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Best of Our Blogs: December 2, 2014 “If you think you’re enlightened, go spend a week with your family.” ~Ram Dass Can you believe it’s already December? With just a month left in 2014, I bet you’re feeling pretty pressured and stressed right now. Yet, there is a way to transform this emotionally laden and financially distressing time...
Just because you think your children are extraordinary, doesn’t mean they are It is natural for parents to value their child – and feeling valued is key to children’s well-being; but some parents “overvalue” their child, believing their child is more special and more entitled than others. The idea of parental overvaluation was first introduced in psychology by Sigmund Freud, who saw it as “a revival and [...]The post Just because you think your children are extraordinary, doesn’t mean they are appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuronal encoding of the switch from specific to generalized fear “I can’t get the memories out of my mind!… I am right back in Vietnam, in the middle of the monsoon season at my guard post. My hands are freezing, yet sweat pours from my entire body…I smell a damp sulfur smell. Suddenly I see what’s left of my buddy Troy, his head on a [...]The post Neuronal encoding of the switch from specific to generalized fear appeared first on PsyPost.
Understanding panic disorder and the brain’s suffocation alarm Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. Scientists have known from studying twins that genes contribute to the risk of panic disorder, but very little is known about which specific genes are involved. Two of [...]The post Understanding panic disorder and the brain’s suffocation alarm appeared first on PsyPost.
Political correctness in diverse workplace fosters creativity People may associate political correctness with conformity but new research finds it also correlates with creativity in work settings. Imposing a norm that sets clear expectations of how women and men should interact with each other into a work environment unexpectedly encourages creativity among mixed-sex work groups by reducing uncertainty in relationships. The study highlights [...]The post Political correctness in diverse workplace fosters creativity appeared first on PsyPost.
For doctors, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients Give therapists and psychiatrists information about the biology of a mental disorder, and they have less — not more — empathy for the patient, a new Yale study shows. The findings released Dec. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, challenge the notion that biological explanations for mental illness boost compassion for [...]The post For doctors, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients appeared first on PsyPost.
How anxiety messes with your sleep If you wake up in the middle of the night because of anxiety, you're not the only oneThe post How anxiety messes with your sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Do early birds really have an advantage over night owls? Does the early bird really get the worm?The post Do early birds really have an advantage over night owls? appeared first on PsyPost.
Imaging shows brain connection breakdown in early Alzheimer’s disease Changes in brain connections visible on MRI could represent an imaging biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. As many as 5 million Americans are affected, a number expected to [...]The post Imaging shows brain connection breakdown in early Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Starting a Counseling Practice Part 4: Choosing an Office Once you have your business plan in place the question remains, where are you going to do business? This is really the first thing many of us want to rush towards first above all else. Based off of your business plan, you might have an idea of where your clients...
Being an Arrogant Know-It-All: A Surefire Way to Derail Your Career If you listen to people talk, sometimes overtly and other times more subtly, you’ll catch them talking about themselves, bragging about their own skills/abilities, and/or taking credit for things. It’s funny how people will fall in love with their own ideas, methods, and processes. And when they talk about their ideas, which seems to somehow … Continue reading Being an Arrogant Know-It-All: A Surefire Way to Derail Your Career →
Please Excuse My Absence. I Had Parentitis.   I’m new to Psych Central.  I started writing here in late September.  I promised to write twice a week.  I began slowly as I was finding my footing, but my first posts were decent and I was developing a rhythm and style.  And then, November arrived. The first full week in November...
Stress in early childhood changes how people deal with challenging situations later in life Traumatic events leave their mark. People exposed to a traumatic experience early in life are more likely to be affected by illnesses such as borderline personality disorder or depression. However such experience can also have positive effects in certain circumstances. Thus, moderate stress in childhood may help a person develop strategies to better cope with [...]The post Stress in early childhood changes how people deal with challenging situations later in life appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers explore 3-D microsurgical anatomy of brainstem A study using intricate fiber dissection techniques provides new insights into the deep anatomy of the human brainstem–and helps to define “safe entry zones” for neurosurgeons performing brainstem surgery, according to a special article published in Operative Neurosurgery, a quarterly supplement to Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. These publications are published [...]The post Researchers explore 3-D microsurgical anatomy of brainstem appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds it’s mean boys, not mean girls, who rule at school Debunking the myth of the “mean girl,” new research from the University of Georgia has found that boys use relational aggression—malicious rumors, social exclusion and rejection—to harm or manipulate others more often than girls. The longitudinal study, published online in the journal Aggressive Behavior, followed a cohort of students from middle to high school and [...]The post Study finds it’s mean boys, not mean girls, who rule at school appeared first on PsyPost.
Politics, not severe weather, drive global warming views: study Scientists have presented the most comprehensive evidence to date that climate extremes such as droughts and record temperatures are failing to change people’s minds about global warming. Instead, political orientation is the most influential factor in shaping perceptions about climate change, both in the short-term and long-term, said Sandra Marquart-Pyatt, a Michigan State University sociologist [...]The post Politics, not severe weather, drive global warming views: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Do most people get PTSD after terrifying incidents? The assumption that everyone is prone to developing the condition after witnessing a traumatic event isn’t the only myth that exists about post-traumatic stress disorder.
Natural ‘high’ could avoid chronic marijuana use Replenishing the supply of a molecule that normally activates cannabinoid receptors in the brain could relieve mood and anxiety disorders and enable some people to quit using marijuana, a Vanderbilt University study suggests. Cannabinoid receptors are normally activated by compounds in the brain called endocannabinoids, the most abundant of which is 2-AG. They also are [...]The post Natural ‘high’ could avoid chronic marijuana use appeared first on PsyPost.
The human eye can see ‘invisible’ infrared light Any science textbook will tell you we can’t see infrared light. Like X-rays and radio waves, infrared light waves are outside the visual spectrum. But an international team of researchers co-led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that under certain conditions, the retina can sense infrared light after [...]The post The human eye can see ‘invisible’ infrared light appeared first on PsyPost.
Science suggests intermittent fasting may have health benefits An eating schedule that involves "intermittent fasting" could help fight many related diseases of modern life, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's.