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Mother's soothing presence makes pain go away, changes gene activity in infant brain A mother's 'TLC' not only can help soothe pain in infants, but it may also impact early brain development by altering gene activity in a part of the brain involved in emotions, according to a new study.
The Silent Treatment And What You Can Do To The silent treatment is a favorite abusive tactic of infantile narcissists and bullies. What can you do about it?...
Consciousness Is a Brain Process Debate continues on whether consciousness operates in brains, in non-material souls, or in anything capable of integrating information. Rapid progress is being made on the neural mechanisms responsible for consciousness.
What Does Your Habits Manifesto Look Like? Writing a personal manifesto is a great exercise for clarifying your thinking — and it’s also a creative, absorbing process. I’ve written my Twelve Personal Commandments, and I also collect Secrets of Adulthood, which aren’t manifestos but are related to the same impulse. As I’ve been writing Better Than Before, my book about how...
Psychoanalytic Theory in One Sentence What strategies do you use to maintain the illusion that you are only some of the things you are?
Brain receptor cell could be new target for Alzheimer's Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers.
Home cooks eat better — and fewer calories when they eat out Study shows home cooks have a mindfulness of healthy and nutrient dense meal preparation along with portion control, and maintain these qualities when dining outside the home.
Unattractive men look better to women on the pill Picking a partner while on the pill might have lasting ramifications on marital satisfaction, new research finds.
9 Things Every Parent with an Anxious Child Should Try As all the kids line up to go to school, your son, Timmy, turns to you and says, “I don’t want to take the bus. My stomach hurts. Please don’t make me go.” You cringe and think, Here we go again. What should be a simple morning routine explodes into...
The 4 Types of Sleep Schedules We All Fit Into Long-held beliefs about sleep schedules challenged: around half of all people are neither 'larks' or 'owls'. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Offline Learning: How The Mind Learns During Sleep What’s The Best Time of Day to be Creative? Like to Stay Up Late? Different Neural Structures Found in the Brains of Night Owls Why Some People Only Need Five Hours’ Sleep a Night Later School Start Times Improve Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Adolescents
How to Appeal to Single People Because I have been researching and writing about single life and solo living for so long, I am sometimes interviewed by trend-spotters and marketing firms about what single people want or how best to appeal to them. I respond not because I want to help them sell their products, but...
Building a Racially Just Society: Psychological Insights Michael Brown’s tragic death, the anguish of his family, and the turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri, are all salient reminders that the longstanding and seemingly intractable realities of unequal treatment, circumstance, and opportunity for African Americans – and for other communities of color – pose a difficult yet increasingly urgent challenge.
Acculturative stress found to be root cause of high depression rates in Latino youth Acculturative stress may explain, in part, why Indiana's Latino youth face an alarming disparity in depression and suicide rates when compared to their white counterparts, researchers say.
Mechanisms behind 'Mexican waves' in brain revealed by scientists Scientists have revealed the mechanisms that enable certain brain cells to persuade others to create ‘Mexican waves’ linked with cognitive function. Inhibitory neurons can vibrate and they are equipped with mechanisms that enable them to persuade networks of other neurons into imitating their vibrations -- setting off 'Mexican waves' in the brain. The scientists believe these collective, oscillating vibrations play a key role in cognitive function. Their research sheds light on how inhibitory neurons use different communication processes to excitatory neurons, which share information via an internal pulsing mechanism.
Best of Our Blogs: November 18, 2014 As colder, wetter — and for many, snowier — weather falls upon us, it’s tempting to snuggle up inside with a good book and maybe even some hot chocolate (yes, already!). Well, we definitely don’t discourage reading here at Psych Central! Consider adding these five top posts to your list...
How to Become Your True Self Social scientists have addressed one of the central questions of our lives: How do we become our best and truest self? The goals we set and the plans we make are critical, but how do we know whether we are pursuing the goals that will result in a meaningful and fulfilling life?
Evidence based debunking Fed up with futile internet arguments, a bunch of psychologists investigated how best to correct false ideas. Tom Stafford discovers how to debunk properly. We all resist changing our beliefs about the world, but what happens when some of those beliefs are based on misinformation? Is there a right way to correct someone when they […]
Self-Development – Suggestions for How To Continually Grow and Change I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, “I love Half Price Books!” This past weekend, I bought a $65.00 book for $1.00 (actually, with my educator’s discount, it was 90 cents)! In this case, it’s a book I’ve been waiting for a while to get my hands on – FYI: For Your Improvement. […]
Survivors of Suicide Loss: Healing Through Care and Connection Saturday November 22, 2014 is International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day. In the United States, the latest evidence reports that 40,600 people died of suicide in 2012 and the number has been increasing. More Americans die from suicide than from car accidents. It is the second leading cause of death...
Starting a Counseling Practice Part 2: Giving yourself permission Hope you enjoyed really getting to know yourself in Starting a Counseling Practice Part 1. The truth is, getting honest with yourself is only the first step in creating and implementing a great private practice vision. You also have to give yourself permission. I know there are people out there...