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#131 The Christmas Mystery It was not until Aaron, the oldest and wisest of the brothers, spoke that any of us understood. “I think Mom is really mad,” he said with a swallow. It couldn’t be. Could it? As I reviewed the events of the day, everything finally made sense. Indeed it was the...
5 Signs Stress Is Destroying Your Love Life and Stressed out? You may be damaging your relationship more than you think. Here’s how to fix it. Stress is sensory overload. Love, at its best, is sensory openness. Our senses — touch, smell, taste, seeing, hearing, and intuition — are how we experience ourselves and others. Under stress, we lose...
How To Not Take Personal Attacks Personally — What   We’ve all been there. Someone decides to go on a moral mission against us, challenging our beliefs, actions, even character. They may pick out embarrassing details about our lives, our past, even our families. They may even make things up.   Yes, we’ve all been attacked personally. And while...
How are Complex Trauma and Borderline Personality Disorder Related? I’ll admit that when I hear that a client has borderline personality disorder (BPD), my first thought is, “Oh, this person is a trauma survivor of some sort.” And while not all people with poor emotion management, impulsive and destructive actions, intense fear of abandonment and an unstable self image...
Neuroscientist reveals that women crave cigarette more strongly during their periods The menstrual cycle appears to have an effect on nicotine cravings, according to a new study by Adrianna Mendrek of the University of Montreal and its affiliated Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal. “Our data reveal that incontrollable urges to smoke are stronger at the beginning of the follicular phase that begins after menstruation. [...]The post Neuroscientist reveals that women crave cigarette more strongly during their periods appeared first on PsyPost.
Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind Most people have seen fMRI scans of the human brain. These use a technology called functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify portions of the brain that are active while a subject is being scanned. Fuzzy, ill-defined areas that “light up” on the scans indicate where neurons are active, based on magnetic changes in the blood [...]The post Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind appeared first on PsyPost.
Men with mommy issues more likely to experience erectile dysfunction A recent study suggests that the true cause for a man’s erectile dysfunction may lie in his relationship (or lack thereof) with his mother. According to the study, males who have a strained relationship with their mothers during childhood may be more likely to experience sexual problems as an adult. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the [...]The post Men with mommy issues more likely to experience erectile dysfunction appeared first on PsyPost.
Listening to human speech has consequences for infants that go beyond learning words America’s preoccupation with the “word gap”– the idea that parents in impoverished homes speak less to their children, which, in turn, predicts outcomes like school achievement and income later in life — has skyrocketed in recent years, leading to a rise in educational initiatives aiming to narrow the achievement gap by teaching young children more [...]The post Listening to human speech has consequences for infants that go beyond learning words appeared first on PsyPost.
Feeling cold is contagious, and it’s no accident Have you ever sat in a public space and realized that you didn’t quite notice how cold it was until those around you began reaching for their sweaters? While it may be true that you were always cold and just didn’t acknowledge it until you saw others do so, a recent study from England suggests [...]The post Feeling cold is contagious, and it’s no accident appeared first on PsyPost.
Alcohol taxes protective against binge drinking, study shows Higher alcohol taxes strongly protect against binge drinking, according to a new study by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers. The study, published in the journal Addiction, found that a one-percent increase in alcohol beverage prices from taxes was associated with a 1.4 percent decrease in the proportion of adults who binge drink. [...]The post Alcohol taxes protective against binge drinking, study shows appeared first on PsyPost.
Humans and sparrows make sense of sounds in similar ways The song of the swamp sparrow — a grey-breasted bird found in wetlands throughout much of North America — is a simple melodious trill, repeated over and over again. “It’s kind of like a harmonious police whistle,” said biologist Stephen Nowicki. But according to a new study by Duke University scientists Nowicki and Robert Lachlan, [...]The post Humans and sparrows make sense of sounds in similar ways appeared first on PsyPost.
Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in children, teens A new study of twins suggests that insomnia in childhood and adolescence is partially explained by genetic factors. Results show that clinically significant insomnia was moderately heritable at all stages of the longitudinal study. Genetic factors contributed to 33 to 38 percent of the insomnia ratings at the first two stages of the study, when [...]The post Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in children, teens appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines criminal behavior in patients with neurodegenerative diseases Criminal behavior can occur in patients with some neurodegenerative diseases, although patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) were among the least likely to commit crimes, according to a study published online by JAMA Neurology. Neurodegenerative diseases can cause dysfunction of the neural structures involved with judgment, executive function, emotional processing, sexual behavior, violence and self-awareness. This [...]The post Study examines criminal behavior in patients with neurodegenerative diseases appeared first on PsyPost.
If You Trust Your Workplace, You Assume It is Fair Periodically, dissatisfied employees will stage a job action in which they will do the minimum amount of work necessary to keep their job. For example, in early 2015, New York City police minimized the number of arrests they made, to protest comments made by the mayor.
A 3 Step Process to Help You Stay Focused “Lack of direction, not lack of time, is the problem. We all have twenty-four hour days.” If you think back to a time when you were at your best I would bet you had some important goal you were working on. I know in my life when I have purposeful goals...
Imaging linking cell activity, behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind An automated method (much more sensitive than fMRI) to detect the activity of neurons during specific behaviors, at the resolution of individual brain cells throughout the entire mouse brain, has been successfully demonstrated. A team shows brain activation patterns when male mice perform two critical tasks: recognizing other individuals and determining the sex of another individual.
Day Five: Read the textbook and work the problems. My mom deserves the credit for this one. When I was a kid math was not my forte, and in eighth grade I was struggling and failing at algebra. So my mom went to the local bookstore and bought me a review book (picture the mid-1970’s version of Algebra for...
Animal study points to a treatment for Huntington's disease By adjusting the levels of a key signaling protein, researchers improved motor function and brain abnormalities in experimental animals with a form of Huntington's disease, a severe neurodegenerative disorder. The new findings may lay the groundwork for a novel treatment for people with this fatal, progressive disease, researchers say.
Found: The missing part of brain’s ‘internal compass’ If you have taken a walk and would like to return home you need to have an idea of where you are in relation to your destination. To do this, you need to know which way you are facing and also in which direction home lies. This all seems fairly instinctive to humans and other [...]The post Found: The missing part of brain’s ‘internal compass’ appeared first on PsyPost.
How technology is changing language and the way we think about the world We are getting used to the idea of rapidly developing technologies changing what we can do and how we do things. What most people haven’t considered is how technologies affect our language and how these changes are affecting the way we speak and even the way we think. One of the key ways we see [...]The post How technology is changing language and the way we think about the world appeared first on PsyPost.