Why does killing a disrespectful teenager seem “right”? Here are five overlapping explanations.
Can You Find 20 Minutes to Be Extraordinary Today? Overcoming the tendency to spend nearly all our time doing ordinary things in the ordinary way is the first step to thriving in our careers.
The perils of perfection. Part II There is a paradox in the idea of perfection: on one hand you think you have very high standards and on the other the pressure of perfectionism keeps you from actually achieving your goals. Perfectionism can keep you from trying things out of fear that you won’t be able to...
The perils of perfection – Part I “Have no fear of perfection. You’ll never reach it” (S. Dali). We want to be the perfect artist, parent, manager, student, etc. We want perfect lives, perfect jobs, perfect parents and perfect selves. We learn from an early age that 4.0 is the goal and that we “shouldn’t” want anything...
#126 Mothers and Fathers and Daughters The relationship of parents to a daughter is similar in many ways to that of a son but, it seems to me there are important differences. The basic elements of a healthy parent/daughter relationship are, sadly enough, not something I experienced in my own upbringing. As I said last week...
Getting Past Those Awkward Moments — in Baseball and You might not expect to pick up marriage tips from a baseball team. Yet as my home team, the San Francisco Giants, moved toward the World Championship, I was struck by how they showed similar character traits to those I encourage in my couples therapy clients. Some spouses I work...
Study shows mental health impact of breast size differences in teens Differences in breast size have a significant mental health impact in adolescent girls, affecting self-esteem, emotional well-being, and social functioning, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). More than just a “cosmetic issue,” breast asymmetry can have negative psychological and emotional [...]The post Study shows mental health impact of breast size differences in teens appeared first on PsyPost.
Conscious Relating We often put a lot of time and effort into raising our consciousness. We meditate, practice tai chi, and do yoga to stretch our bodies and our spirits. But all the mindfulness practice in the world doesn’t help our relationships if we don’t choose to integrate this growth of consciousness...
Brain’s reaction to virtual reality should prompt further study, suggests new neuroscience study UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes. “The pattern of activity in a brain region involved in spatial learning in the virtual [...]The post Brain’s reaction to virtual reality should prompt further study, suggests new neuroscience study appeared first on PsyPost.
Babies remember nothin’ but a good time, study says Parents who spend their time playing with and talking to their five-month-old baby may wonder whether their child remembers any of it a day later. Thanks to a new BYU study, we now know that they at least remember the good times. The study, published in Infant Behavior and Development, shows that babies are more [...]The post Babies remember nothin’ but a good time, study says appeared first on PsyPost.
Teens prescribed anti-anxiety or sleep medications more likely to abuse those drugs illegally Teens prescribed anti-anxiety or sleep medications may be up to 12 times more likely to abuse those drugs illegally than teens who have never received a prescription, often by obtaining additional pills from friends or family members, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. Based on surveys of more than 2,700 high [...]The post Teens prescribed anti-anxiety or sleep medications more likely to abuse those drugs illegally appeared first on PsyPost.
Penn team’s game theory analysis shows how evolution favors cooperation’s collapse Last year, University of Pennsylvania researchers Alexander J. Stewart and Joshua B. Plotkin published a mathematical explanation for why cooperation and generosity have evolved in nature. Using the classical game theory match-up known as the Prisoner’s Dilemma, they found that generous strategies were the only ones that could persist and succeed in a multi-player, iterated [...]The post Penn team’s game theory analysis shows how evolution favors cooperation’s collapse appeared first on PsyPost.
The sound of status: People know high-power voices when they hear them Being in a position of power can fundamentally change the way you speak, altering basic acoustic properties of the voice, and other people are able to pick up on these vocal cues to know who is really in charge, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [...]The post The sound of status: People know high-power voices when they hear them appeared first on PsyPost.
Protein that rouses the brain from sleep may be target for Alzheimer’s prevention A protein that stimulates the brain to awaken from sleep may be a target for preventing Alzheimer’s disease, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests. In recent years, scientists at Washington University have established links between sleep problems and Alzheimer’s. For example, they have shown in people and [...]The post Protein that rouses the brain from sleep may be target for Alzheimer’s prevention appeared first on PsyPost.
Test detects early brain damage in football players A new, enhanced MRI diagnostic approach was, for the first time, able to identify significant damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of professional football players following “unreported” trauma or mild concussions. Published in the current issue of JAMA Neurology, this study could improve decision making on when an athlete should “return to play.” According to [...]The post Test detects early brain damage in football players appeared first on PsyPost.
How does the brain react to virtual reality? Completely different pattern of activity in brain Neurophysicists studying a key brain region where Alzheimer's disease begins have discovered how the brain processes virtual reality. 'The pattern of activity in a brain region involved in spatial learning in the virtual world is completely different than in the real world,' said the professor of physics, neurology, and neurobiology.
Electric Shock Study Shows We'd Rather Hurt Ourselves Than Strangers How much money would you pay to prevent a complete stranger from being administered an electric shock? And how would that compare to what you'd give up to prevent your own pain? A fascinating new experiment suggests we may be more altruistic than we think....
Want Wisdom? Choose Irony. Here’s the trouble with life: We often face choices in which each of the available options could save or screw us, tough-judgment-call situations in which it’s not obvious whether to go with plan A or B, either of which could be just the ticket or just the ticket to hell. Irony is a wonderful tool for facing wisely into the challenge.
Want Wisdom? Choose Irony Wisdom respects life's tough questions, not easy answers. Irony cultivates our patience with the tough questions.
Why Do We Force Weather Forecasters to Lie to Us? Ever hear of "wet bias"? It's the tendency of forecasters to over-estimate our chances of feeling the wrath of the weather gods. Why do they do it? Basically, we force them to. ...