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Are you genetically predisposed to antisocial behavior? Both positive and negative experiences influence how genetic variants affect the brain and thereby behaviour, according to a new study. “Evidence is accumulating to show that the effects of variants of many genes that are common in the population depend on environmental factors. Further, these genetic variants affect each other,” explained Sheilagh Hodgins of the [...]The post Are you genetically predisposed to antisocial behavior? appeared first on PsyPost.
How much science can be found in pop music? And how much pop music is in science? In his research, Joachim Allgaier (Institute of Science, Technology and Society Studies) examines the occurrence of science in mainstream pop music and asks whether the media of popular culture are suitable for scientific communication. Working with Chun-Ju Huang (National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan), the sociologist recently published a study in the journal “Public Understanding of [...]The post How much science can be found in pop music? And how much pop music is in science? appeared first on PsyPost.
Cocaine consumption quadruples the risk of sudden death in people between 19 and 49 A joint piece of research conducted by the UPV/EHU, the Basque Institute of Forensic Medicine, and the Biomedical Research Centre Network into Mental Health (CIBERSAM) of the Carlos III Institute of Health links, for the first time, the increase in sudden cardiovascular death with the recent consumption of cocaine. In people in the 19-49 age [...]The post Cocaine consumption quadruples the risk of sudden death in people between 19 and 49 appeared first on PsyPost.
Current practices in reporting on behavioral genetics can mislead the public “Media reports about behavioural genetics unintentionally induce unfounded beliefs, therefore going against the educational purpose of scientific reporting,” writes the University of Montreal’s Alexandre Morin-Chassé, following his study of 1,500 Americans. “Among other things, we wanted to know if the public understood (or misunderstood) popular science articles about a new research field, genopolitics, and whether [...]The post Current practices in reporting on behavioral genetics can mislead the public appeared first on PsyPost.
Cross-talk in the brain: Study finds neurons listen to glia cells Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have discovered a new signal pathway in the brain that plays an important role in learning and the processing of sensory input. It was already known that distinct glial cells receive information from neurons. However, it was unknown that these same glial cells also transmit information [...]The post Cross-talk in the brain: Study finds neurons listen to glia cells appeared first on PsyPost.
Self-Care Sunday: Make A Date with Your Feelings In her book Expectation Hangover: Overcoming Disappointment in Work, Love and Life Christine Hassler includes a valuable tip for honoring our feelings. Sometimes, when negative feelings arise, we might not be able to experience them fully. We might be at work or with others. That’s when scheduling a date with...
Friends sabotaging your goals? Or is it the other In a 2014 experiment of the famous Milgram Paradigm study (1) – regarding agreeability and obedience – it was shown that people who are more agreeable or “nicer” are more likely to hurt others because they do not want to displease or look disagreeable. Specifically – when told to induce...
Kindness in Kids and The Nature-Nurture Debate Lucy eyes Charlie’s toy and decides that she wants it. Charlie, noticing this, kindly extends the toy to her, showing prosocial behavior. Is this nature or nurture?
How To Simulate Hazing In An Experiment In 1959, inspired by hazing rituals, two psychologists wanted to see if having to go through something miserable to get into a group made people like that group more. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they found that misery did, in fact, help. What was interesting was how they made people miserable....
Suicide, Grief and the Time Machine At some point someone has been asked that playful question: If you had a time machine and you could go back and change one and only one thing, what would it be? When suicide has touched your life, there is only one answer to that question. No more thoughtful musings...
Facts About Mental Illness in America Unbelievable numbers. Statistics about mental disorders between adults and children in the U.S. [INFOGRAPHIC].
Harvard Business Review Cares about Women’s Success — But The December 2014 issue of the Harvard Business Review features an article that has already made the pages of the New York Times. Titled “Rethink what you ‘know’ about high-achieving women,” the piece presents the results of a survey of more than 25,000 graduates of Harvard Business School. The authors...
A Foolproof Way To Use Forgetting To Help You Remember, Study Reveals When you save information digitally, your real memory for that information is worse, but a new study reveals a positive flipside. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Social Anxiety Disorder: Impressive Study Reveals The Very Best Treatment How to Take Notes You Will Remember You Can Learn a New Language While You Sleep, Study Finds Why People’s Names Are So Hard to Remember The Myth of Cognitive Decline: Elderly Know More and Use it Better
The Latest on Healthy, Long-Lasting Relationships? Both Partners Cultivate It seems unfair. Of the many couples that get married each year, hoping to find lifelong companionship, lasting joy, friendship and fulfillment, only about 50% will stay married, and of those that do, the vast majority, about 70%, devolve into arrangements that are unsatisfying at best, and dysfunctional or even destructive at worst. Cheer...
e-Cig Research Raises as Many Questions as It Answers A recent study commissioned by the Ministry of Health in Japan, has found that e-cigarettes may hold more carcinogens than traditional cigarettes. One brand which was tested contained ten times as many toxins. The growing popularity of e-cigarettes has raised significan controvery among public health authorities. Organizations as disparate as...
Addicted to Affluence Many people mistake affluence for self-worth. You can buy what you want to buy. Live where you want to live. Own what you want to own. You’ve made it! What a worthy, wonderful person you are! So how come you’re still feeling that it’s not enough? You bought what you...
Steven Pinker on a Burrito Bag! Can one find wisdom on a burrito bag? My wife discovered a long quote from psychologist Steven Pinker on her Chipotle’s lunch sack. Right there, wrapped around a bowl full of carnitas and guacamole, Pinker offered a two-minute summary of scientific data addressing the question: Is the world becoming a better or worse place to live?
Help for the Daydreaming Child Children who display disrupting behaviors, such as hyperactivity, talking when they are not supposed to, aggression, fidgeting, and other more challenging behaviors are often the children who receive the most attention in terms of being identified as a child in need of support services in school or as a child...
The Psychology of Rewarding Yourself with Treats In my book Better Than Before, I describe the many strategies that we can use to change our habits. We all have our favorites — but I think most of us would agree that the Strategy of Treats is the most fun strategy. “Treats” may sound like a self-indulgent, frivolous strategy, but it’s not. Because...
Can a blood biomarker predict the presence of intracranial lesions following mild traumatic brain injury? In cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI), predicting the likelihood of a cranial lesion and determining the need for head computed tomography (CT) can be aided by measuring markers of bone injury in the blood. The results of a new study comparing the usefulness of two biomarkers released into the blood following a TBI are [...]The post Can a blood biomarker predict the presence of intracranial lesions following mild traumatic brain injury? appeared first on PsyPost.