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A Guide to Practicing Self-Acceptance For those of us who have spent a lifetime rejecting our inner experiences, it’s not easy to change. When we form long-term habits of doing that, it can seem like a Sisyphean task to change and start practicing healthier responses. But experts in the field have found effective ways to...
Suicide: Treatment for Suicidal Thoughts Chato Stewart: “I MEANT Business Plan!” Mental Health Tech: T-shirt psych ward (door Psychiatrist Office) Caption: NOTE to self: Listen to the whole question before I answer (my therapist). When you tell your doctor you have a plan, make sure he knows it not a suicide plan!   Suicide Holiday|Suicide Ideation|Suicidal thoughts...
7 Tips on How to Survive Christmas Dinner I’m just gonna cut straight to the chase. Christmas dinner can be ROUGH. Once you sit down with your loved ones, it is game time. Here are seven tips to help get through the Christmas feast, or fiasco, or whatever you want to call it: One: Being put on the...
From disgust to deceit: A shorter path than you might think Feeling queasy? How about deceitful? New research shows feelings of disgust encourage unethical, self-interested behaviours such as lying to get more money. At first look, these findings would suggest that feelings of disgust are to be avoided (such as dealing with that mouldy food container in the work fridge before the holiday break). On deeper [...]The post From disgust to deceit: A shorter path than you might think appeared first on PsyPost.
Little evidence brain games boost intelligence or prevent dementia Computerized brain games that are advertised as a way to help boost intelligence and prevent dementia will be popular Christmas gifts this year. But there’s little scientific evidence to support these industry claims, experts say.
Study finds that employees who are open about religion are happier It may be beneficial for employers to not only encourage office Christmas parties but also celebrate holidays and festivals from a variety of religions, according to a Kansas State University researcher. Sooyeol Kim, doctoral student in psychological sciences, was involved in a collaborative study that found that employees who openly discuss their religious beliefs at [...]The post Study finds that employees who are open about religion are happier appeared first on PsyPost.
Migraine may double risk for facial paralysis Migraine headache may double the risk of a nervous system condition that causes facial paralysis, called Bell’s palsy, according to a new study published in the December 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Bell’s palsy affects between 11 and 40 per 100,000 people each year. Most [...]The post Migraine may double risk for facial paralysis appeared first on PsyPost.
Unpacking brain damage in ALS Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the [...]The post Unpacking brain damage in ALS appeared first on PsyPost.
Combining social media and behavioral psychology could lead to more HIV testing Social media such as Twitter and Facebook can be valuable in the fight against HIV in the United States, where research has demonstrated they can prompt high-risk populations to request at-home testing kits for the virus that causes AIDS, suggesting a way to potentially boost testing rates. But does it lead to actual testing, and [...]The post Combining social media and behavioral psychology could lead to more HIV testing appeared first on PsyPost.
More than half of all children in the US will likely live with an unmarried mother More than half of all American children will likely live with an unmarried mother at some point before they reach age 18, according to a report issued by Princeton University and Harvard University. The absence of a biological father increases the likelihood that a child will exhibit antisocial behaviors like aggression, rule-breaking and delinquency, the [...]The post More than half of all children in the US will likely live with an unmarried mother appeared first on PsyPost.
Microbiome may have shaped early human populations We humans have an exceptional age structure compared to other animals: Our children remain dependent on their parents for an unusually long period and our elderly live an extremely long time after they have stopped procreating. Could the microscopic fellow travelers that consider the human body to be their home – collectively known as the [...]The post Microbiome may have shaped early human populations appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Master regulator’ gene — long tied to autism disorders — stimulates other genes in early brain development Chemical modifications to DNA’s packaging — known as epigenetic changes — can activate or repress genes involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and early brain development, according to a new study to be published in the journal Nature on Dec. 18. Biochemists from NYU Langone Medical Center found that these epigenetic changes in mice and [...]The post ‘Master regulator’ gene — long tied to autism disorders — stimulates other genes in early brain development appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Year-Ending Questions to Ask Yourself As one year ends, it’s important to take stock. That New Year’s resolution will never stick if you don’t.   So here are some questions to ask yourself about your mental health, your relationships, and your future.  Ready, set, go! (as my almost three-year-old loves to say.)1)  What’s my baseline mood state?...
NFL Injuries Leading to Medication Abuse NFL Injuries Leading to Medication Abuse Many people addicted to prescription medications do not think that they have a problem. These addictions often begin as an injury. Few realize how quickly dependency can spiral out of control. NFL injuries are treated with pain medications by team doctors. Are the players...
Gone but not Gone: Robin Williams’s Legacy of Love, Robin Williams died long before the winter chill settled in, but there is a new movie coming out this Christmas that will feature him once again. When I saw the trailer for “Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb” with Robin Williams playing Theodore Roosevelt and being his usual...
Pitt team publishes new findings from mind-controlled robot arm project In another demonstration that brain-computer interface technology has the potential to improve the function and quality of life of those unable to use their own arms, a woman with quadriplegia shaped the almost human hand of a robot arm with just her thoughts to pick up big and small boxes, a ball, an oddly shaped [...]The post Pitt team publishes new findings from mind-controlled robot arm project appeared first on PsyPost.
Personality outsmarts intelligence at school Recent research at Griffith University has found that personality is more important than intelligence when it comes to success in education. Dr Arthur Poropat from Griffith’s School of Applied Psychology has conducted the largest ever reviews of personality and academic performance. He based these reviews on the fundamental personality factors (Conscientiousness, Openness, Agreeableness, Emotional Stability, [...]The post Personality outsmarts intelligence at school appeared first on PsyPost.
Why some antidepressants may initially worsen symptoms New research helps explain a paradoxical effect of certain antidepressants–that they may actually worsen symptoms before helping patients feel better. The findings, highlighted in a paper publishing online December 17 in the Cell Press journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, may help investigators fix the problem as well as create new classes of drugs to treat [...]The post Why some antidepressants may initially worsen symptoms appeared first on PsyPost.
Certainty in our choices often a matter of time, researchers find When faced with making choices, but lack sufficient evidence to guarantee success, our brain uses elapsed time as a proxy for task difficulty to calculate how confident we should be, a team of neuroscientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the journal Neuron, help untangle the different factors that contribute to the decision-making process. [...]The post Certainty in our choices often a matter of time, researchers find appeared first on PsyPost.
From ecstasy to molly: What’s in a name when it comes to drug use? Molly is one of the most popular party drugs in the US. But what a lot of people may not know is that molly is actually a form of ecstasy (MDMA), and this misunderstanding can put young people at risk. Every year national surveys query teens and adults about ecstasy use. The data suggest its [...]The post From ecstasy to molly: What’s in a name when it comes to drug use? appeared first on PsyPost.