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New cell marking technique to help understand how our brain works Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a new technique to mark individual brain cells to help improve our understanding of how the brain works. In neuroscience research, it is a challenge to individually label cells and to track them over space or time. Our brain has billions of cells and to be able [...]The post New cell marking technique to help understand how our brain works appeared first on PsyPost.
Crowdsourcing with mobile apps brings ‘big data’ to psychological research A fast-paced game app where players pretend they are baggage screening officers operating airport x-ray scanners has provided researchers with billions of pieces of data in record time, according to an article published by the American Psychological Association. “Mobile devices offer researchers an exciting new means to crowdsource an experiment using games that are actually [...]The post Crowdsourcing with mobile apps brings ‘big data’ to psychological research appeared first on PsyPost.
New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer’s disease early No methods currently exist for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, which affects one out of nine people over the age of 65. Now, an interdisciplinary team of Northwestern University scientists and engineers has developed a noninvasive MRI approach that can detect the disease in a living animal. And it can do so at the [...]The post New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer’s disease early appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links physical violence to stress hormone in women but not men A new study links physical violence against women by male partners to a disruption of a key steroid hormone that opens the door potentially to a variety of negative health effects. The study by the University of Oregon and the Oregon Social Learning Center looked at daily fluctuations of cortisol levels in men and women. [...]The post Study links physical violence to stress hormone in women but not men appeared first on PsyPost.
Older adults’ financial knowledge offsets their declining cognitive ability Getting old doesn’t spell doom when it comes to making important financial decisions, a team of researchers led by a University of California, Riverside assistant professor report in a just published paper. Using credit scores and cognitive ability tests, the researchers found evidence that “crystallized intelligence,” which is gained through experience and accumulated knowledge, is [...]The post Older adults’ financial knowledge offsets their declining cognitive ability appeared first on PsyPost.
Research on guilt-prone individuals has implications for workplace Some people hate to disappoint–and you should definitely get them on your team. It turns out individuals who are highly prone to feel guilty for disappointing their co-workers are among the most ethical and hard-working partners. However, new research suggests that these highly guilt-prone people may be the most reticent to enter into partnerships. Scott [...]The post Research on guilt-prone individuals has implications for workplace appeared first on PsyPost.
The Real Reason You Shouldn't Get Drunk And Write Political Comments We've all done it. We've gone to the wrong website in the wrong mood — or under the influence— and left angry scrawls in the comments. But we shouldn't, and not just because it makes us look stupid. This behavior actually strengthens the position of the people we're arguing against....
Choose to Change A farmer found an eagle’s nest and saw the mother shot dead beside it. In the nest the farmer found a single egg, which he so he took back to his farm and slipped it under one of the hens. The egg eventually hatched with the other eggs under the...
Alan Turing: Exceptional Intellect and Asperger’s British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing led a group of other brilliant codebreakers, including Joan Clarke, at Bletchley Park outside London during WWII to crack the German’s Enigma code. One of his biographers, professor S. Barry Cooper, writes that Turing “was a strange man, who never...
It’s OK to Say No to Opportunities We’re all faced with choices every single day of our lives. We’re also faced with numerous opportunities. These choices and opportunities come in questions from our friends, loved ones and colleagues. Some opportunities have incredible potential to take us places we never could have imagined. Some are just everyday opportunities,...
New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer's disease early A noninvasive MRI approach that can detect the Alzheimer's disease in a living animal, well before typical Alzheimer's symptoms appear, has been developed by researchers. The research team created an MRI probe that pairs a magnetic nanostructure with an antibody that seeks out the amyloid beta brain toxins responsible for onset of the disease. The accumulated toxins, because of the associated magnetic nanostructures, show up as dark areas in MRI scans of the brain.
Therapy For Jewish Children With Special Needs How to get therapy for special-needs children in Jewish schools....
Why We Control “Touched” People Instead of Asking “What’s A story from Appalachia: one gent used to get a little tooted up on likker, steal a dumpy old private plane and “bomb” his ex-wife’s place with five pound bags of flour. ...
5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be In the In crowd As our mothers used to say – being popular and in the in crowd isn’t everything. In fact, science says that being cool isn’t actually cool either.
Using light to understand the brain An innovative way to understand how the brain works by using flashes of light, has been developed by researchers, allowing them to both 'read' and 'write' brain signals.The new technique combines two cutting-edge technologies for reading and writing electrical activity in the brain.
Changing From Bad To “Good” I can remember from an early age going to my mom and then eventually my dad about some issues I was having. I was a paranoid child and would sit up, wide awake for days at a time waiting for whatever it was outside to come in and do horrible...
Staying Sane in a Season of Excess This time of year most people set out extra stuff: Christmas trees, menorahs, wrapped packages, special plates, snowmen, nutcrackers, you name it. Leaving the house means an assault of sounds and smells and sights: tinsel, evergreen, Rudolph the Red-nose Reindeer. More spending is more stress for many people, as are...
Existing drug, riluzole, may prevent foggy 'old age' brain, research shows Forgetfulness, it turns out, is all in the head. Scientists have shown that fading memory and clouding judgment, the type that comes with advancing age, show up as lost and altered connections between neurons in the brain. But new experiments suggest an existing drug, known as riluzole and already on the market as a treatment for ALS, may help prevent these changes.
The Upside of Discovering Your Incompetencies Whether you're a finance guru or a marketing mastermind, we all really have only one thing that we're exceptional at.
Stressful Family? 10 Mantras to Get You Through the Is your family happy and supportive? Are your holiday family gatherings warm, loving and festive? If so, that is wonderful. And you can stop reading this article now. Is your family complicated? Do you often feel hurt, pained, disappointed, damaged, or let down when your family is together? If so, this...