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Laughing Gas Can Ease The Symptoms Of Severe Depression A proof-of-concept trial has shown that nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, holds potential as an effective treatment for severe depression in patients who don't respond to standard therapies. Laughter may indeed be the best medicine. ...
Designated Caregiver: Holiday Drinks and Mental Illness Alcohol is a staple at the holiday table despite widespread tales of family dysfunction. The truth is social lubrication makes it a lot easier to deal with some of the more difficult people in our families. But when you add mental illness to the mix, you run bigger risks than...
Holiday Gift Guide: Gifts Especially For You I just read a newsletter with this great idea in it: Gift to yourself this holiday! This good advice comes from colleague, Arlene Englander, LCSW, at The Wellness Source. Arlene writes: Each holiday season we make a list of gifts to give to family and friends to show our love and appreciation...
Top 10 Excuses for Avoiding Psychotherapy Over the years I have heard all the main excuses people give for resisting psychotherapy. Here is my top 10 list. 1) If I go into therapy it means I’m a loser and I’m weak and can’t stand on your own feet. It’s better to work on myself without a...
People with autism share common pattern of brain inflammation Study shows inflammation is caused by an overactive immune response.
The 8 Most Unexpected Advantages of Anxiety Anxiety can be crippling, but psychology studies find it does have some unexpected upsides. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:New Friendship Study Has Great Message for Social Anxiety Sufferers 8 Fascinating Facts About Anxiety Anxiety’s Influence on Developing Alzheimer’s Disease Anxiety: Getting Excited Beats Trying to Calm Down Diet Tip: The Unexpected Effect of Comfort Food on Bad Moods
10 Journaling Prompts for the Mind and Body Conscious Journaling is a healthy way to express how we’re feeling—and, sometimes, discover how we’re feeling. Ideally, journaling is time we spend by ourselves exploring our inner most thoughts—those that we don’t always feel comfortable sharing with others (or sometimes even with ourselves). Below are 10 journaling prompts to help you...
The Affordable Pair Act: Guest Post by Beth O’Donnell Bella's intro: I am often contacted by people who would like me to publish their writing as a guest post. Usually, I have to think about it. Is the article really something that would interest "Single at Heart" readers? Is it smart enough? Fresh enough? Not so with today's...
The Therapeutic Underbelly of Borderline Personality Disorder The most difficult aspect of Being Borderline is intimate relationships and that includes the special relationship we have with our therapists.  After nearly twenty years of (on and off and when needed) therapy, a certain familiarity happens and feelings, not always positive, can occur.  I will be honest here and I find that...
Why Does Anxiety Feel So Bad? Explained in 98 Seconds Fear is a state triggered by real, objective danger. When there is an actual threat staring you in the face, fear activates the release of chemicals into your body to help you survive. This is otherwise known as the famous fight, flight or freeze response. As humans have evolved, we’ve...
Multiple, short learning sessions strengthen memory formation in fragile X syndrome A learning technique that maximizes the brain's ability to make and store memories may help overcome cognitive issues seen in fragile X syndrome, a leading form of intellectual disability, according to neurobiologists.
Cognitive training can improve brain performance of students in poverty The cognitive effects of poverty can be mitigated during middle school with a targeted intervention, according to researchers who, for the first time, examined the efficacy of cognitive training in a large and diverse group of 7th and 8th grade public middle school students as compared to typically developing students who received no specific training.
Fructose and glucose: Brain reward circuits respond differently to two kinds of sugar New information suggests the brain responds differently to different sugars, and that one type could be connected with overeating. Brain responses to fructose, a simple sugar contained in high-fructose corn syrup, produced activation in the brain's 'reward circuit,' and increased the desire for food, according to new research. This was not true for glucose, the body's major energy source, which is produced mainly by breakdown of complex carbohydrates.
Early results indicate potential for focused ultrasound to treat OCD The potential of focused ultrasound to treat certain patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been supported by new research. "There is a need for non-invasive treatment options for patients with OCD that cannot be managed through medication," says the lead investigator. "Using focused ultrasound, we were able to reduce the symptoms for these patients and help them get some of their life back without the risks or complications of the more invasive surgical approaches that are currently available."
4 Reasons to Forgive but Not Forget We’ve all heard the admonition “you need to forgive and forget.” Many of us heard this as a child from our parents when we had been wronged by a sibling or friend. We were told to turn the other cheek and give our pals another chance. Some of us learned...
I Can’t Seem To Hold Back Time With ADHD I whistle, in the dark. I consciously look for the light places. I search for the good. I concentrate on the things I love. And for the most part, I’m a positive person. I make known my happy and cheerful thoughts and those thoughts come back to me from every...
Snake oil salesmen selling torture The US Government has just released its report on the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program, aptly branded the “torture report”, which is available online as a pdf. It makes for appalling reading but sheds light on the role of two psychologists in the creation and running of what turned out to be genuinely counter-productive ‘enhanced […]
Are You Dating a Narcissist or a Borderline? Perhaps you have been involved with someone who appears to be seriously interested in the relationship but who sometimes goes emotionally off the rails, lashes out at you, and becomes over-defensive. And what if they also have an exaggerated need for attention, over-react when criticized, and seem to shut you...
Sleep disturbance linked to amyloid in brain areas affected by Alzheimer’s disease Healthy, elderly research participants who report being more sleepy and less rested have higher levels of amyloid deposition in regions of the brain that are affected in Alzheimer’s disease, according to a report presented today at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology annual meeting in Phoenix (Arizona). If sleep disturbance is a cause of amyloid accumulation, [...]The post Sleep disturbance linked to amyloid in brain areas affected by Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
People with opioid dependence in recovery show ‘re-regulation’ of reward systems Within a few months after drug withdrawal, patients in recovery from dependence on prescription pain medications may show signs that the body’s natural reward systems are normalizing, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, [...]The post People with opioid dependence in recovery show ‘re-regulation’ of reward systems appeared first on PsyPost.