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Natural ‘high’ could avoid chronic marijuana use Replenishing the supply of a molecule that normally activates cannabinoid receptors in the brain could relieve mood and anxiety disorders and enable some people to quit using marijuana, a Vanderbilt University study suggests. Cannabinoid receptors are normally activated by compounds in the brain called endocannabinoids, the most abundant of which is 2-AG. They also are [...]The post Natural ‘high’ could avoid chronic marijuana use appeared first on PsyPost.
The human eye can see ‘invisible’ infrared light Any science textbook will tell you we can’t see infrared light. Like X-rays and radio waves, infrared light waves are outside the visual spectrum. But an international team of researchers co-led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that under certain conditions, the retina can sense infrared light after [...]The post The human eye can see ‘invisible’ infrared light appeared first on PsyPost.
Science suggests intermittent fasting may have health benefits An eating schedule that involves "intermittent fasting" could help fight many related diseases of modern life, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's.
Skipping college makes young people more likely to abuse pain pills A study just released by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health compared the use of prescription opioids and stimulants among high school graduates, non-graduates, and their college-attending peers, and found that young adults who do not attend college are at particularly high risk for nonmedical prescription opioid use and disorder. In contrast, the nonmedical [...]The post Skipping college makes young people more likely to abuse pain pills appeared first on PsyPost.
Minute movements of autistic children and their parents provide clue to severity of disorder Imperceptible variations in movement patterns among individuals with autism spectrum disorder are important indicators of the severity of the disorder in children and adults, according to a report presented at the 2014 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in November. For the first time, researchers at Indiana University and Rutgers University report developing a quantitative way [...]The post Minute movements of autistic children and their parents provide clue to severity of disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers explore impact of traumatic brain injury on long-term memory Kessler Foundation researchers have authored a new article that provides insight into the variable impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on long-term memory. The article, “Working memory capacity links cognitive reserve with long-term memory in moderate to severe TBI: a translational approach,” was epublished ahead of print on October 7 in the Journal of Neurology [...]The post Researchers explore impact of traumatic brain injury on long-term memory appeared first on PsyPost.
#127 Mothers and Fathers and Daughters#2 Raising a daughter is more complicated than merely telling her that she can be anything she wants to be. It is important to tell her that, don’t get me wrong. But even in the 21st century, in the age of “lean in,” there are a thousand messages that place limits...
Bad Behavior in Public Places – Why? Last week’s cartoon was about family celebrations that turn into awkward confrontations. Especially those between mothers and dear daughters. All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2015.  My main cartoon site is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And  you can Like me  on Facebook to get notified of new...
Love Knows No Age! 5 Dating Tips for the Want to know where all the decent single men are hiding? Believe it or not, they are everywhere. I have some news that will both surprise and delight you. Want to know where all the quality single men are? They are everywhere. There are about 45 million single men over...
When Other People Don’t GET Your Illness I had a doctor’s appointment today. This doctor treats my body, she isn’t one of those that trips around my beautifully bipolar mind trying to figure out what the hell is going on and how the hell to fix it. She brought up my medications, asking if there were any changes,...
Diabetes in midlife linked to significant cognitive decline 20 years later People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new research suggests. The study is believed to be the longest of its kind following a cross-section of adults as they age.
Five Things Mental Strength and Lasting Love Have In We’ve all heard the stories. Mary and Bob have been married for over fifty years. Suzan and Joe just celebrated sixty years together. And we all think the same thing. How do they do it? Is there some magic formula here that the rest of us are missing? While it...
How to Learn The Secret of Life Airplane pilot: (GO! GO! GO!)  Chicken Bob: (Ready to jump laying eggs) Caption: “He who is not everyday conquering some fear”… is just making scramble eggs. Don’t Let Fear Get in the Way of Success “He who is not everyday conquering some fear has not learned the secret of life.” ~...
Is Your Man Gay, Straight or Bisexual? Dr. Joe Kort, author of 'Is My Husband Gay, Straight, or Bi? A Guide for Women Concerned About Their Men,' talks about his new book in a recent interview and explains how he determines whether or not a man is gay, and what drives homosexual men into therapy.
Can Serial Cheaters Change? A reader posted this question as to whether serial cheaters can change. In thinking about it I realized the answer is not a simple yes or no. Many factors enter into the prognosis for serial cheating such as the characteristics of the cheater, whether the cheating is part of an...
Brain folding study defines two distinct groups of mammals Programs that control the production of neurons during brain development determine how the brain folds, researchers report. The researchers analyzed the gyrencephaly index, indicating the degree of cortical folding, of 100 mammalian brains and identified a threshold value that separates mammalian species into two distinct groups: Those above the threshold have highly folded brains, whereas those below it have only slightly folded or unfolded brains. The research team also found that differences in cortical folding did not evolve linearly across species.
Chemical compound that decreases effects of multiple sclerosis found Multiple sclerosis is triggered when the immune system attacks the myelin sheath, the protective covering around the axons of nerve fibers. Currently available therapies are only partially effective in preventing the onset of permanent disability in MS patients. A research team has identified a compound that minimizes axon degeneration, reducing the rate and degree of MS progression. This chemical stimulates axon re-sheathing, restoring uninterrupted flow of nerve impulses.
Introducing Unleash Your Creativity Artists and creative people have unique emotional and psychological struggles as they grapple with creativity. There’s often a thin line between madness and mental health, and artists, writers and other creative people struggle with walking this line while keeping their lives together — and the creativity flowing. That’s why I’m...
Ethical Parenting: Parent-Child Conflict “I was a wonderful parent before I had children.” ~ Adele Faber. I remember when I became a parent. Within the first two years of parenting my child I became aware of this enormous sense of gratitude. My parents had come to visit and on one occasion and I pulled...
Here's How We Force Ourselves to Believe the Lie When you've finally made up your mind about something, do you want it unmade? Of course you don't, and whether you know it or not you make sure that everything in your brain stays the way you left it. This is where "selective exposure" comes in....