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New genetic cause for rare form of epilepsy identified An international research team that includes the University of Melbourne’s Professor Sam Berkovic (AC) has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaboration have been published in Nature Genetics. Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME) are rare, inherited, and usually childhood-onset neurodegenerative diseases whose core symptoms are epileptic seizures and [...]The post New genetic cause for rare form of epilepsy identified appeared first on PsyPost.
Family ties that bind: Having the right surname sets you up for life If your surname reveals that you descended from the “in” crowd in the England of 1066—the Norman Conquerors—then even now you are more likely than the average Brit to be upper class. To a surprising degree, the social status of your ancestors many generations in the past still exerts an influence on your life chances, [...]The post Family ties that bind: Having the right surname sets you up for life appeared first on PsyPost.
Readying the neural network: Study examines extrasynaptic neurotransmitter receptors Synapse, the name for the signal-receiving site on a neuron, comes from the Greek word for contact. Neuroscientists used to maintain that neurons form one-to-one relationship to contact one another. Yet more researchers are finding evidence that shows how neurons function as part of a network. An incoming excitation does not always provoke an outgoing [...]The post Readying the neural network: Study examines extrasynaptic neurotransmitter receptors appeared first on PsyPost.
YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder use a popular social media website like YouTube to provide and receive naturally occurring peer support, Dartmouth researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE. “What we found most surprising about our findings was that people with severe mental illness were so open [...]The post YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness appeared first on PsyPost.
Office stress? Workers may wait before acting out Employers know that dramatic changes in the workplace, such as the start of the “busy season” or a new, more demanding boss, can cause employees to act out in ways that hurt the bottom line. But a new study suggests that companies may be underestimating the impact of such behavior because they assume it only [...]The post Office stress? Workers may wait before acting out appeared first on PsyPost.
Passionate vs. Opinionated - The 7 Distinctions Distinction 1: Passionate people are win-win. Opinionated people are “zero sum.” Distinction 2: Passionate people are focused on what feels true and right for them. Opinionated people are focused on being right more than what feels right to them.
Tips to Ease Relationship Tensions I came home after a dinner with friends to hungry cats, wet laundry still in the washing machine, and muddy footprints tracked across the carpet. I was tired. And I felt my tension rise. I’d expected those chores to be covered. He had been out in the yard, digging a...
Three Things Your Therapist Should Be Telling You About A lot is known about depression. We now know that there is particular neurological pattern that emerges in the brain of a depressed person. We also know that there are specific ways depressed people think — and don’t think. And we also know that there are specific behaviors that accompany...
8 Secrets Your Eyes Reveal About Your Health! They say the eyes are the window to the soul. People assign all sorts of meaning to the eyes, ranging from wild claims about personality characteristics to which eye color is best for romantic compatibility. People with green eyes are rumored to be more passionate, while blue eyed folks are...
The Basic Emotion That Makes Infants Remember What They’ve Seen Five-month-olds can remember what they've seen when it is paired with this emotion. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Reason Overwhelming Happiness Makes People Cry Loving Touch is Critical for Premature Infants Magic Mushrooms: How They Affect the Brain’s Emotion Centres The Simple Mindset That Makes Everyone Happier, All Around The World The Emotion Which Lasts 240 Times Longer Than Others
Expecting to Be Happy Makes You Happier How happy do you expect to be? The answer to that question could have a major influence on how happy you feel. A team of scientists led by Robb Rutledge from the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, found that our in-the-moment happiness levels are influenced by activities,...
Psychology Around the Net: November 29, 2014 This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers ways to keep your sanity during seasonal shopping, learning how to motivate yourself by pretending your life is a movie (wow!), and even tips on how to read and interpret others’ facial expressions…and act accordingly. Enjoy! Black Friday Prep: Crowd Psychology Can Help...
Does Psychoanalytic Therapy Really Work? Over the years many people have questioned whether psychoanalysis really works. It has especially come under attack in recent years, as psychotherapy has become controlled by insurance companies, who bemoan any long-term treatment. Those who practice psychoanalytic psychotherapy have asserted strongly that it works. They point to qualitative improvements in...
Using social media for behavioral studies is cheap, fast, but fraught with biases The rise of social media has seemed like a bonanza for behavioral scientists, who have eagerly tapped the social nets to quickly and cheaply gather huge amounts of data about what people are thinking and doing. But computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and McGill University warn that those massive datasets may be misleading. In [...]The post Using social media for behavioral studies is cheap, fast, but fraught with biases appeared first on PsyPost.
Most American presidents destined to fade from nation’s memory, study suggests American presidents spend their time in office trying to carve out a prominent place in the nation’s collective memory, but most are destined to be forgotten within 50-to-100 years of their serving as president, suggests a study on presidential name recall released today by the journal Science. “By the year 2060, Americans will probably remember [...]The post Most American presidents destined to fade from nation’s memory, study suggests appeared first on PsyPost.
Surviving Infidelity: Regain Your Confidence & Self-Esteem It’s not okay for someone to give you less than 100% love and safety. Ladies, if you’ve been cheated on, then you know how crippling it can be to your self-esteem. It can send a crumbling ripple effect to your ego, making you feel worthless for many months, if not...
Why Our Brains Love Babies (Video) Brief educational video on the neuroscience behind why babies are so cute....
Do ‘typical’ sexual fantasies exist? Can we use unusual sexual fantasies to identify sexual deviancy? Is there a link between what people fantasize about and how they actually behave? Psychiatry’s two main diagnostic manuals list certain sexual interests – such as voyeurism, exhibitionism, fetishism, sadism and masochism – as “anomalous” or “unusual”. But, our study shows that some of these [...]The post Do ‘typical’ sexual fantasies exist? appeared first on PsyPost.
Retail rage: Why Black Friday leads shoppers to behave badly The manic nature of Black Friday has often led shoppers to engage in fistfights and other misbehavior in their desperation to snatch up the last ultra-discounted television, computer or pair of pants. What is it about the day after Thanksgiving, historically one of the busiest shopping days of the year and traditionally the start of [...]The post Retail rage: Why Black Friday leads shoppers to behave badly appeared first on PsyPost.
The “Birds and the Bees” Differ for Boys and Girls In a forthcoming publication in Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences with my undergraduate RAs and developmental psychologist Dawn K. Melzer, I explored the content of communications that parents have with their children about sex. Our participants’ parents were more focused on guarding the sexuality of their daughters than their sons.