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Sense of meaning and purpose in life linked to longer lifespan A UCL-led study of 9,050 English people with an average age of 65 found that the people with the greatest wellbeing were 30% less likely to die during the average eight and a half year follow-up period than those with the least wellbeing. The study, published in The Lancet as part of a special series [...]The post Sense of meaning and purpose in life linked to longer lifespan appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscientists awaken ‘ghosts’ hidden inside the cortex Ghosts exist only in the mind, and scientists know just where to find them, an EPFL study suggests. Patients suffering from neurological or psychiatric conditions have often reported feeling a strange “presence”. Now, EPFL researchers in Switzerland have succeeded in recreating this so-called ghost illusion in the laboratory. On June 29, 1970, mountaineer Reinhold Messner [...]The post Neuroscientists awaken ‘ghosts’ hidden inside the cortex appeared first on PsyPost.
New knowledge about the human brain’s plasticity The brain’s plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Cell. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the human brain. The results show that a type of support [...]The post New knowledge about the human brain’s plasticity appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows black, Hispanic children underrepresented in autism identification The number of children diagnosed with autism has increased in recent years, but a new study co-authored by a University of Kansas professor shows that while the number of students with autism increased in every state from 2000 to 2007, black and Hispanic children were significantly underrepresented. Jason Travers, assistant professor of special education, co-authored [...]The post Study shows black, Hispanic children underrepresented in autism identification appeared first on PsyPost.
Defense Mechanisms: Test Your Unconscious Coping Techniques Pretending to hate someone you love, overeating, yelling and being overly optimistic are all manifestations of your unconscious defense mechanisms. This test will help you find out what psychological defenses you tend to use the most (80 questions).
3 Lessons on Body Image, Self-Doubt & Self-Care This month marks five years since I started writing Weightless. (This was my first post published on November 2nd 2009.) Five years! Wow. It’s cliche, but true: Time flies. Like I do every year, I’d like to share a few lessons I’ve learned along the way from writing this blog...
The Truth About Alcohol and Abuse It is very Australian to consume large amounts of alcohol, in fact it is a behaviour that envelopes much of our lives. President of the Australian Medical Association Brian Owler says this needs to change. In a speech given to the AMA National Alcohol Summit, he stated some of the raw and honest facts about […]
Emotional Arguments: I am Right and You are Wrong When someone makes an accusation, it is usually hard for them to go back to review the underlying evidence. They will offer you rationalizations to defend their accusations, but these justifications came after the fact. They were made up afterwards to legitimise their own feelings. When you logically try to...
So Many Pills I was doing some much needed clean-up today and found my stash of empty pill bottles. 3 shopping bags full. Now each of these bottles once contained 30, 60, or 180 pills. Try wrapping your head around that. These shopping bags do not include the boxes that my Saphris come...
Why Patients Are Impatient The logistical convenience of the “one size fits all” approach to patient care comes at a cost, and not just in malpractice settlements and premiums. The decision to sue often hinges on a sense of outrage or injustice about the way the patients feel they were treated. And angry people tend to bad-mouth service businesses far more often than the happy ones praise them.
Top 5 Trauma Posts You May Have Missed This week is After Trauma’s one year anniversary and this the 100th post!  The previous post listed the 5 most popular posts.  These are my top 5 favorite posts, many of weren’t that widely read.  So here they are and why I think you should give them a chance! Does Your...
A Psychological Transformation That Only Astronauts Experience We know very little about the effect of space travel on the human psyche – but what we have learned so far suggests that it's profound....
Stem cell transplants for Parkinson's disease edging closer A major breakthrough in the development of stem cell-derived brain cells has put researchers on a firm path towards the first ever stem cell transplantations in people with Parkinson’s disease. A new study presents the next generation of transplantable dopamine neurons produced from stem cells. These cells carry the same properties as the dopamine neurons found in the human brain.
Why It's Harmful to Describe Cancer as a "War" When people talk about cancer, they often resort to the language of war – e.g. Mary lost her brave fight with cancer. Many compelling objections have been made against the use of such "battle metaphors," and a growing body of evidence suggests that, for some people, they can actually be harmful....
Transplant of stem-cell-derived dopamine neurons shows promise for Parkinson's disease Parkinson's disease is an incurable movement disorder that affects millions of people around the world, but current treatment options can cause severe side effects and lose effectiveness over time. In a new study, researchers showed that transplantation of neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, hESCs, can restore motor function in a rat model of Parkinson's disease, paving the way for the use of cell replacement therapy in human clinical trials.
New knowledge about human brain's plasticity The brain's plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers have studied the human brain, and reached some new conclusions.
Ghost illusion created in the lab Patients suffering from neurological or psychiatric conditions have often reported 'feeling a presence' watching over them. Now, researchers have succeeded in recreating these ghostly illusions in the lab.
First peek at how neurons multitask Researchers have shown how a single neuron can perform multiple functions in a model organism, illuminating for the first time this fundamental biological mechanism and shedding light on the human brain.
How To Be More Mature I think the most useful thing I’ve done in my relationship with my partner is to stop complaining about what I didn’t get, (“I’m upset because you _________.”)  and instead, ask for what I want. This doesn’t mean I always get what I want, but the vast majority of the...
Prescription Opioid Abuse: A Gateway to Heroin and Overdose Prescription Opioid Abuse: A Gateway to Heroin and Overdose Opioid-involved overdoses in the United States have dramatically increased in the last 15 years, largely due to a rise in prescription opioid (PO) use. Emerging evidence suggests the increase is linked to unintentional PO misuse that easily turns into addiction. Individuals...