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Good things come to those who wait? Study finds that more serotonin, more patience In a study published January 15, 2015, in the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists, led by Zachary Mainen at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU), found a causal link between the activation of serotonin neurons and the amount of time mice are willing to wait, and rejected a possible link between increased [...]The post Good things come to those who wait? Study finds that more serotonin, more patience appeared first on PsyPost.
Study supports new explanation of gender gaps in academia It isn’t that women don’t want to work long hours or can’t compete in highly selective fields, and it isn’t that they are less analytical than men, researchers report in a study of gender gaps in academia. It appears instead that women are underrepresented in academic fields whose practitioners put a lot of emphasis on [...]The post Study supports new explanation of gender gaps in academia appeared first on PsyPost.
Alzheimer’s plaques reduced by targeting sugar attachment to the BACE1 enzyme Researchers at the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center in Japan have demonstrated that hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease can be reduced when sugars are prevented from binding to one of the key enzymes implicated in the disease. The new findings, reported in EMBO Molecular Medicine, show that abnormal attachment of a particular sugar to the [...]The post Alzheimer’s plaques reduced by targeting sugar attachment to the BACE1 enzyme appeared first on PsyPost.
Stress from the presence of strangers prevents empathy, in both mice and humans The ability to express empathy — the capacity to share and feel another’s emotions — is limited by the stress of being around strangers, according to a new study published today in the journal Current Biology. “President Barack Obama has described an ‘empathy deficit’ that fuels misunderstanding, divisions, and conflict. This research identifies a reason [...]The post Stress from the presence of strangers prevents empathy, in both mice and humans appeared first on PsyPost.
Difficult behavior in young children may point to later problems It’s normal for a young child to have tantrums and be otherwise disruptive, but researchers have found that if such behavior is prolonged or especially intense, the child may have conduct disorder, a childhood psychiatric problem that could be a harbinger of antisocial behavior. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found [...]The post Difficult behavior in young children may point to later problems appeared first on PsyPost.
Could our brain instruct our bodies to burn more fat? By uncovering the action of two naturally occurring hormones, scientists may have discovered a way to assist in the shedding of excess fat. The findings, published today in the journal Cell, give new insights into how the brain regulates body fat and may lead to more effective ways to lose weight and prevent obesity by [...]The post Could our brain instruct our bodies to burn more fat? appeared first on PsyPost.
What Makes a Good Pun? Punsters often insert puns into serious situations, thereby disrupting the hearer's goals. This produces groans of anger and frustration even if the puns are clever. The best puns are both clever and also succeed in furthering rather than disrupting the hearer's goals and in enhancing meaning.
Perfectionism? Can you avoid making mistakes or can you avoid your inner critic?
Everyday Bipolar Disorder and Order We're all a little bipolar, motivated in opposite directions. Healthier, more trustworthy people own their ambivalences. Here are some tips on how to do it.
The Lessons You’ve Learned Throughout the Years On the last pages of her book Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life From Dear Sugar Cheryl Strayed pens her response to the question: “What would you tell your twentysomething self if you could talk to her now?” These are snippets of her wisdom: “Feed yourself. Literally. The...
Control Your Time Not having control over your time is problematic. It can cause you to feel overloaded, pressured and tense. Time management is the act of planning and exercising control over time spent on activities. It is important to have enough time to complete tasks and also time for yourself to re-charge....
Video explains why workaholics are the least productive Are you addicted to work? It can't be bad to enjoy working hard, can it?The post Video explains why workaholics are the least productive appeared first on PsyPost.
What causes brain problems after traumatic brain injury? Studies have a surprising answer A new paper by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) argues that there is a widespread misunderstanding about the true nature of traumatic brain injury and how it causes chronic degenerative problems. In a perspective article published in the latest issue of Neurotherapeutics, the two authors – Alan Faden, MD, [...]The post What causes brain problems after traumatic brain injury? Studies have a surprising answer appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds that opioids administered in the ER don’t influence patient satisfaction A new study co-authored by investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School found that there is no correlation between opioids administered in the emergency room setting and Press Ganey ED patient satisfaction scores, one of the most commonly used metrics for measuring patient satisfaction. Based on these findings, the study’s authors suggest that emergency [...]The post Study finds that opioids administered in the ER don’t influence patient satisfaction appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers discover how midbrain map continuously updates visuospatial memory On the upcoming Super Bowl Sunday, a lot of us will be playing arm-chair quarterback. After the snap, we might use our eyes to track a wide receiver as he runs toward an opening, all the while remembering the location of the star running back in case he breaks through on a rushing play. This [...]The post Researchers discover how midbrain map continuously updates visuospatial memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Facebook sharing can boost involvement with news and information People who share news on social media sites may connect more with that information — and stay connected longer — than people who casually read the news, according to a team of researchers. “There seems to be growing concern that young people may be becoming more disengaged, particularly from mainstream media sources, and be more [...]The post Facebook sharing can boost involvement with news and information appeared first on PsyPost.
MIT team enlarges brain samples, making them easier to image Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of so-called “super-resolution” microscopes can see inside cells with resolution better than 250 nanometers. A team of researchers from MIT has now taken a novel approach [...]The post MIT team enlarges brain samples, making them easier to image appeared first on PsyPost.
Women who experience postpartum depression before giving birth may face greater risk When it comes to postpartum depression, one size does not fit all, according to a new study led by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers. Instead, women with postpartum depression may experience any of three distinct subtypes of clinical presentation, and each of these has important implications for their prognosis and the tailoring [...]The post Women who experience postpartum depression before giving birth may face greater risk appeared first on PsyPost.
Study reveals lack of data on opioid drugs for chronic pain A National Institutes of Health white paper that was released today finds little to no evidence for the effectiveness of opioid drugs in the treatment of long-term chronic pain, despite the explosive recent growth in the use of the drugs. The paper, which constitutes the final report of a seven-member panel convened by the NIH [...]The post Study reveals lack of data on opioid drugs for chronic pain appeared first on PsyPost.
People can be convinced they committed a crime that never happened Evidence from some wrongful-conviction cases suggests that suspects can be questioned in ways that lead them to falsely believe in and confess to committing crimes they didn’t actually commit. New research provides lab-based evidence for this phenomenon, showing that innocent adult participants can be convinced, over the course of a few hours, that they had [...]The post People can be convinced they committed a crime that never happened appeared first on PsyPost.