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People prefer fair, but does the brain? Whether for oneself or for others, fairness is preferred by people, but the brain network changes depending on who is actually benefiting. "In previous studies," explains the lead investigator, "we found the same tendency to reject unfair offers regardless of whether the decision involved the subjects themselves or a third party. Brain imaging, however, suggested that the brain was working differently in the two situations."
Development of psychosis: Gray matter loss and the inflamed brain The thickness of cortical brain tissue progressively reduces as individuals develop psychosis, according to researchers of a large, multi-site study of young adults at clinical high risk. Onset of psychosis typically occurs during the transition from adolescence to early adulthood, a period of time when the brain is also maturing, they note.
Veterans say experimental PTSD treatment has changed their lives Some of the latest tools to help vets recover from wounds both mental and physical include bionics, virtual reality and magnetic waves.
Your Computer Understands Your Personality Better Than Your Friends Do Whenever you use a computer, you leave behind a rich seam of personal information—and computers can use that to understand your personality far better than your family or friends....
Best of Our Blogs: January 13, 2015 Sometimes to fulfill a new dream, we need to let go of a dream we had. Maybe it’s saying goodbye to a relationship (business and personal) that doesn’t serve you so you’re wide open for one that does. Or it could be letting go of a vision you had for...
Starting a Counseling Practice Part 10: Blogging for We have other blogs where we talk about what not to do when blogging or how to write a blog, but the focus of this blog (how many times have I said blog already?) is going to be how to blog for your niche. Let’s just clarify why we love...
Teams Better Than Individuals at Intelligence Analysis, Research Finds Study results counter common work methods of U.S. intelligence community
#133 Getting Organized When last we met I was in the throes of family chaos—Christmas at Ground Zero. As I said we did recover to a certain extent. The event became a reference point that no one wanted to be repeated. I won’t say that we got instantly better but I had drawn...
Scientists discover possible new target for treating brain inflammation A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has identified an enzyme that produces a class of inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain. Abnormally high levels of these molecules appear to cause a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, and that disorder now may be treatable if researchers can develop suitable drug candidates that [...]The post Scientists discover possible new target for treating brain inflammation appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers find BPA and BPS affect embryonic brain development in zebrafish Bisphenol A, known as BPA, is produced in massive quantities around the world for use in consumer products, including household plastics. In response to public concerns, many manufacturers have replaced BPA with a chemical called bisphenol S (BPS), which is often labeled as “BPA-free” and presumed to be safer. In a study published Monday, Jan. [...]The post Researchers find BPA and BPS affect embryonic brain development in zebrafish appeared first on PsyPost.
Do viruses make us smarter? Endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells A new study from Lund University in Sweden indicates that inherited viruses that are millions of years old play an important role in building up the complex networks that characterise the human brain. Researchers have long been aware that endogenous retroviruses constitute around five per cent of our DNA. For many years, they were considered [...]The post Do viruses make us smarter? Endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells appeared first on PsyPost.
A virtual reality brain training game can detect mild cognitive impairment Greek researchers demonstrated the potential of a virtual supermarket cognitive training game as a screening tool for patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among a sample of older adults. MCI is a condition that often predates Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is characterized by memory loss and inability to execute complex activities such as financial planning. [...]The post A virtual reality brain training game can detect mild cognitive impairment appeared first on PsyPost.
Disruptive children benefit from tailored classroom intervention Young children with disruptive behaviors have fewer opportunities to learn in school than their focused peers, and are at risk for lower levels of academic achievement. These children often have high maintenance temperaments, characterized by high physical activity, low ability to persist at tasks, and negative reactions to even minor situations. A new study in [...]The post Disruptive children benefit from tailored classroom intervention appeared first on PsyPost.
Pediatricians miss autism symptoms in brief checkups As the rate of children with autism in the U.S. continues to grow, a new study published today in top-ranked journal Pediatrics shows that medical professionals can’t rely solely on their clinical judgment to detect autism risk. The study finds that 10-20-minute observations, such as a pediatric exam, don’t provide enough information about symptoms associated [...]The post Pediatricians miss autism symptoms in brief checkups appeared first on PsyPost.
Research shows promise for reducing risk of breast cancer spreading to brain New research seeks to better understand why and how breast cancer can spread to the brain with the goal of developing a way to reduce the risk of this phenomenon. "Unfortunately, the rate of secondary breast tumors in the brain is now threefold higher than it was 10 years ago," the lead researcher said. "Once a woman has a brain tumor coming from the breast, we have few effective therapies."
Relieve Pain, Stress, and Sleeplessness with Japanese Massage Techniques Getting a good night’s sleep can seem like an impossible dream for those in chronic pain. And to make matters worse, the situation tends to worsen over time, resulting in a never-ending pain/insomnia cycle. The pain causes sleep deprivation, which in turn weakens the body’s natural pain control mechanisms —...
Computers using digital footprints are better judge of personality than friends and family A new study, published today in the journal PNAS, compares the ability of computers and people to make accurate judgments about our personalities. People’s judgments were based on their familiarity with the judged individual, while computer models used a specific digital signal: Facebook Likes. The results show that by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was [...]The post Computers using digital footprints are better judge of personality than friends and family appeared first on PsyPost.
Charles Darwin's Daily Walks What Charles Darwin's daily walk did for his mind
A love beyond illusions Articles on people’s experience of the altered states of madness often fall into similar types: tragedy, revelation or redemption. Very few do what a wonderful article in Pacific Standard manage: give an account of how a young couple learn to live with psychosis. It’s an interesting piece because it’s not an account of how someone […]
Study finds experience of pain relies on multiple brain pathways, not just one People’s mindsets can affect their experience of pain. For example, a soldier in battle or an athlete in competition may report that an injury did not feel especially painful in the heat of the moment. But until now it has been unclear how this phenomenon works in the brain. A new study led by the [...]The post Study finds experience of pain relies on multiple brain pathways, not just one appeared first on PsyPost.