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How to Stop Feeling Guilty Over Others’ Accomplishments Wait, what? How to stop feeling guilty over others’ accomplishments? Aren’t we more commonly jealous, envious, or resentful over other people’s success? Maybe. However, when we see others succeeding while we’re NOT succeeding, we feel a little guilty, too — especially if we feel there’s something we can do about...
How much of my holiday depression is my fault? Somewhere, probably over some freakin’ rainbow, is the Christmas of my dreams. You know the one with little kids making snow angels in the front yard, a new Lexus in the driveway with a ginormous bow on it and gingerbread houses that don’t collapse. However, I live in south Florida...
The Marshmallow Test, “Willpower” and ADHD, Part 2 Many think of motivation as a single power that each person tends to have more or less of.
How To Turn Character Flaws Into Strengths With One Easy Mental Trick An easy mental trick to turn poor personality traits to your advantage. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Get Motivated to Exercise: Here’s a Simple Mental Trick You Can Do Right Now Most Unlikely Weight Loss Trick Revealed by Psych Experiment Why The Typical Antisocial, Narcissistic, Depressive TV Detective Would in Reality Be a Terrible Judge of Character The Incubation Effect: How to Break Through a Mental Block How To Quickly Turn Your Emotions Up or Down
The Marshmallow Test, “Willpower” and ADHD, Part 1 The capacity to resist temptation is not so easily taught nor easily sustained.
Creating bonds when memory fades There are ways to stay emotionally connected even when a parent or loved one suffers from dementia.
Seasonal Affective Disorder and the difference from winter blues Winter blues often involves a lack of sleep while SAD means people are permanently tired and spend longer in bed.
New cause of child brain tumor condition identified Doctors and scientists have identified changes in a gene, which can increase the risk of developing brain tumors in children with a rare inherited condition called Gorlin syndrome. Most people with Gorlin syndrome have a change in a gene called PTCH1, but the new research has revealed that changes in a gene called SUFU also cause Gorlin syndrome and it is children with a change in SUFU that are 20 times more likely to develop a brain tumor.
The Biology of Anxious Temperament May Lie With a Problem in an Anxiety 'Off Switch' Persistent anxiety is one of the most common and distressing symptoms compromising mental health. Most of the research on the neurobiology of anxiety has focused on the generation of increased anxiety, i.e., the processes that “turn on” anxiety. But what if the problem lay with the “off switch” instead? In other words, the dysfunction could exist in the ability to diminish anxiety once it has begun. A new report suggests that deficits in one of the brain’s off switches for anxiety, neuropeptide Y receptors, are decreased in association with anxious temperament.
Best of Our Blogs: December 2, 2014 “If you think you’re enlightened, go spend a week with your family.” ~Ram Dass Can you believe it’s already December? With just a month left in 2014, I bet you’re feeling pretty pressured and stressed right now. Yet, there is a way to transform this emotionally laden and financially distressing time...
Just because you think your children are extraordinary, doesn’t mean they are It is natural for parents to value their child – and feeling valued is key to children’s well-being; but some parents “overvalue” their child, believing their child is more special and more entitled than others. The idea of parental overvaluation was first introduced in psychology by Sigmund Freud, who saw it as “a revival and [...]The post Just because you think your children are extraordinary, doesn’t mean they are appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuronal encoding of the switch from specific to generalized fear “I can’t get the memories out of my mind!… I am right back in Vietnam, in the middle of the monsoon season at my guard post. My hands are freezing, yet sweat pours from my entire body…I smell a damp sulfur smell. Suddenly I see what’s left of my buddy Troy, his head on a [...]The post Neuronal encoding of the switch from specific to generalized fear appeared first on PsyPost.
Understanding panic disorder and the brain’s suffocation alarm Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. Scientists have known from studying twins that genes contribute to the risk of panic disorder, but very little is known about which specific genes are involved. Two of [...]The post Understanding panic disorder and the brain’s suffocation alarm appeared first on PsyPost.
Political correctness in diverse workplace fosters creativity People may associate political correctness with conformity but new research finds it also correlates with creativity in work settings. Imposing a norm that sets clear expectations of how women and men should interact with each other into a work environment unexpectedly encourages creativity among mixed-sex work groups by reducing uncertainty in relationships. The study highlights [...]The post Political correctness in diverse workplace fosters creativity appeared first on PsyPost.
For doctors, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients Give therapists and psychiatrists information about the biology of a mental disorder, and they have less — not more — empathy for the patient, a new Yale study shows. The findings released Dec. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, challenge the notion that biological explanations for mental illness boost compassion for [...]The post For doctors, more biology info means less empathy for mental health patients appeared first on PsyPost.
How anxiety messes with your sleep If you wake up in the middle of the night because of anxiety, you're not the only oneThe post How anxiety messes with your sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Do early birds really have an advantage over night owls? Does the early bird really get the worm?The post Do early birds really have an advantage over night owls? appeared first on PsyPost.
Imaging shows brain connection breakdown in early Alzheimer’s disease Changes in brain connections visible on MRI could represent an imaging biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. As many as 5 million Americans are affected, a number expected to [...]The post Imaging shows brain connection breakdown in early Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Starting a Counseling Practice Part 4: Choosing an Office Once you have your business plan in place the question remains, where are you going to do business? This is really the first thing many of us want to rush towards first above all else. Based off of your business plan, you might have an idea of where your clients...
Being an Arrogant Know-It-All: A Surefire Way to Derail Your Career If you listen to people talk, sometimes overtly and other times more subtly, you’ll catch them talking about themselves, bragging about their own skills/abilities, and/or taking credit for things. It’s funny how people will fall in love with their own ideas, methods, and processes. And when they talk about their ideas, which seems to somehow … Continue reading Being an Arrogant Know-It-All: A Surefire Way to Derail Your Career →