Article Description
The Power of Online Presence: Facebook Brings Australian Parenting   Discover how some very successful mental health professionals use blogging, social media, and other technologies as powerful tools for their therapy practices. Elly Taylor, AARC, is an Australian Relationship Counsellor, Parenthood Researcher and advocate for emotional health. She teaches parents and professionals about the eight stages of early parenthood following pregnancy so...
Online students give instructors higher marks if they think instructors are men A new study shows that college students in online courses give better evaluations to instructors they think are men – even when the instructor is actually a woman. “The ratings that students give instructors are really important, because they’re used to guide higher education decisions related to hiring, promotions and tenure,” says Lillian MacNell, lead [...]The post Online students give instructors higher marks if they think instructors are men appeared first on PsyPost.
Debunking Flu Shot Myths Makes Some Less Likely To Get Vaccinated Only 42 percent of adults in the U.S. get their flu shots. A key reason for this low number is the misconception that you can catch the flu from the vaccine. But, a recent study found that, when vaccine-fearing patients heard the real facts from their doctors, they were actually more reluctant to get their flu shots....
Abandoning websites: Annoying ads are bad for business Most consumers have experienced online ads so garish, loud, or aggravating that they can’t possibly be ignored. But a new study in the Journal of Marketing Research suggests that this way of forcing customer’s attention may actually be bad for business. “Annoying ads are interesting because they both make and cost money for publishers. They [...]The post Abandoning websites: Annoying ads are bad for business appeared first on PsyPost.
Twitter posts may shine a fresh light on mental illness trends Johns Hopkins computers scientists, who have already used Twitter posts to track flu cases, say their techniques also show promise as a tool to gather important information about some common mental illnesses. By reviewing tweets from users who publicly mentioned their diagnosis and by looking for language cues linked to certain disorders, the researchers say, [...]The post Twitter posts may shine a fresh light on mental illness trends appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links ADHD, conduct disorder with alcohol and tobacco use in young teens A new study links ADHD and conduct disorder in young adolescents with increased alcohol and tobacco use. The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center study is among the first to assess such an association in this age group. Conduct disorder is a behavioral and emotional disorder marked by aggressive, destructive or deceitful behavior. The study is [...]The post Study links ADHD, conduct disorder with alcohol and tobacco use in young teens appeared first on PsyPost.
E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes for former smokers and this could help improve understanding of how various nicotine delivery devices lead to dependence, according to researchers. “We found that e-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than tobacco cigarettes in a large sample of long-term users,” said Jonathan Foulds, professor of public health [...]The post E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes appeared first on PsyPost.
​It doesn’t add up: People who say they are good at math, but aren’t Thinking you’re good at math and actually being good at it are not the same thing, new research has found. About one in five people who say they are bad at math in fact score in the top half of those taking an objective math test. But one-third of people who say they are good [...]The post ​It doesn’t add up: People who say they are good at math, but aren’t appeared first on PsyPost.
Laughing gas for depression? Nitrous oxide shows early promise as a potential treatment Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don’t respond to standard therapies. The pilot study, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is believed to be the first research in which patients with depression were given laughing gas. In 20 [...]The post Laughing gas for depression? Nitrous oxide shows early promise as a potential treatment appeared first on PsyPost.
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Me, and a Baby-to-Be It started with plumbing.  And no, I’m not using a cute term for my genitourinary anatomy.  I mean actual plumbing.  When I was pregnant with my second child, I became obsessed with the idea that our house had leaking pipes everywhere.  I was absolutely convinced that I would wake up one morning...
Can You Hear Your Body’s Song Of Emotion? Do you listen to your body? Do you understand what its messages? Miriam Manela of Thrive OT suggests we listen without judgment, without shaming or blaming....
Your Beliefs About Change Affect Admitting Responsibility In any relationship, there are times that you don’t do the right thing. You brush off a colleague. You snap at a romantic partner. You do things that are selfish. In order to repair the relationship, though, you need to take some responsibility. By taking responsibility, you can work to change yourself to improve the relationship in the future.
When Things Don’t Turn Out How You’d Hoped, Expected Maybe you took a job that was supposed to be fulfilling, but you dread going to work. Maybe you studied intensely for many months but still didn’t pass the bar. Maybe you thought you’d be married by now, but you aren’t even dating anyone. Maybe you poured your heart into...
Why Emotionally Troubled Bosses Continue To Thrive Much of our cultural view of "success" in life and career is rooted in values and behavior that can create emotional conflicts for many - including debilitating trade-offs, anger and feelings of self-betrayal. New research sheds light on the role played by managers who are abusive to employees, and those who are insecure and reject helpful feedback by employees.
The Effect of Stigma Against People Diagnosed with Mental "Quirky" or "mentally ill"? Why should the fact of a diagnosis define how we are perceived?...
A beautiful thing called Choice “I can always choose, but I ought to know that if I do not choose, I am still choosing” (J.P. Sartre). There have been times in your life when you felt like there are no choices to be made or maybe you figured that because you cannot see additional possibilities,...
What if a Child’s Physical Illness was Treated like Mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) disorders in children have hit epidemic levels. In the U.S. alone, 1 in 8 children will suffer from an anxiety disorder, and 1 in 5 will experience an episode of depression by the age of eighteen. Although it’s true that kids who receive treatments such as therapy can overcome...
Possible genetic link found in treatment-related cognitive issues in children with leukemia Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to a research. The findings suggest the possibility of screening ALL patients for their risk of long-term treatment-related effects on memory, attention and learning and studying potential interventions.
Distraction, if consistent, does not hinder learning A new study challenges the idea that distraction is necessarily a problem for learning. Researchers found that if attention was as divided during recall of a motor task as it was during learning the task, people performed as if there were no distractions at either stage.
Brain tumor: Key found for suppression of growth in medulloblastomas A key factor that can suppress medulloblastoma, the most frequent child brain tumor, has been identified by researchers. Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its treatment remains inefficient. The work opens new perspectives on the diagnosis and treatment of these brain tumors with the discovery of a key factor called BCL6, able to suppress the growth of medulloblastomas in mice and in human tumor cells in culture.