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Your Therapist’s Other Life If you: have any friends or family who are therapists read therapist blogs watch television about therapists have located your therapist on social media … you probably can’t help but notice that therapists don’t always act the way they do in session. Basically in session, I am consistently able to...
Where Does the Anger in Your Relationship Come from? Everyday love can come with some anger... but is your anger linked to who you are, rather than what your partner did?
Stuttering: New insight on treatment, physiological basis New insight into the treatment of stuttering as well as understanding its physiological basis has been provided by two recent studies, providing information on both the treatment of stuttering as well as understanding its physiological basis.
Introducing Practical Psychoanalysis The world of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic theory is one steeped in the very history of psychiatry, with some of the most recognizable names practicing it. But modern psychoanalysis is different than psychoanalysis from a century ago. The process and techniques have been updated, so it’s not at all what is...
Want To Be Mentally Tough? Three Things You Should     Some call it grit. Others call it a fighting spirit. Others liken it to the ability to bounce back. Yet, whatever you call mental toughness, overcoming setbacks probably deserves a place in the definition.   So here are three things you should know about overcoming setbacks:   It’s...
How to Save Your Career From Social Media Meltdown Sharing the wrong thing on social media can cost you your job.
The Psychological Antidote – Part II In a previous post, the process of dehumanization was suggested as the psychological foundation leading to the atrocities conducted by organizations like ISIS. The opposite process of humanization was then suggested as the antidote for the development of extreme, violent behavior. This idea can be summarized as follows: When violent,...
How Technology is Tricking You Into Tipping More Digital payment systems use subtle tactics to increase tips, and while it’s certainly good for hard-working service workers, it may not be so good for your wallet. Here's the hidden psychology of why you unconsciously pay more.
How to Talk to Yourself When the going gets rough, I often speak to myself silently or softly in a soothing and compassionate voice. If I feel let down by a friend, I might repeat silently, “I feel hurt by her behavior but I mustn’t blame myself.” When I don’t deny that I feel bad, and even acknowledge it in a self-compassionate way, I’m better able to cope with disappointment and sorrow.
When to Seek Couples Counseling? 1.How do you combat the stigma of couples counseling? I always find it helpful to educate couple that pursuing counseling is not a sign of weakness or failure. The stigma of therapy has diminished across generations, but seeking counseling is still mentioned in whispers. All humans struggle with their feelings...
Addicted to Busy: 4 Strategies to Ease the Guilt & Burnout Keeping busy at all costs is the cultural status quo, but the drive to do more is impacting our families, our work, and our health. The result of being Addicted to Busy is not only a lack of time, but also exhaustion, anxiety, guilt, fear, social comparison, inauthenticity and physical illness.
How you cope with stress before it happens may affect recovery, study suggests Some strategies, like daydreaming about the problem fixing itself, might make you feel worse.
When kids think parents play favorites, it can spell trouble Most parents have a favorite child, psychologists say, even if they try to be fair.
How brain waves guide memory formation Two brain regions that are key to learning -- the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex -- use two different brain-wave frequencies to communicate as the brain learns to associate unrelated objects, researchers have discovered.
Brain activity shows infants are hardwired to link images, sounds as they learn to speak We are biologically predisposed to link images and sounds to create language, new research examining electrical brain activity in infants suggests. These findings reveal that sound symbolism allows 11-month-old infants to spontaneously bind the speech sound and the visual referent, and this spontaneous binding may provide infants an insight that spoken words refers to objects you can see in the world, an author explains.
Study shows how the brain can trigger a deep sleep Switching on one area of the brain chemically can trigger a deep sleep, scientists have found. The new study, which explored how sedatives work in the brain's neural pathways, could lead to better remedies for insomnia and more effective anesthetic drugs.
A Pattern Break # 74-1a I’d ask you out for lunch but, dear reader, we have a virtual relationship only.  So, instead, here’s an invitation to a pattern break for you (or, as the cliche goes, some food for thought): “You must find your basic question. My basic question was: ‘Is there anything behind the abstractions...
This Rat Experiment Will Haunt You, But Not For The Reason You Think This experiment, done on lab rats, isn't terribly cruel. It will still probably keep you up at night when you're thinking about hiring an exterminator....
A Mindful Minute: How to Observe a Train of Kids have anxious thoughts all the time . . . “I’m going to fail math and never get into college.” “I’m totally screwing up this speech right now, and everyone knows it.” “What if I don’t get asked to the dance? I’ll be humiliated for life.” Research shows us that...
An Awkward Proposal Last week’s cartoon was about the Rolling Stones song, You Can’t Always Get What You Want. Friends used to sing it to me in college, so I sing it to you now. All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2015.  My Donna Barstow site is here. And...