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Scientists locate homing signal in brain, explaining why some people are better navigators The part of the brain that tells us the direction to travel when we navigate has been identified by UCL scientists, and the strength of its signal predicts how well people can navigate. It has long been known that some people are better at navigating than others, but until now it has been unclear why. [...]The post Scientists locate homing signal in brain, explaining why some people are better navigators appeared first on PsyPost.
#130 Christmas at Ground Zero In honor of the season I wanted to go back to a story that has become the stuff of legend in our family. Christmas  has been a time of joy in our household but not without its, shall we say, traumatic moments.  Our three older boys were about eight, six...
Mini Manic Moments For the past month I have been on a new antidepressant called Prestiq to help with my anxiety. It seems to be a never-ending battle of keeping the fear at bay. Prestiq is in addition to the antidepressant, Prozac. The only real hard-to-handle side effect I experienced was sweating. Yes....
Are New Treatments for Depression Right Under Our Nose? “The air of ideas is the only air worth breathing.” – Edith Wharton Yogic breathing, a phone app, and laughing gas may be some of the best new remedies for depression. Some interesting pilot studies in 2014 are providing hope for the future of depression. Curiously, these new possibilities all involve...
What you tweet when you go party can be useful for improving urban planning Millions of Twitter users are constantly reporting where they are and what they are doing. With this information, two Spanish computer science experts suggest using geolocalized tweets for urban planning and land use. They have already done it in Manhattan, Madrid and London and have been able to identify, for example, nightlife areas of these [...]The post What you tweet when you go party can be useful for improving urban planning appeared first on PsyPost.
Thanking customers can reap rewards Companies rarely acknowledge customers who fill out those ubiquitous satisfaction surveys. But a sincere, well-timed “thank you” can reap huge rewards, finds first-of-its-kind research led by a Michigan State University marketing scholar. According to the study, which focused on an upscale sit-down restaurant, satisfied customers who received an acknowledgement of their comments from the company [...]The post Thanking customers can reap rewards appeared first on PsyPost.
Patient self-reporting version of ‘blood pressure cuff’ for dementia is reliable and valid The patient self-reporting version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor — a primary-care tool to measure cognitive, functional and psychological symptoms — is user-friendly, reliable and valid, including being sensitive to symptom change, according to a new Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research study. Similar to the way the blood pressure [...]The post Patient self-reporting version of ‘blood pressure cuff’ for dementia is reliable and valid appeared first on PsyPost.
The biological spoils of war: Study finds those who take part in violent conflict have more wives, children Violent conflict may, under certain conditions, offer a biological benefit to those who take part in it, a Harvard study has found. The study, authored by Luke Glowacki, a doctoral student working with Richard Wrangham, Ruth Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology and Curator of Primate Behavioral Biology in the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, [...]The post The biological spoils of war: Study finds those who take part in violent conflict have more wives, children appeared first on PsyPost.
Are You Tending Your Garden of Love? “Your family and your love must be cultivated like a garden. Time, effort, and imagination must be summoned constantly to keep any relationship flourishing and growing.”  -Jim Rohn The wish for a deep sense of human connection and commitment is universal. Ask people what is most important to them and...
Once-in-a-lifetime experiences are amazing while they happen, but they may make you depressed in the Once-in-a-lifetime experiences are amazing while they happen, but they may make you depressed in the long term. A new study shows that your incredible vacation may come at a personal cost — Discover's Carl Engelking has the story....
The Power of Ambiguity in Family Communication All languages have a high degree of ambiguity built into them. Any sentence has at least two possible meanings, particularly within the context of a particular relationship. In sensitive family discussions, hiding one's true motives through the use of ambiguous communication is a frequent occurence. Understanding this ambiguity can help uncover crucial family secrets.
Patient self-reporting version of 'blood pressure cuff' for dementia is reliable, valid Patient self-reporting version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor -- a primary-care tool to measure cognitive, functional and psychological symptoms -- is user-friendly, reliable and valid, including being sensitive to symptom change, according to a new study.
Guest Post: Building A Solid Foundation To Get Booked ‘Thanks to Dr. Deb Legge for offering your expertise through this guest post. It is an honor to have you as a colleague and work together with you to help therapists grow their private practices.’ -Kelly and Miranda The BIG Problem: How are you going to get all of the...
Hot Flashes: I’m Hot, You’re Not I don’t know about you, but for me there is really nothing more embarrassing than a hot flash. Okay, maybe there are a few things, but hot flashes are right there at the top of my list. I dress in layers. It’s not a fashion statement, it’s a necessity. If...
The Power of Being Self-Compassionate Think about a time that you were overly critical with yourself. You looked in the mirror and didn’t like what you saw. You told yourself you were too skinny or too fat or even too average. You picked apart the image looking back at you. Or you forgot something important,...
Do Opposites Really Attract? Opposites attract, and likes repel. When it comes to magnetism, this principle is axiomatic. But does it also hold true for romantic relationships? New research suggests that when it comes to matters of the heart, well, it's complicated.
The Four Greatest Psychological Discoveries of 2014 Every day of every year, scientists toil away in their efforts to understand the workings of the human mind. What makes us happy? How do our emotions work? What should we be doing differently in our lives to make ourselves healthier, happier and stronger? Each year, a few studies stand...
Do You Use Logic to Justify Your Feelings? Over and over again, studies show that people set out on a mission to seek out reasons to support their emotional reactions. And because you are usually successful in this mission, you end up with the illusion of objectivity. You really believe that your position is logicallly and objectively justified....
Circling the drain of depression Two down, one to go. We made it through Thanksgiving and Christmas. There’s just New Year’s left. I can see the finish line but I’m close to bonking. Yes, I am taking my medications. I am exercising and getting plenty of sleep. I am eating well – except for the...
Your Journey is Well Worth Your Effort Well here we are – once again, it is nearly time for a brand new year to launch! I always get so excited when a new year arrives. It feels like encountering a giant blank chalkboard, complete with the most marvelous array of colored chalk. The chalkboard is all mine...