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New research on what the nose ‘knows’ reveals an unexpected simplicity What the nose knows is quite amazing, when you think about it. The moment you encounter an awful odor – spoiled milk, say, or the scent of skunk – you reflexively recoil in disgust. Often, too, you take action, quickly disposing of the bad milk or moving as fast as you can away from the [...]The post New research on what the nose ‘knows’ reveals an unexpected simplicity appeared first on PsyPost.
Sexual supply and demand: Men want commitment when women are scarce, study finds The sexual stereotype, in line with evolutionary theory, is that women want commitment and men want lots of flings. But a study of the Makushi people in Guyana shows the truth is more complex, with men more likely to seek long-term relationships when women are in short supply. “Commitment to a relationship is influenced by [...]The post Sexual supply and demand: Men want commitment when women are scarce, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Video shows how expansion microscopy brings the brain in 3-D into focus While most efforts to understand the brain focus on new technologies to magnify small anatomical features, engineers at the MIT-based Center for Brains, Minds and Machines have found a way to make brains physically bigger.The post Video shows how expansion microscopy brings the brain in 3-D into focus appeared first on PsyPost.
Are your emotions contagious? We're known to mimic each other's facial expressions and posture, but they aren’t the only things we can subconsciously 'catch' from others.The post Are your emotions contagious? appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists Have Provided Evidence for Optimism By Shocking Dogs Nearly every activity you fear can turn into something that brings you joy. Don't believe it? There's proof. And it involves that old scientific standby — applying electricity to animals....
Overwhelmed Or Depressed? Wisdom from Martin Luther King, Jr. Tis the season to feel a bit down, overwhelmed and stressed. When the mind is focusing on the negative details of life, it’s practicing seeing things through this lens and what we practice and repeat creates a habit of thoughts, feelings, emotions and sensations. I call this getting caught in...
Why Knowing Yourself Helps All Your Relationships Knowing yourself may be one of the hardest tasks you'll ever attempt....
Researchers discover ‘idiosyncratic’ brain patterns in autism Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been studied for many years, but there are still many more questions than answers. For example, some research into the brain functions of individuals with autism spectrum have found a lack of synchronization (‘connectivity’) between different parts of the brain that normally work in tandem. But other studies have found [...]The post Researchers discover ‘idiosyncratic’ brain patterns in autism appeared first on PsyPost.
A new neural circuit controls fear in the brain Some people have no fear, like that 17-year-old kid who drives like a maniac. But for the nearly 40 million adults who suffer from anxiety disorders, an overabundance of fear rules their lives. Debilitating anxiety prevents them from participating in life’s most mundane moments, from driving a car to riding in an elevator. Today, a [...]The post A new neural circuit controls fear in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Things That Keep Me Going What Keeps Me Going, Even Though I Live With Bipolar   There was a time I could not speak for myself, let alone anyone else. I was too depressed or too manic to even know where I was, who I was and I could barely lift a finger to help...
What We Have Here is a Failure to Communicate! I am constantly shocked and reminded just how easy it is to hurt or be hurt by our loved ones due to problems of communication. Communication is supposed to consist of both talking and listening in somewhat equal measure. But regrettably, sometimes there is one but not the other. Sound...
New Year; Same You Keeping up with New Year's Resolutions requires an active change in thinking and behavior. Apply these 7 skills to get one step closer to your annual goals.
New Year, Same You Keeping up with New Year's resolutions require an active change in thinking and behavior. Apply these seven skills to get one step closer to your annual goals.
Research Reveals Secret to Forming New Habits According to research, 40% of people’s daily routines are habitual. Built over a lifetime of repetition, these habits seem to occur almost on their own. Wiping your shoes on the mat; drinking coffee in the morning; having a cigarette while talking on the phone.  Little things, like which sock you...
Schismo….what? Anger is contagious and so is goodwill. Schismogenesis. It’s a term that you’re not likely to have heard very often, unless you’re studying esoteric words for a spelling bee that you’re planning to enter, or if you’re a graduate student or researcher in anthropology. It was coined in 1935 by...
The Power of Writing: 3 Types of Therapeutic Writing Some of us think that writing is only for writers. But writing is for all of us. As Julia Cameron notes in her book The Right to Write: An Invitation and Initiation into the Writing Life, “I believe we all come into life as writers.” Writing can be beneficial for...
#134 Mary Poppins We’re Not Madame LaZonga via Compfight Wouldn’t it be great if we all had a Mary Poppins-type person who lived with us? She would magically teach the children to behave and the household help to love each other (That is, assuming that we had household help.) She would encourage the father to...
My Body Image Dream for 2015 Today, in the U.S., we honor Martin Luther King, Jr., who had an incredible dream and helped make it a reality. Inspired by his powerful speech and Therese Borchard’s beautiful piece, every year I republish a piece on my personal dream (which I’ve updated since last year). It’s a dream...
The One Conversation Introvert-Extrovert Couples Should Have Introverts and extroverts may approach conflict differently, but knowing each other's style can pave the way to effective conflict management in relationships.
How the brain recognizes danger: New discovery Our existence depends on a bit of evolutionary genius aptly nicknamed “fight or flight.” But where in our brain does the alarm first go off, and what other parts of the brain are mobilized to express fear and remember to avoid danger in the future? New research sheds some light on this question.