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How To Spot A Bad Therapist: 10 Major Signs   Dr Viktor Frankl, Logotherapist and author of Man’s Search For Meaning, coined the term “iatrogenic neurosis” to describe an illness “caused” by or made worse by a provider of healthcare. It’s hard to imagine that a healthcare provider, specifically a mental health professional, can make an illness worse. How is...
The Thin Line Between Love and Hate It often seems a thin line between love and hate, and now scientists think they know why. Brain scans of people shown images of individuals they hated revealed a pattern of brain activity that partly occurs in areas also activated by romantic love. This linkage may account for why love and hate are so closely linked to each other in life.
10 Types of Creative Blocks And How To Fix  These creative blocks apply most directly to writers; novelists, screenwriters, tv writers, non-fiction and other writers.  However, they can apply to any creative projects; songs, musicals, art projects, graphic novels, acting showcases, pottery, architecture or painting projects. I do psychotherapy  and career coaching with all kinds of creative professionals.  Similar blocks exist for...
Safety concerns over lack of support for Prison Officers' mental health People working in prisons and in secure hospitals in the UK are at considerable risk of work-related stress, exhaustion and depression. This raises serious concerns for safety, researchers suggest.
Drug overdose epidemic to recede soon, study claims A study by researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health is the first to apply Farr’s Law on the rise and fall of epidemics to an outbreak that isn’t, strictly speaking, infectious in origin: drug overdoses. At present, more than 40,000 Americans die every year by unintentional drug overdose–a number that has ballooned [...]The post Drug overdose epidemic to recede soon, study claims appeared first on PsyPost.
New drug design enhances brain signaling by a factor of 1,000 Chemical-biological research from the University of Copenhagen sheds light on important communication processes in the brain by means of new effective molecules that improve the starting point provided by nature by more than 1,000 times. In the long term, this new knowledge may lead to psychopharmacological drugs with fewer side effects. The results have just [...]The post New drug design enhances brain signaling by a factor of 1,000 appeared first on PsyPost.
Despite resolutions, people buy more food after New Year Despite New Year’s resolutions to eat better and lose weight, people buy the greatest amount of food and calories after the holidays, finds a study led by a University of Vermont researcher. The study, published by PLOS ONE, finds consumer spending on food increases by 15 percent over the holiday season (Thanksgiving to New Year), [...]The post Despite resolutions, people buy more food after New Year appeared first on PsyPost.
Study quantifies the effect of depressive thoughts on memory For people with depressed mood, memory and concentration difficulties are often a day-to-day reality, greatly affecting job performance and personal relationships. While those with the disorder report that these cognitive problems are some of the most deeply troubling, previous studies have been unable to observe this phenomenon in a laboratory setting. In a study published [...]The post Study quantifies the effect of depressive thoughts on memory appeared first on PsyPost.
International research effort gives neuroscientists better feeling about sense of touch Our sense of touch is one we often take for granted, until our leg falls asleep and we aren’t able to stand, or when we experience acute pain. The sense of touch also has been taken for granted in neuroscience, where it’s the sense scientists know the least about. An international group of researchers, including [...]The post International research effort gives neuroscientists better feeling about sense of touch appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers map direct gut-brain connection After each one of those big meals you ate over the holidays, the cells lining your stomach and intestines released hormones into the bloodstream to signal the brain that you were full and should stop eating. Researchers at Duke University have now mapped out another system, a cell-to-cell connection between the gut and the nervous [...]The post Researchers map direct gut-brain connection appeared first on PsyPost.
Becoming a Minority Fuels Conservatism Psychologists are presently very interested in understanding factors that predict political ideology. A recent series of studies asks whether White Americans, when facing the future as a minority group, shift politically to the right.
How to Deal with Mental Illness Stigma I’ve seen the worst of it. I’ve been asked if I’ve ever killed anybody and I’ve seen the disgust on people’s faces when I disclose the simple fact that I have schizophrenia. Nine years in and this illness is so much a part of who I am. I imagine it’s...
Remapping the damaged brain A time-dependent interplay between two brain regions that contributes to the recovery of motor function after focal brain damage, such as a stroke, has been identified by scientists. The research shows that when motor functions are remapped through rehabilitative training, brain regions relatively distant from a lesion are recruited during the initial stages and functional connections with regions near the lesion are strengthened during the latter stages.
MRI scan sensitive to metabolic changes reveals brain differences in bipolar disorder Sometimes, a new way of looking at something can bring to light an entirely new perspective. Using a different type of MRI imaging, researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered previously unrecognized differences in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder. In particular, the study, published Jan. 6 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, revealed [...]The post MRI scan sensitive to metabolic changes reveals brain differences in bipolar disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Positive personality traits may protect police at high risk for PTSD Personal traits such as resilience, satisfaction with life and a grateful disposition may help shield police officers from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of a natural disaster. This is the case even though repeated exposure to traumatic events has been found to provoke PTSD and police officers are exposed repeatedly to [...]The post Positive personality traits may protect police at high risk for PTSD appeared first on PsyPost.
An unexpected way to recover from a breakup Breaking up is truly hard to do. And recovery from a breakup can be even harder. Your friends may consul you to put the whole thing out of your mind. But new research suggests that repeatedly reflecting on a break-up – even through participation in a research study – actually speeds emotional recovery. “Breakups are [...]The post An unexpected way to recover from a breakup appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Men who post a lot of selfies score higher on measures of narcissism and psychopathy The picture isn’t pretty for guys who post a lot of selfies on social media sites like Facebook and Instagram. A new study showed that men who posted more online photos of themselves than others scored higher on measures of narcissism and psychopathy. In addition, men who were more likely to edit their selfies before [...]The post Study: Men who post a lot of selfies score higher on measures of narcissism and psychopathy appeared first on PsyPost.
Men who post a lot of selfies score higher on measures of narcissism and psychopathy The picture isn’t pretty for guys who post a lot of selfies on social media sites like Facebook and Instagram. A new study showed that men who posted more online photos of themselves than others scored higher on measures of narcissism and psychopathy. In addition, men who were more likely to edit their selfies before [...]The post Men who post a lot of selfies score higher on measures of narcissism and psychopathy appeared first on PsyPost.
What motivates males who commit sexual assault on campus? The shocking statistic that about one in five women will be the victim of sexual assault while in college is made even more so by the fact that most of those women will know their assailants. No one-size-fits-all approach to rape prevention will be effective, as some offenders are driven by hostility toward women, while [...]The post What motivates males who commit sexual assault on campus? appeared first on PsyPost.
Study pinpoints autism-linked protein for sculpting brain connections Shortly after birth, human brains expand rapidly with the experience of an entirely new world. During this period, neurons in the newborn brain compete with one another to form lasting connections, called synapses. A new study by Duke researchers provides a close-up of synapse refinement and identifies a protein that is crucial in this process. [...]The post Study pinpoints autism-linked protein for sculpting brain connections appeared first on PsyPost.