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Can Daily Hugs Help Prevent Common Colds? Life can be stressful. Whether its dealing with tension at work or at home, many of us often feel under the gun. As it happens, when we are stressed out by those around us, we are more likely to get sick when exposed to a cold. So, what can be done to buffer ourselves from illness in times of stress? On answer might surprise you: daily hugs.
How To Interview A Therapist Before You Commit Choosing the right therapist for you is an important factor in the success of your therapy....
4 Ways To Keep Your Cool, No Matter What With these four simple steps we can become emotionally resilient, gracefully and calmly handling every situation that comes our way.
Brain's iconic seat of speech goes silent when we actually talk The brain's speech area, named after 19th century French physician Pierre Paul Broca, shuts down when we talk out loud, according to a new study that challenges the long-held assumption that 'Broca's area' governs all aspects of speech production.
Nicotine metabolite amplifies action of the primary chemical messenger for learning, memory Nicotine's primary metabolite supports learning and memory by amplifying the action of a primary chemical messenger involved in both, researchers report. Nicotine has long been known to aid learning and memory, but it's also highly addictive with a host of side effects from nausea and vomiting to increasing blood pressure and heart rate. The side effects reflect nicotinic receptors' presence in other areas of the brain and body and explain why its therapeutic use has essentially been limited to helping smokers quit, one researcher said.
You Can’t Save Your Child from Their Anorexia This guest post by my mother Sue Blackmore reflects on the difficulty, for parents with an anorexic child, of striking the right balance between caring for their child and ruining their own lives trying and failing to help.
The Science of Anti-Depressant Medication Is Based On Totally Backward Facts For 50 years scientists and the public alike have been completely wrong about the biological basis of depression. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Advertisement6 Foods That Fight Belly Fat Brought On By Yo-Yo Dieting. Related articles:Long-Held Belief About Depression Challenged by New Study A Blood Test for Depression Brain Scans Reveal Why Up To One in Six People Get SAD in Winter Autism: Vital Link Found Between Vitamin D and Serotonin Production Revealed: Long-Suspected Danger of Anti-Anxiety and Sleeping Drugs
The Science of Antidepressants Is Based On Totally Backward Facts For 50 years scientists and the public alike have been completely wrong about the biological basis of depression. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is"Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Advertisement6 Foods That Fight Belly Fat Brought On By Yo-Yo Dieting. Related articles:Long-Held Belief About Depression Challenged by New Study A Blood Test for Depression Brain Scans Reveal Why Up To One in Six People Get SAD in Winter Antidepressants: Higher Rates of Psychological Side-Effects Revealed by New Study Autism: Vital Link Found Between Vitamin D and Serotonin Production
Is the flame retardant, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a reproductive or developmental toxicant? Two studies examined the effects of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) at oral doses of 10,100 or 1000 mg/kg bw/day over the course of 2 generations on growth as well as behavioral, neurological and neuropathologic functions in offspring.
10 Barriers To Intimacy and How You Can Break Them Down How close and connected you feel to your partner changes over time and can, alas, both ebb and flow. What you can do to increase intimacy in your relationship, based on science.
How a Man Named Chesley Can Help Your Child One of the most powerful techniques to manage child anxiety is something I learned from a man named Chesley. Chesley loved planes. The first time he ever saw a plane speeding down the runway and rising off the ground, he was awestruck. Chelsey was five years old and he knew right then and...
Simplify to De-Stress Somewhere I read that a person spends the first half of their life accumulating stuff and the second half disbursing that same stuff. For me, that’s been true. Caught up in the corporate media to “get, get, get” has been replaced with the middle-age mantra of “simplify, simplify, simplify.” When...
New growth factor indicates possible regenerative effects in Parkinson's disease Researchers have long sought treatments that can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. Current treatments have for decades been only symptomatic in nature, supplying the neurotransmitter dopamine, which the dying nerve cells can no longer produce. Results from a recent clinical study offer hope that future therapies could take advantage of the brain's own protective mechanisms to limit neuronal cell death and restore dopamine production to natural levels. In the first time in humans, researchers have applied a growth factor to the brain with the hope of preserving dopaminergic cells and fibers.
Mulling the marijuana munchies: How the brain flips the hunger switch The 'munchies,' or that uncontrollable urge to eat after using marijuana, appear to be driven by neurons in the brain that are normally involved in suppressing appetite, according to a new study.
ADHD For Valentine’s Day Just in time for Valentines day, I wrote this post to help you out. Actually, I’m well aware that it’s late. I wanted to do something like this, but I have been busy. No, really, I have been busy. And not just ADHD busy. You know ADHD busy, right? That...
Depression: A Forever-Kind of Illness I overheard my husband describing my health to someone on the phone the other day. “She’s definitely better,” he said. “She’s trying a lot of new things. It’s hard to say what’s helping the most.” “Well, she’ll always have it. I mean, it will never go away completely. But she’s...
Triangulation: The Trap Of The Problematic Person Have you ever heard of the term “triangulate” or “triangulation?” If not, that’s okay because it’s typically a concept used in and mainly used in trauma-informed therapy. The term is typically used to describe an individual who creates drama, trouble, and confusion using 3 or more people in a situation....
Basic Personality Changes Linked to Unemployment, Study Finds Changes may add to challenge of finding new jobs
The Outside World Determines Your Thoughts   While it may feel as though your conscious thoughts are insulated from your surroundings, a recent study conducted by researchers at San Francisco State University has found otherwise. The study asked that participants look at an image, without thinking of the word associated with the image, or how many...
The science of teaching: Study finds brain processes that hold the key to understanding students How does the brain of a teacher work? New research has identified the parts of the brain involved in computing mistakes in other people's understanding, which is a key process in guiding students' learning.