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Ten Steps to Learn Self-Discipline Here’s a brief recap of last week’s article, Self-Discipline Season Has Begun:  Struggling with self-discipline is not a sign of weakness or a character flaw Self-discipline is made up of two parts: making yourself do things you don’t want to do; and stopping yourself from doing things that you want...
Couple Communications: 5 Prerequisites to Unlock Imagination, 4 of To see yourself as captain is to, first, make a commitment to heal as an individual (see Prerequisite 1 above) and, second, to accept painful emotions as potentially vital information and view your ability to connect to vulnerable emotions without getting triggered as a strength (see Prerequisite 2 above). To...
4 Tips for Improving Self-Esteem Low self-esteem, which is just another term for shame, is very common in our culture. It especially afflicts those who grew up abused, neglected, or bereaved. Here are some simple tips for building confidence. 1. Be Fair Everyone suffers from flaws. It’s not fair to focus on our own personal...
7 Tips for a Saner Holiday As soon as autumn comes, people’s thoughts begin to shift to the holidays, and sometimes those thoughts are accompanied by difficult emotions such as depression, frustration, and anxiety. For some, the holidays conjure up unpleasant associations, such as the first event without Grandma there, or prickly family get-togethers. Then there...
Self-Care Sunday: A Tip for Practicing Self-Care Every Day In addition to sharing links to others’ posts on self-care (along with a few of my own) in these “Self-Care Sunday” posts, I also sometimes share a small tip or idea for taking kinder care of ourselves. Self-care is an attitude — of compassion toward ourselves. It’s asking ourselves “what’s...
How Comforting Are Comfort Foods? In what may have been one of the sweetest psychology experiments of all time, participants were asked about their favorite comfort foods – and then they were given them, in ample quantities! The researchers weren’t just being sweet; they wanted to know just how comforting comfort foods really are. Comfort...
What I Wish People Knew about Depression Someone recently asked me to write on what I wish people knew about depression, in light of Robin William’s suicide. Here’s my response. I wish people knew that depression is complex, that it is a physiological condition with psychological and spiritual components, and therefore can’t be forced into any neat...
Be Quick But Don’t Hurry Your pace can be key to success.
Compassion for our Elders Helping my mother in the last years of her life affected me deeply. My elderly aunt’s recent health problems have given me a second chance to be of service.
Childhood adversity hinders genetic protection against problem drinking in white men While the influence of heritable factors on the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) has been documented in family pedigree and twin studies for decades, identification of specific genetic variants that influence AUDs continues to be challenging. The ADH1B gene has consistently been implicated in problem drinking, but rarely incorporated into gene/environment investigations of alcohol [...]The post Childhood adversity hinders genetic protection against problem drinking in white men appeared first on PsyPost.
Trans fat consumption is linked to diminished memory in working-aged adults High trans fat consumption is linked to worse memory among working-age men, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014. In a recent study of approximately 1,000 healthy men, those who consumed the most trans fats showed notably worse performance on a word memory test. The strength of the association remained [...]The post Trans fat consumption is linked to diminished memory in working-aged adults appeared first on PsyPost.
7 Ways for Those with Dysthymia to Get the I’m a deep thinker, a creative type — and a dysthymic. As in: a person with dysthymia, officially known as Persistent Depressive Disorder, characterized by feeling “down” on a regular basis without reaching the level of near-total impairment associated with major depressive disorder. The sense of depression is at its...
Is schizophrenia a ‘real’ illness? In an attempt to move away from the traditional language used to describe psychosis and schizophrenia, the British Psychological Society (BPS) has launched an update to its thinking on this issue. The foreword of the report it has published sets out the vision: We hope that in future, services will no longer insist that service [...]The post Is schizophrenia a ‘real’ illness? appeared first on PsyPost.
3652 days Mind Hacks is exactly 10 years old today. Here’s the first post where Matt announced that the book had started shipping. This is the 4950th post and Mind Hacks has been going for 3652 days which means we’ve published an average of 1.4 posts a day, every day, for the last 10 years. Apart from […]
Stanford biologists explore link between memory deficit and misfiring circadian clock Anyone who has struggled with a foggy brain while adjusting to daylight saving time knows first-hand how an out-of-sync circadian clock can impair brain function. Now, by manipulating the circadian clocks of Siberian hamsters, Stanford scientists may have identified a brain structure that disrupts memory when circadian rhythms fall apart, as they often do in [...]The post Stanford biologists explore link between memory deficit and misfiring circadian clock appeared first on PsyPost.
New genetic cause for rare form of epilepsy identified An international research team that includes the University of Melbourne’s Professor Sam Berkovic (AC) has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaboration have been published in Nature Genetics. Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME) are rare, inherited, and usually childhood-onset neurodegenerative diseases whose core symptoms are epileptic seizures and [...]The post New genetic cause for rare form of epilepsy identified appeared first on PsyPost.
Family ties that bind: Having the right surname sets you up for life If your surname reveals that you descended from the “in” crowd in the England of 1066—the Norman Conquerors—then even now you are more likely than the average Brit to be upper class. To a surprising degree, the social status of your ancestors many generations in the past still exerts an influence on your life chances, [...]The post Family ties that bind: Having the right surname sets you up for life appeared first on PsyPost.
Readying the neural network: Study examines extrasynaptic neurotransmitter receptors Synapse, the name for the signal-receiving site on a neuron, comes from the Greek word for contact. Neuroscientists used to maintain that neurons form one-to-one relationship to contact one another. Yet more researchers are finding evidence that shows how neurons function as part of a network. An incoming excitation does not always provoke an outgoing [...]The post Readying the neural network: Study examines extrasynaptic neurotransmitter receptors appeared first on PsyPost.
YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder use a popular social media website like YouTube to provide and receive naturally occurring peer support, Dartmouth researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE. “What we found most surprising about our findings was that people with severe mental illness were so open [...]The post YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness appeared first on PsyPost.
Office stress? Workers may wait before acting out Employers know that dramatic changes in the workplace, such as the start of the “busy season” or a new, more demanding boss, can cause employees to act out in ways that hurt the bottom line. But a new study suggests that companies may be underestimating the impact of such behavior because they assume it only [...]The post Office stress? Workers may wait before acting out appeared first on PsyPost.