Article Description
Study: Beethoven’s own heartbeat may have inspired his most famous works Could it be that when Ludwig van Beethoven composed some of the greatest masterpieces of all time that he was quite literally following his heart? The striking rhythms found in some of Beethoven’s most famous works may have been inspired by his own heartbeat, says a team of researchers from the University of Michigan and [...]The post Study: Beethoven’s own heartbeat may have inspired his most famous works appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain scientists figure out how a protein crucial to learning and memory works Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical “clamp” that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger. The finding moves neuroscientists a step closer to figuring out how learning and memory work, and how problems with them can arise. A report [...]The post Brain scientists figure out how a protein crucial to learning and memory works appeared first on PsyPost.
Expressing anger linked with better health in some cultures In the US and many Western countries, people are urged to manage feelings of anger or suffer its ill effects — but new research with participants from the US and Japan suggests that anger may actually be linked with better, not worse, health in certain cultures. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal [...]The post Expressing anger linked with better health in some cultures appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds people who watch more TV understand nutrition less The holidays can be a time for binge watching TV shows or movies. According to a University of Houston (UH) researcher, all of those hours in front of the television may lead to increased snacking. A recent UH study conducted by professor Temple Northup suggests people who watch excessive amounts of TV tend to eat [...]The post Study finds people who watch more TV understand nutrition less appeared first on PsyPost.
Genetics in depression: What’s known, what’s next Even with modern genomewide analysis techniques, it has proven difficult to identify genetic factors affecting risk for depression, according to a topical review in the January issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. “Given the established heritability of depression, there is [...]The post Genetics in depression: What’s known, what’s next appeared first on PsyPost.
Major study sends clear safety message to prevent brain injury in children An exhaustive analysis of data from more than 40,000 cases of brain trauma in children – published by the authoritative New England Journal of Medicine – provides convincing evidence that protecting children in advance from head injuries is the key to reducing their severity. The new findings, obtained during one of the largest multi-center prospective [...]The post Major study sends clear safety message to prevent brain injury in children appeared first on PsyPost.
Showing My Scars Despite the negative comments that often appear here on my blog, I do get a lot of very personal and heartfelt emails from readers – so thank you for that. Often they thank me for sharing my story and giving them hope. I try. I am not sure if you...
A Call for Heroic Leadership As a leadership consultant, I often use a writing tool called the Hero’s Journey to explain the epic adventures that await leaders as they tackle tough challenges and opportunities to achieve greatness for their organizations. This is a brief overview of how the Hero’s Journey plays out in business and professional life.
Happy New Year?   I rise at 4 a.m. A new year brings many new expectations – by us, for us and from others for us. Living up to these expectations is a painful burden, one we should consider shirking.   As a college professor and single mother of three daughters in college,...
3 Steps to Empower Yourself Using Your Own Anger Do you struggle with with releasing anger and forgiving? “Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.” -Buddah Rare is the individual who doesn’t have feelings of anger or disappointment towards some...
6 Signs You Are In a Toxic Relationship Do you ever get the feeling that your great relationship may be not so great after all?  Do your girlfriends tell you your relationship has some red flags?  Are you starting to question if your relationship?   If you are wondering if your relationship is healthy, here are some signs that...
Researchers make new discoveries in key pathway for neurological diseases A new intermediate step and unexpected enzymatic activity in a metabolic pathway in the body, which could lead to new drug design for psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, has been discovered by researchers at Georgia State University. Their findings are published in the journal Nature Communications this week. The research team has been studying a metabolic [...]The post Researchers make new discoveries in key pathway for neurological diseases appeared first on PsyPost.
Large study on jealousy examines the impact of sexual vs. emotional infidelity In the largest study to date on infidelity, Chapman University has learned men and women are different when it comes to feeling jealous. In a poll of nearly 64,000 Americans this study provides the first large-scale examination of gender and sexual orientation differences in response to potential sexual versus emotional infidelity in U.S. adults. According [...]The post Large study on jealousy examines the impact of sexual vs. emotional infidelity appeared first on PsyPost.
Teens are influenced by caricatures of their peers’ sexual and drug-use behaviors It’s true: teens are misunderstood. But apparently, teens themselves have dramatic misperceptions about what their peers are doing when it comes to sex, drugs and studying, possibly prompting them to conform to social norms that don’t exist. That’s according to new research that shows adolescents overestimate the amount of drug- and alcohol-use and sexual behaviors [...]The post Teens are influenced by caricatures of their peers’ sexual and drug-use behaviors appeared first on PsyPost.
Muslims and Latinos much more prominent in TV crime news than in real-life crime If it seems as if most terrorists are Muslims and almost all immigrant lawbreakers are Latinos, it may be because you’re watching national TV news – not because those things are true. That’s one implication of a study of five years of network and cable crime news led by University of Illinois communication professor Travis [...]The post Muslims and Latinos much more prominent in TV crime news than in real-life crime appeared first on PsyPost.
Synthetic oil drug may bring promise for Huntington’s disease A synthetic triglyceride oil called triheptanoin may provide hope for people with Huntington’s disease, an early study suggests.
Study finds partisanship most fierce among highly educated Americans While an educated public is undoubtedly a crucial element to a democratic society, a new study by two University of Kansas professors has found that partisanship appears to be highest among the most educated Americans. “Though the facts may point in the opposite direction, highly educated partisans are fully capable of ignoring ‘uncomfortable’ facts and [...]The post Study finds partisanship most fierce among highly educated Americans appeared first on PsyPost.
Everyday Sociopathy: Is Your Friend Passive-Exploitive? Sociopaths are rare. Passive exploitives are everywhere, maybe in your own home, even in your own bed.
Morning haze: Why it’s time to stop hitting the snooze button It’s 6.30am and after a long holiday break, your alarm clock is insistently telling you it’s time to get out of bed. For many people – me included – the automatic reaction is to hit the snooze button, often more than once. But while it might feel like those extra minutes leave you more rested, morning snoozes [...]The post Morning haze: Why it’s time to stop hitting the snooze button appeared first on PsyPost.
In Tragedy, Putting Sports in Perspective When young people lose their lives in sports, it is a bracing slap in the face about why we are involved in sports and a reminder about what is really important (and it’s not the results!). Let’s honor them by keeping sports in perspective as a marvelous part of life, but not life itself.