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U.S. culture began shifting towards individualism more than a century ago Baby Boomers have been referred to as the Me Generation, but new research indicates that people actually started to become increasingly self-centred more than 100 years ago. In the first study of its kind covering a 150-year period, researchers looked at U.S. culture to determine how and why people there became more independent and less [...]The post U.S. culture began shifting towards individualism more than a century ago appeared first on PsyPost.
Spontaneous activity shapes neuron development A process previously thought to be mere background noise in the brain has been found to shape the growth of neurons as the brain develops, according to research from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (MRC CDN), Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), published in Cell Reports. This work has important implications for our [...]The post Spontaneous activity shapes neuron development appeared first on PsyPost.
Lying Awake at Night Last night was one of those nights again. I woke up in the wee hours of the morning – maybe it was 3am, maybe it was 5am, I don’t know. I felt sad and uncomfortable. Something wasn’t right. What was it this time? Sometimes I wake up at night and...
Brian Williams told a tale – but it could be how he really remembers what happened Many of us have asked ourselves in the past few days: can you really falsely remember something as significant as being in a helicopter that was shot down? And many of us probably think “No way,” and quickly conclude that NBC news anchor Brian Williams invented this story to embellish his public image as a [...]The post Brian Williams told a tale – but it could be how he really remembers what happened appeared first on PsyPost.
Cross-cultural study finds individualists are more stressed out by social exclusion New research has discovered that social exclusion tends to cause more stress for people from individualistic cultures. The study, published in the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, found that individualists were more negatively affected by social exclusion than collectivists — not just psychologically, but also physically. Overall, collectivists displayed less physiological stress and higher levels of psychological well-being. “The importance of being included [...]The post Cross-cultural study finds individualists are more stressed out by social exclusion appeared first on PsyPost.
Looking for romance? You’ve been told opposites attract. This video explains why that’s a lie The scientific reasons you're into your bae.The post Looking for romance? You’ve been told opposites attract. This video explains why that’s a lie appeared first on PsyPost.
New fluorescent protein permanently marks neurons that fire A new tool developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Research Campus lets scientists shine a light on an animal’s brain to permanently mark neurons that are active at a particular time. The tool — a fluorescent protein called CaMPARI — converts from green to red when calcium floods a nerve cell after the [...]The post New fluorescent protein permanently marks neurons that fire appeared first on PsyPost.
The neural basis of ‘being in the mood’ What determines receptivity or rejection towards potential sexual partners? For people, there are many factors that play a part, appearance, culture, age, are all taken into account. But what part does the internal state of the individual play? The functioning of our bodies is maintained through a complicated system of hormonal signals. Some of these [...]The post The neural basis of ‘being in the mood’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents experience post-traumatic stress disorder after child’s stroke Parents of children who have suffered a stroke can experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the children show signs of clinical anxiety, factors that could interfere with treatment and outcomes, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2015. A preliminary study conducted at Boston Children’s Hospital examined 10 fathers, 23 [...]The post Parents experience post-traumatic stress disorder after child’s stroke appeared first on PsyPost.
Nationwide survey reveals widespread use of mind and body practices More Americans of all ages are rolling out their yoga mats in an effort to improve their health. A large nationally representative survey shows that the number of Americans using mind and body approaches to improve health and well-being remains high. Of note is a significant increase in the use of yoga since 2002. In [...]The post Nationwide survey reveals widespread use of mind and body practices appeared first on PsyPost.
The Struggle of Making a Living with Schizophrenia It’s an all too common fact that a good majority of homeless people have some kind of mental illness. Whether it’s diagnosed or not there’s a good chance that the reason they’re on the street is because they can’t hack living in today’s society. The economy is hard for everyone...
When You and Your Partner Fight It’s an inescapable truth that you and your partner will argue or fight. Often in therapy, I see that couples are unable to resolve a conflict, especially if it is regarding what renowned couples therapists Drs. John and Julie Gottman call “gridlock issues.” When this happens, couples often argue, then...
When Love Hurts This is a story of two little birds, both cockatiels. It’s about a kind of love that is destructive. It’s about when love hurts. It’s also about healing, growing, and changing. Once there were  two cockatiels who came to a rescue from a hoarding situation. One was named Mama Bird, and one...
The Game of Martyrdom and Its Effects The truth hurts, but lies destroy. Playing games is a way of lying to yourself and others while also avoiding the truth. This has an immediate positive effect on your life, and there are also a number of other benefits.  But eventually, like all games, it creates more conflict. Take...
Love and Wealth are Not Enough What’s the most important ingredient for a happy life? Philosophers, clergy, psychologists and researchers of all kinds have offered opinions on this question over the last five decades. Some say wealth, some say religion. Still others say family is the most important thing. But one factor emerges over and over...
Half a century of neuroscience The Lancet has a good retrospective looking back on the last 50 years of neuroscience, which in some ways, was when the field was born. Of course, the brain and nervous system has been the subject of study for hundreds, if not thousands, of years but the concept of a dedicated ‘neuroscience’ is relatively new. […]
HealthiestBlog.com: Introducing a New Website From PsyBlog’s Author PsyBlog's author introduces his new health website: HealthiestBlog.com. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Advertisement6 Foods That Fight Belly Fat Brought On By Yo-Yo Dieting. Related articles:These Everyday Foods Have a Powerful Connection With Mental Wellbeing 5 Habits Proven to Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s and Dementia The Effect Being Called ‘Fat’ Has on 10-Year-Old Girls, 9 Years Later Mental Health Problems Can Shorten Life More Than Heavy Smoking Family Problems In Childhood Affect Brain Development
Check Your Marital Privilege This article is co-authored – in alphabetical order – by Lisa Arnold, Rachel Buddeberg, Christina Campbell, and Bella DePaulo. We are cross-posting it on all of our blogs. “White privilege” and “male privilege” are familiar concepts in our cultural conversations. There is, however, another vast swath of unearned...
10 Ways to Tell How Realistic You are about Love We all hold beliefs about love and the importance it have for our happiness. This 10-item scale will tell you how realistic or unrealistic you are about what to expect from your closest romantic partners, how responsible you are for other people's happiness, and whether you're driven by the need for approval.
Psychology Around the Net: February 14, 2015 Happy Valentine’s Day, Psych Central readers! For those of you who observe Valentine’s Day, we have some interesting information about why single people actually might benefit more than those in relationships. Oh, and there’re are a few more fascinating reads — from taking a peek at some useful mental health...