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E-cigarettes 'help smokers quit or cut down' E-cigarettes appear to help smokers cut down but some say they are creating a new generation of addicts.
Most U.S. doctors now support assisted suicide Survey shows for the first time most U.S. doctors back the rights of patients with an "incurable illness" to seek "a dignified death."
Educating first responders across U.S. on autism safety A retired police officer has made it his mission to educate first responders and others about how to more effectively interact with people with autism spectrum disorder.
New technology advances eye tracking as biomarker for brain function and brain injury Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed new technology that can assess the location and impact of a brain injury merely by tracking the eye movements of patients as they watch music videos for less than four minutes, according to a study published Friday on-line in the Journal of Neurosurgery. The study suggests that [...]The post New technology advances eye tracking as biomarker for brain function and brain injury appeared first on PsyPost.
Political extremists may be less susceptible to common cognitive bias People who occupy the extreme ends of the political spectrum, whether liberal or conservative, may be less influenced by outside information on a simple estimation task than political moderates, according to newresearch published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research, conducted by psychological scientists Mark J. Brandt and Anthony [...]The post Political extremists may be less susceptible to common cognitive bias appeared first on PsyPost.
How to survive emotionally during the holidays Spending time with family during the holidays can lead to stress and resentment.
Naming people and objects in baby’s first year may offer learning benefits years later In a follow-up to her earlier studies of learning in infancy, developmental psychologist Lisa Scott and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are reporting that talking to babies in their first year, in particular naming things in their world, can help them make connections between what they see and hear, and these learning benefits [...]The post Naming people and objects in baby’s first year may offer learning benefits years later appeared first on PsyPost.
Meth users face substantially higher risk for getting Parkinson’s disease In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson’s disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows. The researchers also observed that women who use methamphetamine may be nearly five [...]The post Meth users face substantially higher risk for getting Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Teen contraband smokers more likely to use illicit drugs: Study A University of Alberta economics professor has discovered a link between contraband cigarette use and illicit drug use among Canadian teens. Professor Mesbah Sharaf, a health economics lecturer at the University of Alberta in Canada, recently published a joint study with the University of Waterloo titled “Association Between Contraband Tobacco and Illicit Drug Use Among [...]The post Teen contraband smokers more likely to use illicit drugs: Study appeared first on PsyPost.
Introverts could shape extroverted co-workers’ career success, OSU study shows Introverted employees are more likely to give low evaluations of job performance to extroverted co-workers, giving introverts a powerful role in workplaces that rely on peer-to-peer evaluation tools for awarding raises, bonuses or promotions, new research shows. Introverts consistently rated extroverted co-workers as worse performers, and were less likely to give them credit for work [...]The post Introverts could shape extroverted co-workers’ career success, OSU study shows appeared first on PsyPost.
Certain parenting tactics could lead to materialistic attitudes in adulthood With the holiday season in full swing and presents piling up under the tree, many parents may be tempted to give children all the toys and gadgets they ask for or use the expectation of gifts to manage children’s behavior. Now, a new study from the University of Missouri and the University of Illinois at [...]The post Certain parenting tactics could lead to materialistic attitudes in adulthood appeared first on PsyPost.
US children are safer, better-educated, and fatter American children are generally safer and better-educated than they have been in 20 years, a new report from Duke University finds. Stubborn problems remain, including high rates of child poverty and a still-raging obesity epidemic, the 2014 National Child and Youth Well-Being Index Report notes. But “compared to 20 years ago, U.S. children are doing [...]The post US children are safer, better-educated, and fatter appeared first on PsyPost.
How, where the brain converts external inputs into behavioral responses Very little is known about how and where the brain converts external inputs into behavioral responses. Now, scientists have been able to shed light on important neural circuitry involved in the prey capture behavior exhibited by young zebrafish.
New technology advances eye tracking as biomarker for brain function, recovery from brain injury A new technology has been developed that can assess the location and impact of a brain injury merely by tracking the eye movements of patients as they watch music videos for less than four minutes. The study suggests that the use of eye tracking technology may be a potential biological marker for assessing brain function and monitoring recovery for patients with brain injuries.
What's a Healthier Option Than Mainstream News? No one needs a research study to know that mainstream news generally consists of negative news. For example, the nightly news or morning paper will tell you about a train that derailed but not the thousands of trains that didn't. Especially if you're prone to anxiety, watching or reading mainstream news can be fear and anxiety inducing. Why does this matter?
Uncovering Happiness: Four Questions that Can Transform Your Life When it comes to our self-critical thinking, Byron Katie has created a brilliant set of four questions to free us from our negative depressive minds. For example, if you say, “I’m such  an idiot,” we ask 1) Is it true? 2) Is it absolutely true? 3) What happens when you believe...
The Impacts of Narcissism Narcissistic people can ruin the lives of their families and lovers. I interviewed many people who were in or recovering from these relationships. Here are some of their thoughts.
You Can’t Please Everyone I’ve had an interesting couple of weeks. I’ve been talking to an agent about a book proposal. The book is already written, but in talking to the agent I’ve come to realize that in order for him to take me on as a client, I would need to entirely rewrite...
People trust typical-looking faces most Being 'average' is often considered a bad thing, but new research suggests that averageness wins when people assess the trustworthiness of a face. The research indicates that, while typical-looking faces aren't seen as the most attractive, they are considered to be the most trustworthy.
A Successful Opera Career In Spite of Her Voice Magda’s fans bootlegged her recordings for decades and adored her with such passion, police had to stop them from dashing onto the stage. Opera lovers are usually very discriminating about vocal quality, but not Magda’s fans. So what kept them enthralled—her enthusiasm? Her sparkle?