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Up in smoke or bottoms up: How policy could affect substance abuse Half of young drivers who died in car crashes in American states such as California, Hawaii and West Virginia were under the influence of either alcohol or marijuana, or both. This is the story told by the statistics recording fatal road accidents involving 16- to 25-year olds in nine US states. It was used by [...]The post Up in smoke or bottoms up: How policy could affect substance abuse appeared first on PsyPost.
Decoded: How the brain, spinal cord make us walk Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Researchers from the Medical University of Vienna have identified the mechanisms used by the spinal cord to trigger activity in leg muscles, marking the first time that the spinal cord activation patterns responsible for walking have been successfully decoded. Previous research has demonstrated that this activity can [...]The post Decoded: How the brain, spinal cord make us walk appeared first on PsyPost.
People watching: Different brain pathways responsible for person, movement recognition The ability to understand different movements, such as walking, skipping and jumping, engages different brain mechanisms from those that recognize who is initiating the action. A new study illustrates for the first time how individuals with prosopagnosia, or face blindness, are still able to recognize other people's movements.
Computers Judge Personality Better Than People Do New research shows that a simple algorithm adding up your Facebook Likes can actually assess your soul better than your soulmate can.
The Wisdom to Know the Difference (Day Twelve: Twelve God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference. -The Serenity Prayer I like Victorian-era cemeteries, and whenever I visit one the Serenity Prayer enters my mind. In those days there was...
Experience of pain relies on multiple brain pathways, not just one People's mindsets can affect their experience of pain. For example, a soldier in battle or an athlete in competition may report that an injury did not feel especially painful in the heat of the moment. But until now it has been unclear how this phenomenon works in the brain.
First evidence of neuroinflammation in brains of chronic pain patients A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found, for the first time, evidence of neuroinflammation in key regions of the brains of patients with chronic pain. By showing that levels of an inflammation-linked protein are elevated in regions known to be involved in pain transmission, the study paves the way for the exploration of potential new treatment strategies and possibly for biomarkers reflecting pain conditions.
New research on what the nose 'knows' reveals an unexpected simplicity Two types of neuronal processors found in the rat olfactory bulb solve the difficult problem of identifying constantly fluctuating environmental odors through linear summation. A team working for 5 years across two continents have made thist surprising discovery, explaining that it's an operation no less straightforward than the one a child uses to add or multiply numbers.
Possible new target for treating brain inflammation found An enzyme that produces a class of inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain has been identified by researchers. Abnormally high levels of these molecules appear to cause a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, they report.
“We Die, and We Don’t Die” Shunryu Suzuki said: “We die, and we don’t die.” Yes: right now you are both coming and going, living and dying. Put differently: right now you are dying and not-dying. It is like that now… and, per my conviction, at any point of time, whether it is right now or...
A State of Psychiatric Emergency Psychiatry is fast approaching a death spiral which we as a society may not be able to recover from. In many residencies, psychotherapy is not even being taught. Many psychotherapists of all professions have been intimidated by specious neuro-biochemical theories, while others have simply given up. And now, there aren’t many remaining good therapists in practice anymore.
How to Rebalance an Out-of-balanced Life Looking at the titles of the lead articles that are currently featured prominently on the front cover of a lot of popular magazines, it’s hard not to notice the proliferation of pieces that have to do with the importance of living a balanced life. These articles usually warn the reader...
Beyond Eating, Beyond Money Dostoyevsky once described money as “coined liberty” (1915, 16). Indeed, money is independence. But what is money? All money is reducible to one and the same currency: energy. That’s what flows through us, what moves us, and what motivates us. Money energizes because money is energy. The American greenback is a...
Do You Dare to Pop This Question? Be careful what you ask, you may get an answer. After an evening of sharing the living room sofa together while they watched a romantic movie, Brandon turned to his partner Kim, to whom he’d been married for nearly thirty years and asked, “If you met me today, would you...
Working Out of a Creative Slump, Literally More often than not the advice I’m given when I hit a creative slump is to do more creative things. Make a collage. Write in my journal. Draw or doodle. Read a book or watch a movie. Find a new way to reorganize or rearrange my workspace. But when I’m...
How To Make SAMSHA’s “Health Homes” Work for the Done right, health homes could provide a needed “home base” for people with chronic health conditions or impairing mental health conditions to coordinate care. ...
Curcumin's ability to fight Alzheimer's studied One of the most promising new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease may already be in your kitchen. Curcumin, a natural product found in the spice turmeric, has been used by many Asian cultures for centuries, and a new study indicates a close chemical analog of curcumin has properties that may make it useful as a treatment for the brain disease.
The Therapist That Didn’t Show Up For His Sessions What if your therapist was missing in action?...
What it Means to be Divergent When I looked up the definition of “divergent,” I found these interpretations: a) having no finite limits (a mathematical expression). b) tending to be different or develop in different directions. c) farther apart at their tops than at their bases (of plant organs). I was doing this, of course, because over...
A Strange Depression Symptom That Most People Don’t Know This tip may help people who are feeling depressed. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:5 Classic Signs of Depression Most People Don’t Recognise Depression: 10 Fascinating Insights into a Misunderstood Condition Depression Alleviated By Feeling Connected to a Group The 5 Biggest Reasons People Get Anxious or Depressed The Curious Effect of Depression on Intuitive Thinking Skills