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A Foolish, Foolish Man There are undoubtedly many untold stories about Bill Cosby that have not yet come to light. Here is one of them, about a time when the famous comedian allegedly came on to a high school student.
A Foolish Foolish Man There are undoubtedly many untold stories about Bill Cosby that have not yet come to light. Here is one of them, about a time when the famous comedian allegedly came on to a high school student. Implications for a theory of foolishness, not to mention the morality of Cosby and his advisers, are discussed.
Do Others Opinions of Us Really Matter? One of our more enduring social fallacies is the idea that what others think of us actually matters. While this notion clearly has primal evolutionary roots, the shift from survival instinct to social imperative has become one of our greatest obstacles to self-acceptance.
A Kinder Take on New Year’s Resolutions for 2015 This time of year inspires us to be “out with the old and in with the new.” Is it a healthy path to take or are we caught in the self-improvement vortex? Perhaps it is our restlessness, our lack of self acceptance and our inability to be with what is...
Reducing Post-Romantic Stress in Two Ways Regardless of whether they are young or old, if you ask partners about their Honeymoon, you hear and see a spark of that romantic excitement that makes time together magical when you have found that special someone to love. The mutuality of sexual desire and wish to please make the...
5 Prerequisites to Unlock Your Communications — Re-Image Your Certain prerequisite shifts in your perception are essential to unlock your imagination to work for you in creating a healthy, vibrant love relationship. To summarize the first four: Prerequisite 1 (see Part 2) is to make a commitment to heal as individuals, each participating fully in your own and other’s healing processes. Your relationship will make you...
The Emotion Which Drives People To Work The Hardest People prone to this emotion work the hardest. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Powerful People Feel Taller Than They Really Are How to Use Psychology to Succeed at Work The Positive Effect of Creative Hobbies on Performance at Work The Emotion Which Lasts 240 Times Longer Than Others Cyberloafing at Work Makes You More Productive
Early intervention could change nature of schizophrenia Intervening early has the potential to both save money and avert suffering for those with schizophrenia.
Adding Power to Your New Year’s Resolutions I’ve lost interest in New Year’s resolutions. I’ve long since lost the “rah-rah-rah” energy for deciding something, trying to be a new kind of me, with better results in the world out there — thinner, kinder, richer, organized, highly successful, time for everyone and never missing a yoga class. And...
In 2015, I Resolve To … So here it is. My last post of 2014. And this is the last day of 2014, New Year’s Eve day. And today is traditionally the day that New Year’s Resolutions are made. And boy aren’t we good at making those resolutions. We don’t typically wait until New Year’s to...
My Most Unpopular Cartoon in 2014 Last week’s cartoon was about trading off food for exercise, hoping that life is fair that way. (It isn’t.) All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2015.  My main cartoon site is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And  you can Like me  on Facebook to get notified of new...
A new year with an old friend I’ve just found a curious article in the scientific journal Clinical Anatomy which reprints a Victorian story called ‘Celebrating new year in Bart’s dissecting room’ where the corpses come to life. It finishes with some interesting observations about the psychological impact of dissecting a dead body as a rite of passage for medical students. The […]
10 Things That Cloak Incompetent Therapists When I meet with clients and their families, I often hear the following comment over and over again: “I did not like the previous therapist.” A barrage of negatives often follows this statement such as “she was controlling,” “he was crazy,” or “she did not help me.” It can be...
Top 14 Weightless Posts of 2014 Every year I share the most popular posts (as judged by pageviews) on Weightless from January to December. This year’s favorite posts include everything from dealing with a loud inner critic to coping with guilt after eating to 10 reasons to love our bodies. Overall, 2014 was all about exploring...
When Our Bodies Lose Track of the Time Internal circadian rhythms stay synchronized with external clock time because environmental factors such as light and meals align the rhythm with the external clock. If these cues are unavailable the circadian rhythm will steadily shift over time. For totally blind individuals this can result in problems such as insomnia and daytime sleepiness.
How can we move away from mental health clinics that are dark, sad and scary? The first psychology training placement I ever had was treating adults who had depression and anxiety. The building I worked in was in Archway, north London, near the notorious ‘suicide bridge’. The clinic was based in an old hospital and the service was due to be moved. It was one of the most depressing and [...]The post How can we move away from mental health clinics that are dark, sad and scary? appeared first on PsyPost.
Molecular network identified underlying autism spectrum disorders Researchers in the United States have identified a molecular network that comprises many of the genes previously shown to contribute to autism spectrum disorders. The findings provide a map of some of the crucial protein interactions that contribute to autism and will help uncover novel candidate genes for the disease. The results are published in [...]The post Molecular network identified underlying autism spectrum disorders appeared first on PsyPost.
Parental history of suicide attempt associated with increased risk in kids A suicide attempt by a parent increased the odds nearly 5-fold that a child would attempt suicide, according to a report published online by JAMA Psychiatry. Other studies have established that suicidal behavior can run in families but few studies have looked at the pathways by which suicidal behavior is transmitted in families. David A. [...]The post Parental history of suicide attempt associated with increased risk in kids appeared first on PsyPost.
Nature, nurture and time: Study finds genetic risks vary over history Nature and nurture have found a new companion — historical context. A new study has produced the best evidence yet that the role of genetics in complex traits, including obesity, varies over time. Both the era in which scientific research is conducted and the era in which subjects were born may have an impact on [...]The post Nature, nurture and time: Study finds genetic risks vary over history appeared first on PsyPost.
Children with autism who live with pets are more assertive Dogs and other pets play an important role in individuals’ social lives, and they can act as catalysts for social interaction, previous research has shown. Although much media attention has focused on how dogs can improve the social skills of children with autism, a University of Missouri researcher recently found that children with autism have [...]The post Children with autism who live with pets are more assertive appeared first on PsyPost.