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Two studies predict surgery outcomes for high-risk epilepsy patients Anti-epileptic drugs control seizures and improve quality of life for most people with epilepsy. But for those who find medical treatment ineffective or intolerable, brain surgery is sometimes the next best option. Two studies explore the outcomes of brain surgery for children with severe epilepsy.
How to Set Goals to Help You Be at Your Best “What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” -Henry David Thoreau Can you believe it is already coming to the end of 2014!? As each year passes we have a great opportunity to assess where we are in life...
The Three “Laws of Success” We live in a society conditioned to fail. Unlike other generations where the competitive spirit was encouraged in children and where for the most part survival was a struggle, today’s newer generations in the Western world have a different set of challenges. Today’s major challenges are entitlement and weakness, both...
Some people may be genetically susceptible to UV tanning dependence Researchers have found a possible underlying genetic susceptibility to being dependent on UV tanning. Recent research suggests people who frequently use tanning beds can develop behaviors that fulfill the criteria for dependence. “These behaviours are characterized by continued and frequent tanning despite adverse consequences, such as skin cancer, or tanning with greater frequency than required to maintain [...]The post Some people may be genetically susceptible to UV tanning dependence appeared first on PsyPost.
The protective power of belonging to social groups Having a strong identification with a social group, such as a choir or a sports club, can help protect you against mental illness. That is the finding of two studies by Professor Fabio Sani and colleagues from the University of Dundee that are being presented today, Friday 5 December 2014, at the Annual Conference of [...]The post The protective power of belonging to social groups appeared first on PsyPost.
Dopamine helps with math as well as mood Researchers at the University of Tübingen show rule-applying neurons work better under the influence of the happy hormone The chemical messenger dopamine – otherwise known as the happiness hormone – is important not only for motivation and motor skills. It seems it can also help neurons with difficult cognitive tasks. Torben Ott, Simon Jacob and [...]The post Dopamine helps with math as well as mood appeared first on PsyPost.
How stroke survivors could benefit from Wii video games Stroke survivors can have “significant” improvement in arm movements after using the Nintendo Wii as physiotherapy according to researchers. The popular computer remote could be customised to offer bespoke physiotherapy for stroke survivors in their own home according to research led by Lancaster University. A preliminary study showed that playing specially adapted Wii games improved [...]The post How stroke survivors could benefit from Wii video games appeared first on PsyPost.
Serotonin’s early role in the assembly of brain circuits A lot of research has shown that poor regulation of the serotonin system, caused by certain genetic variations, can increase the risk of developing psychiatric illnesses such as autism, depression, or anxiety disorders. Furthermore, genetic variations in the components of the serotonin system can interact with stress experienced during the foetal stages and/or early childhood, [...]The post Serotonin’s early role in the assembly of brain circuits appeared first on PsyPost.
What brain studies reveal about the risk of adolescent alcohol use and abuse Neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) are zeroing in on brain factors and behaviors that put teens at risk of alcohol use and abuse even before they start drinking. Four abstracts from the Adolescent Development Study exploring these factors will be presented at Neuroscience 2014, the Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting in Washington. The [...]The post What brain studies reveal about the risk of adolescent alcohol use and abuse appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers pinpoint chemo effect on brain cells, potential link to autism UNC School of Medicine researchers have found for the first time a biochemical mechanism that could be a cause of “chemo brain” – the neurological side effects such as memory loss, confusion, difficulty thinking, and trouble concentrating that many cancer patients experience while on chemotherapy to treat tumors in other parts of the body The [...]The post Researchers pinpoint chemo effect on brain cells, potential link to autism appeared first on PsyPost.
People with mental illness more likely to be tested for HIV People with mental illness are more likely to have been tested for HIV than those without mental illness, according to a new study from a team of researchers at Penn Medicine and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published online this week in AIDS Patient Care and STDs. The researchers also found [...]The post People with mental illness more likely to be tested for HIV appeared first on PsyPost.
Can anyone be a journalist? Researcher examines Abernathy v. Sullivan and citizen journalism A new article detailing the relationship of two U.S. Supreme Court cases and how they work together to uphold freedom of expression has been published in the Georgia Law Review by William E. Lee, professor of journalism in the University of Georgia Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. Lee’s article focuses on New York [...]The post Can anyone be a journalist? Researcher examines Abernathy v. Sullivan and citizen journalism appeared first on PsyPost.
Genes, Choice, and Human Aspiration To have aspirations as a society makes no sense at all if we’re each slaves to our genetic dispositions and if whatever goals human beings can individually and collectively have are nothing but reflections of the goals of our genes. But an intellectually rigorous, evolutionarily-informed view of human nature and behavior by no means implies this.
How to Tell if You’re the Victim of Emotional Does your partner behave inappropriately and then blames you? This could be emotional blackmail. Many relationships function on a level that isn’t healthy for either partner, yet each person seems willing to hold onto the relationship at all costs. Their love for each other and desire to remain in the...
Self-Care Sunday: Create A Play-Book I think of play and creativity as a big part of self-care. Because with play and creativity come curiosity (about our bodies, our feelings, the world), humor, laughter, and simply a playful approach to life. That is, instead of criticizing ourselves for being anxious or upset, we can get curious...
Anger Management: Know-How of Eastern Equanimity When anger becomes the mood of human societies, the quality of fire (or the primitive and destructive intent of the frustrated ego) invades the plane of humanity. That fire is expressed as all of the aggression and competitiveness of humankind, including all of the ego-based politics of confrontation. And that...
How to Communicate with Difficult Seniors and Older Adults Do you know a difficult older adult in your life? Higher standards of living and medical advancements are extending life expectancies in many countries to well above the age of eighty. Caring for, and having successful relationships with older adults often requires unique communication skills and strategies. Here are six keys for successful communication with seniors...
What Happens When the Journey Ends (a Tracks Postcript) A few days ago two things happened. I finished reading “Tracks” by Robyn Davidson, and I posted my first attempt to make some sense of her beyond-the-sensible and amazing journey. While the book caused me more than a few sleepless nights, I now feel it was a good kind of...
Left-Handers or Right-Handers: Whose Brains Work Faster? Is it righties or lefties who earn 10-12% higher salaries? Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Male or Female Bosses? The Sex Which Gets More Depressed From Work Heavy Drinkers Lose Memory Faster With Age Intense World: Autistic Brains Create 42% More Information at Rest Like to Stay Up Late? Different Neural Structures Found in the Brains of Night Owls Human Children Grow Up So Slowly Due to Large Brains, Study Finds
Researchers explore genetic basis of early childhood epilepsies A pair of studies provides innovative insights into the genetic underpinnings of childhood epilepsies. Technological advances in genetic analysis have uncovered changes in single genes that account for a surprising number of infantile and early-childhood epilepsies. Though some of the affected genes have been identified, the physical manifestations of these alterations remain largely uncharacterized.