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People show ‘blind insight’ into decision making performance People can gauge the accuracy of their decisions, even if their decision making performance itself is no better than chance, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. In the study, people who showed chance-level decision making still reported greater confidence about decisions that turned out [...]The post People show ‘blind insight’ into decision making performance appeared first on PsyPost.
Study offers new clue into how anesthesia works Anesthesia, long considered a blessing to patients and surgeons, has been a mystery for much of its 160-plus-year history in the operating room. No one could figure out how these drugs interact with the brain to block pain and induce a coma-like, memory-free state. The debate has divided the anesthesia research community into two camps: [...]The post Study offers new clue into how anesthesia works appeared first on PsyPost.
People who speak two languages have more efficient brains, study says New research suggests that bilingual people require less brain power to complete tasks compared to people who speak only one language.
9 Quotes about Life from ‘Garden State’ “Garden State” is a comedy-drama movie featuring Zach Braff and Natalie Portman that captures the state of transition young adults experience in a refreshing light. The narrative features psychological undertones. Andrew Largeman (Braff) has been medicated since he was 10 years old, resulting in his emotional detachment. He is simply...
PhotoTherapy In an age where "selfies" are taken anywhere and posted everywhere on the internet, do the pictures really mean anything? Is it pure narcissism or is there a deeper meaning to the pictures you or I take especially the ones we keep and cherish? In the field of PhotoTherapy, the answer is unequivocally yes as those pictures could hold clues to your true self...
Depression Part V Well, tomorrow is the big day. My first psychiatrist appointment since he prescribed an antidepressant for me, and I am not sure what to tell him. I’ve been trying to track how my antidepressant has affected me these past several weeks and, to be honest, it’s all a confusing mess...
7 Signs Your Workplace is Toxic For many people, the office can feel like a second home. You spend the majority of your waking hours there and your co-workers may likely be the people you interact with most in your life, after family or a spouse. If you’re not happy with your work environment, that dissatisfaction...
Solving the puzzle of cooperation in group environments Research has shown that when two individuals meet repeatedly they are more likely to cooperate with one another. Flávio Pinheiro and colleagues from the Universities of Minho and Lisbon show that the most successful strategy for cooperation occurs only after an experience of group unanimous behaviour. In this week’s PLOS Computational Biology, the authors explore [...]The post Solving the puzzle of cooperation in group environments appeared first on PsyPost.
Total Recall: The science behind it Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). Their research has identified a molecule that puts a brake on brain processing and when removed, brain function and memory recall is improved. [...]The post Total Recall: The science behind it appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists make breakthrough in understanding Parkinson’s disease Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have made an important breakthrough in our understanding of Parkin – a protein that regulates the repair and replacement of nerve cells within the brain. This breakthrough generates a new perspective on how nerve cells die in Parkinson’s disease. The Trinity research group, led by Smurfit Professor of Medical Genetics, [...]The post Scientists make breakthrough in understanding Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
New Alzheimer’s-related memory disorder identified A multi-institutional study has defined and established criteria for a new neurological disease closely resembling Alzheimer’s disease called primary age-related tauopathy (PART). Patients with PART develop cognitive impairment that can be indistinguishable from Alzheimer’s disease, but they lack amyloid plaques. Awareness of this neurological disease will help doctors diagnose and develop more effective treatments for [...]The post New Alzheimer’s-related memory disorder identified appeared first on PsyPost.
Did men evolve navigation skills to find mates? A University of Utah study of two African tribes found evidence that men evolved better navigation ability than women because men with better spatial skills – the ability to mentally manipulate objects – can roam farther and have children with more mates. By testing and interviewing dozens of members of the Twe and Tjimba tribes [...]The post Did men evolve navigation skills to find mates? appeared first on PsyPost.
Sleep disorders found to be highly prevalent in firefighters Sleep disorders are independent risk factors for heart attacks and motor vehicle crashes, which are the two leading causes of death for firefighters in the United States. In a national sample of almost 7,000 firefighters, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) examined the prevalence of common sleep disorders and their association with adverse health [...]The post Sleep disorders found to be highly prevalent in firefighters appeared first on PsyPost.
Facial motion a clue to difficulties in social interaction among autistic adults People on the autistic spectrum may struggle to recognise social cues, unfamiliar people or even someone’s gender because of an inability to interpret changing facial expressions, new research has found. According to the study by academics at Brunel University London, adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), though able to recognise static faces, struggle with tasks [...]The post Facial motion a clue to difficulties in social interaction among autistic adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Oxytocin bonding hormone inhibits the fear center in the brain Frightening experiences do not quickly fade from memory. A team of researchers under the guidance of the University of Bonn Hospital has now been able to demonstrate in a study that the bonding hormone oxytocin inhibits the fear center in the brain and allows fear stimuli to subside more easily. This basic research could also [...]The post Oxytocin bonding hormone inhibits the fear center in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds Alzheimer’s drug may reduce the urge to binge eat The Alzheimer’s drug memantine may perform double-duty helping binge eaters control their compulsion. Researchers have demonstrated that memantine, a neuroprotective drug, may reduce the addictive and impulsive behavior associated with binge eating. The Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) study, which appears online in Neuopsychopharmacology, also found that a specific area in the brain, the [...]The post Study finds Alzheimer’s drug may reduce the urge to binge eat appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Tips for Technology Use in Your Couple Relationship Do you ever feel like your partner spends more time on Facebook than in actual conversation with you? Perhaps you are in a long distance relationship and texting daily is your saving grace? As with anything there are both positive and negatives to the use of technology, and when it comes to relationships, research shows […]
People like us: How our brains view others Race-related demonstrations, Title IX disputes, affirmative action court cases, same-sex marriage bans. These issues made headlines in all spheres of the media this year. However, thoughtful articles on these subjects seem always to devolve to pitting warring factions against each other: black vs white, women vs men, gay vs straight. At the most fundamental level [...]The post People like us: How our brains view others appeared first on PsyPost.
Why is it so hard to see a psychiatrist? Getting psychiatric care in the United States is a lot harder than it should be. Patients around the country are having a hard time booking appointments for outpatient care, and face significant hurdles when it comes to receiving inpatient psychiatric care. Why is this the case? This largely because there just aren’t enough psychiatrists to [...]The post Why is it so hard to see a psychiatrist? appeared first on PsyPost.
Words of Inspiration This is a great poem on loving and accepting yourself. Love who you are and what you do. I accept myself completely. I accept my strengths and my weaknesses, my gifts and my shortcomings, my good points and my faults.   I accept myself completely as a human being and...