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Starting a Counseling Practice Part 2: Giving yourself permission Hope you enjoyed really getting to know yourself in Starting a Counseling Practice Part 1. The truth is, getting honest with yourself is only the first step in creating and implementing a great private practice vision. You also have to give yourself permission. I know there are people out there...
Danger of repeat head injuries: Brain’s inability to tap energy source Two or more serious hits to the head within days of each other can interfere with the brain’s ability to use sugar – its primary energy source – to repair cells damaged by the injuries, new research suggests. The brain’s ability to use energy is critical after an injury. In animal studies, Ohio State University [...]The post Danger of repeat head injuries: Brain’s inability to tap energy source appeared first on PsyPost.
New tools in fight against virus that attacks the brain Researchers have developed new insight into a rare but deadly brain infection, called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). This disease – which is caused by the JC virus – is most frequently found in people with suppressed immune systems and, until now, scientists have had no effective way to study it or test new treatments. “The [...]The post New tools in fight against virus that attacks the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
With rewards, we remember more than we should A new study provides an illustration of the power that reward has over learning and memory. In an experiment reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, mere sips of apple juice overcame a well-documented phenomenon in psychology known as “retrieval-induced forgetting” — RIF. Say you’ve been presented some simple facts from two [...]The post With rewards, we remember more than we should appeared first on PsyPost.
Growth factor regenerates damaged nerves without sprouting new blood vessels Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have found that a growth factor can regenerate damaged peripheral nerves without causing the growth of new blood vessels — making it a unique candidate to treat nerve damage in areas of the body where the proliferation of blood vessels would be a drawback. [...]The post Growth factor regenerates damaged nerves without sprouting new blood vessels appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Get Your Kids to Listen the First Time Feeling ignored by your kids? Try these 7 steps to teach your kids to listen to you the first time, without yelling or nagging
10 Things Depression Doesn’t Want You To Know! Hello, my name is depression. You know me by many different names, including dysthymic disorder, bipolar disorder, major depression and so forth. I am an insidious in nature, sneaking up on you when you least expect it. If left unchecked, I grow in power and have the ability to bring...
Til Death Do Us Part: Coping with Commitment after Are we still married after the death of one partner? “Til death do us part” is a part of all traditional marriage ceremonies, but I can’t help but wonder if it is really true. Do our vows — and our relationships — really end at death? Do we really “part”...
#125 What Could I Have Learned From a Daughter? I would have loved a daughter. My fourth son was born when I was 37 and I knew we were done. Odds are that my fifth child would have been a boy—well-loved to be sure but not a daughter. I have given a lot of thought to how I would...
Ceasing and Arising Ceasing and arising – two words for one and the same self-renewing flow of reality. Psychology of pratitya-samutpada (dependent origination) is the psychology of acceptance of What Is.  ...
Policing Mental Illness Crisis (Video) A brief documentary on Crisis Intervention Teams for mental illness in policing....
Major brain pathway rediscovered after century-old confusion, controversy A couple of years ago a scientist looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising. A large, fiber pathway that seemed to be part of the network of connections that process visual information showed up on the scans, but the researcher couldn’t find it mentioned in any of the modern-day anatomy [...]The post Major brain pathway rediscovered after century-old confusion, controversy appeared first on PsyPost.
Most people would rather harm themselves than others for profit A UCL-led experiment on 80 pairs of adults found that people were willing to sacrifice on average twice as much money to spare a stranger pain than to spare themselves, despite the decision being secret. The study, conducted by researchers from UCL (University College London) and Oxford University and funded by the Wellcome Trust, was [...]The post Most people would rather harm themselves than others for profit appeared first on PsyPost.
A new genetic cause for a progressive form of epilepsy identified A study led by researchers at University of Helsinki, Finland and Universities of Melbourne and South Australia has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaborative effort have been published today, 17 November 2014, in Nature Genetics. Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME) are rare, inherited, and usually childhood-onset [...]The post A new genetic cause for a progressive form of epilepsy identified appeared first on PsyPost.
Setting family rules promotes healthier behavior in children Who says your kids don’t listen to you? An Indiana University study has found that setting specific family rules about healthy eating and sedentary behavior actually leads to healthier practices in children. Data analyzed for the study was originally part of a data set used to evaluate the Wellborn Baptist Foundation’s HEROES program, a K-12 [...]The post Setting family rules promotes healthier behavior in children appeared first on PsyPost.
Finding ‘lost’ languages in the brain An infant’s mother tongue creates neural patterns that the unconscious brain retains years later even if the child totally stops using the language, (as can happen in cases of international adoption) according to a new joint study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro and McGill University’s Department of Psychology. [...]The post Finding ‘lost’ languages in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
New mechanisms related to addiction: Oxycodone impairs behavioral flexibility Brief usage of the painkiller oxycodone may impair behavioral flexibility even after that use ends, suggesting impaired decision-making as an enduring consequence of exposure, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 17 in the journal Learning and Memory. The Mount Sinai study investigated behavioral flexibility, [...]The post New mechanisms related to addiction: Oxycodone impairs behavioral flexibility appeared first on PsyPost.
Fruit flies learn from others Fruit flies do not always conform to the norm. When female fruit flies have to decide where to lay their eggs, they take their lead from what they see most others in their group do. However, some do take their personal preferences into account. So says Marine Battesti of the Université Paris-Sud in France, lead [...]The post Fruit flies learn from others appeared first on PsyPost.
Simple clinical tests help differentiate Parkinson’s disease from atypical parkinsonism Two simple tests conducted during the neurological exam can help clinicians differentiate between early-stage Parkinson’s disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. By asking patients to perform a tandem gait test and inquiring whether they are still able to ride a bicycle, clinicians can ascertain whether medio-lateral balance is impaired, a defining characteristic of atypical parkinsonism. These [...]The post Simple clinical tests help differentiate Parkinson’s disease from atypical parkinsonism appeared first on PsyPost.
Finding 'lost' languages in the brain: Far-reaching implications for unconscious role of infant experiences An infant's mother tongue creates neural patterns that the unconscious brain retains years later even if the child totally stops using the language, as can happen in cases of international adoption, according to a new joint study. The study offers the first neural evidence that traces of the "lost" language remain in the brain.