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A beautiful thing called Choice “I can always choose, but I ought to know that if I do not choose, I am still choosing” (J.P. Sartre). There have been times in your life when you felt like there are no choices to be made or maybe you figured that because you cannot see additional possibilities,...
What if a Child’s Physical Illness was Treated like Mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) disorders in children have hit epidemic levels. In the U.S. alone, 1 in 8 children will suffer from an anxiety disorder, and 1 in 5 will experience an episode of depression by the age of eighteen. Although it’s true that kids who receive treatments such as therapy can overcome...
Possible genetic link found in treatment-related cognitive issues in children with leukemia Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to a research. The findings suggest the possibility of screening ALL patients for their risk of long-term treatment-related effects on memory, attention and learning and studying potential interventions.
Distraction, if consistent, does not hinder learning A new study challenges the idea that distraction is necessarily a problem for learning. Researchers found that if attention was as divided during recall of a motor task as it was during learning the task, people performed as if there were no distractions at either stage.
Brain tumor: Key found for suppression of growth in medulloblastomas A key factor that can suppress medulloblastoma, the most frequent child brain tumor, has been identified by researchers. Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its treatment remains inefficient. The work opens new perspectives on the diagnosis and treatment of these brain tumors with the discovery of a key factor called BCL6, able to suppress the growth of medulloblastomas in mice and in human tumor cells in culture.
Paying Attention to the Most Beautiful Details Last week I mentioned the power of paying attention to details. The details of our lives. The details of our surroundings. The details of our relationships. The details in the details. Writing my book has helped me notice the small yet big things of our lives, the things I used...
How to Overcome Fear of Water 46% of Americans are afraid of the deep-end of a pool. 37% are unable to swim, and almost 4000 a year die of drowning. How can we help the millions of fearful swimmers learn to enjoy the water safely? —We must address the fear first. Anyone who enters the pool overwhelmed by fear of embarrassment, failing, being out of control, or who goes into flight/fight mode, can't
New treatment strategy for epilepsy Researchers found out that the conformational defect in a specific protein causes autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy which is a form of familial epilepsy. They showed that treatment with chemical corrector called 'chemical chaperone' ameliorates increased seizure susceptibility in a mouse model of human epilepsy by correcting the conformational defect.
‘I Can’t Breathe:’ People with Mental Illness & the The outrage for no one being held accountable for Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the police — for selling cigarettes on the street, a petty crime at best — is pouring over. And it’s no wonder. The officers’ heavy-handed tactics in handling this nuisance crime were over-the-top. Garner...
The Amazing Effect of Mother’s Mere Presence on Infant Pain and Brain Development Wonderful influence of mother's presence on infants brain development and experience of pain. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Loving Touch is Critical for Premature Infants Family Problems In Childhood Affect Brain Development The Baby Illusion: Mothers Underestimate the Height of Their Youngest Child People’s Suprising Empathy With The Pain of Their Enemies Here is What The Brain Can Remember From Infancy (Even When Consciously It’s Gone)
America’s Affluent Teen Crisis The shocking research about Generation Stressed.
People with opioid dependence in recovery show 're-regulation' of reward systems Within a few months after drug withdrawal, patients in recovery from dependence on prescription pain medications may show signs that the body's natural reward systems are normalizing, reports a new study. In brain activity studies, patients with recent drug withdrawal showed heightened responses to drug-related cues, such as pictures of pills. In the extended-care patients, these increased responses to drug cues -- in a region of the brain called the prefrontal cortex, involved in attention and self-control -- were significantly reduced.
Reality and Imagination Flow In Opposite Directions in the Brain Above: Professor Barry Van Veen wearing an electrode net that measures brain activity. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:How The Brain Processes The Emotions Consciousness in Vegetative Patients Thought Beyond Hope Revealed by Active Brain Networks Unique Human Brain Area Identified that Separates Us From Monkeys Electrical Brain Stimulation Can Instantly Improve Self-Control Playing Games Increases Brain Size
Sleep disturbance linked to amyloid in brain areas affected by Alzheimer's disease Disturbed sleep could be an early target in preventing cognitive deficits later in life according to a study. Amyloid, a protein which is elevated in the brains of Alzheimer's Disease patients, was found in higher concentrations in the brains of healthy research patients who reported being sleepy and less rested. Higher amyloid in these regions has been linked to sleep disturbances.
Stroke: Neuro-rehabilitation helps patients cope with loss of motor function The majority of patients who survive a stroke usually continue to suffer from permanent motor disorders (hemiparesis) or a linguistic handicap (aphasia). A new study reveals an improvement in the efficiency of the brain activity when patients receive a treatment combining motor revalidation with non-invasive brain stimulation. These results were demonstrated via the technique of functional MRI.
Best of Our Blogs: December 9, 2014 Perhaps there is no other time than the holidays that exhibits such dichotomy in the way things should be and the way things really are. The season signals a shared ritual of giving and goodwill in its jovial music, decorations and opportunities to give back. Yet, it’s also the time...
Love is sweet: Taste can influence our romantic perceptions, study finds Calling your loved one a “sweetie” may be more than just a metaphor. New research has found that tasting something sweet influences people’s thoughts about romance. “There is a new developing area in psychology, and the literature suggests that the metaphors we use in our language can influence psychological processes, attitudes, and behaviors,” the study’s [...]The post Love is sweet: Taste can influence our romantic perceptions, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Can you see these optical illusions? Can you see what I see? We all experience things subjectively, including how we perceive optical illusions.The post Can you see these optical illusions? appeared first on PsyPost.
Top Five New Years’ Resolutions from the Wisdom of 2014 has been a year of travel for me. I found myself flying domestically and internationally very often, and taking long cab rides to and from airports. If you travel much, you know that most taxi drivers do not notice much about their passengers, but there is a small group...
Enhance Giving: Recognize the Connection Between Giving and Receiving The Holiday Season has always been about giving. It is reflected both in terms of gifts given to family and friends and increasingly in terms of generosity of action and spirit to those we love and to those in need. What about the other side of giving–What about receiving? Do...