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Compound found in grapes, red wine may help prevent memory loss A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research.
Why I Can’t, and Don’t Build Things I think it is super sexy when a guy can fix things, and build things. The new generation is not as handy as the baby boomers are, and I’m sure more single women are learning how to manage things around their house which is great. I can screw in a...
Rumination’s Kryptonite: Singing a Tune Have you ever found yourself stuck on a thought? You may be replaying an argument you had with your spouse — or even imagining an argument you might have with them. You may be thinking about that time you said something wrong and made a fool out of yourself at...
Time-based training can decrease impulsivity, research finds A study conducted by researchers at Kansas State University is the first to demonstrate increases in both self-control and timing precision as a result of a time-based intervention. This new research may be an important clue for developing behavioral approaches to treat disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance abuse and obesity. The study, “Mechanisms [...]The post Time-based training can decrease impulsivity, research finds appeared first on PsyPost.
The brain’s social network: Nerve cells interact like friends on Facebook Neurons in the brain are wired like a social network, report researchers from Biozentrum, University of Basel. Each nerve cell has links with many others, but the strongest bonds form between the few cells most similar to each other. The results are published in the journal Nature. Nerve cells form a bewildering meshwork of connections [...]The post The brain’s social network: Nerve cells interact like friends on Facebook appeared first on PsyPost.
Listening carefully: Brain waves indicate listening challenges in older adults The elderly often complain about hearing difficulties, especially when several people are talking all at once. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have discovered that the reason for this does not just concern the ear but also changes in the attention processes in the brain of older people. [...]The post Listening carefully: Brain waves indicate listening challenges in older adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Anti-epilepsy drug preserves brain function after stroke New research suggests that an already-approved drug could dramatically reduce the debilitating impact of strokes, which affect nearly a million Americans every year. In the study, one dose of the anti-epilepsy drug, retigabine, preserved brain tissue in a mouse model of stroke and prevented the loss of balance control and motor coordination. Researchers from the [...]The post Anti-epilepsy drug preserves brain function after stroke appeared first on PsyPost.
Making Stress Your Friend - It's All In Your Mindset “The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.”  William James I first began to re-think the way I think about stress when I saw Dr. Kelly McGonigal’s wonderful TED talk on the topic.  As a stress management and burnout prevention coach, and as someone who has experienced a great deal of stress in my life, I am well aware of how chronic stress can wreak havoc on your health and happiness.  I experienced frequent panic attacks both during law school and when I was burning out.  Panic attacks and chronic stress in general can zap your energy in lots of ways, so choosing how to respond to stress gives you control when you need it the most and can make a world of difference to your health and well-being. While it’s no secret that sustained levels of stress are not good for your health, there is more to the stress story than “stress is bad.”  As it turns out, how you perceive stress is just as important as the amount of stress you’re experiencing.  Specifically, individuals who both perceived that stress affects their health and who also reported a large amount of stress had a 43% increased risk of premature death (Keller et al., 2012). When people think that they have the resources sufficient to deal with a stressor, they experience a challenge response.  Challenge responses are typically associated with positive psychological and physiological outcomes.  In fact, participants in one study who were instructed to rethink stress as functional were able to recall more available resources and had improved cardiovascular functioning.  Conversely, when people perceive their resources to be lacking under stress, they experience a threat response.  Threat responses have been shown to impair decision-making in the short-term and are associated with brain aging, cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease in the long-term (Jamieson, Nock, & Mendes, 2012). The goal is not to decrease the level of stress or to erase it completely, both of which feel impossible in the moment; rather, the goal is to reshape how you interpret stress (e.g., first thinking that this stressor is here to help me in some way). Adopting these two strategies will help you be better able to reframe stressful events. Develop a “stress helps” mindset.  Your stress mindset is your belief about whether stress has enhancing or debilitating consequences.  The type of mindset you adopt about stress – either a “stress helps” mindset or a “stress hurts” mindset – highly influences psychological, physiological and behavioral outcomes.  While chronic stress is not good for your health, some stress can impact your health in positive ways and aid physical recovery and immunity.  Research shows that those who adopted a “stress helps” mindset were more likely to seek out feedback and therefore grow as a result of experiencing stress and had more adaptive cortisol profiles under acute stress (Crum, Salovey, & Achor, 2013). Help others.  When I’m anxious about giving a presentation, the last thing I want to do is reach out to someone, especially a stranger, and tell him or her that I’m feeling butterflies.  My preference is to hole up by myself and try and “deal” with the emotions.  As it turns out, your stress response is actually pushing you to tell someone that you’re feeling stressed.  Helping behavior actually serves as a stress buffer and help given to others is a better predictor of health and well-being than indicators of social engagement or received social support.  In fact, experiencing stressful events significantly predicts increased mortality among those who had not helped other people in the past year, but among those who had provided help to others, there was no association between stress and mortality (Poulin et al., 2013). How do you interpret the stressors in your life?  Are they there to help you learn something, grow in a new direction, wake you up to life, or do they exist to take a toll on your health and well-being?  The choice is up to you. Paula Davis-Laack, JD, MAPP is a burnout prevention and resilience expert who helps companies and busy professionals prevent burnout and build stress resilience.  For lots of strategies and tips to prevent burnout and find more engagement at home and at work, click here for a free copy of Paula’s e-book, Addicted to Busy: Your Blueprint for Burnout Prevention.  Her website is www.pauladavislaack.com. References Crum, A.J., Salovey, P., & Achor, S. (2013).  Rethinking stress: The role of mindsets in determining the stress response.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 104(4), 716-733. Jamieson, J.P., Nock M.K., & Mendes, W.B. (2012).  Mind over matter: Reappraising arousal improves cardiovascular and cognitive responses to stress.  Journal of Experimental Psychology 141(3), 417-422. Keller, A., et al. (2012).  Does the perception that stress affects health matter? The association with health and mortality.  Health Psychology 31(5), 677-684. Poulin, M.J., Brown, S.J., Dillard A.J., & Smith, D.M. (2013).  Giving to others and the association between stress and mortality.  American Journal of Public Health, 103(9), 1649-1655. Image reprinted with permission of photspin.com.  Topics:  Stress Happiness Health Resilience Subtitle:  How a "stress helps" mindset fuels health and happiness Blog to Post to:  Pressure Proof Teaser Text:  When people think that they have the resources to deal with a stressor, they experience a challenge response. Conversely, when people perceive their resources to be lacking under stress, they experience a threat response. The goal is not to decrease the level of stress or to erase it completely; rather, the goal is to reshape how you interpret stress. Teaser Image:  Mature Audiences Only:  Content Topics:  Decision-Making Personality Leadership Resilience Cognition Happiness Burnout Health Stress Neuroscience Anxiety Quote
Possible use of medical marijuana for depression Scientists are studying chronic stress and depression, with a focus on endocannabinoids, which are brain chemicals similar to substances in marijuana.
Scientists find more DNA and extra copies of disease gene in Alzheimer’s brain cells Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found diverse genomic changes in single neurons from the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, pointing to an unexpected factor that may underpin the most common form of the disease. A new study, published February 4, 2015 in the online journal eLife, shows that Alzheimer’s brains commonly have many [...]The post Scientists find more DNA and extra copies of disease gene in Alzheimer’s brain cells appeared first on PsyPost.
Opioid and heroin crisis triggered by doctors overprescribing painkillers According to researchers at Brandeis University, the University of North Florida and Johns Hopkins University, policymakers must look beyond painkiller abuse, also called non-medical use, in their efforts to reduce opioid overdose deaths. In a comprehensive investigation, the scientists show that since 2002, new cases of non-medical abuse have declined, yet painkiller overdose deaths have [...]The post Opioid and heroin crisis triggered by doctors overprescribing painkillers appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain scans predict effectiveness of talk therapy to treat depression UNC School of Medicine researchers have shown that brain scans can predict which patients with clinical depression are most likely to benefit from a specific kind of talk therapy. The study, which was published today in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, is the first to use a technique known as resting-state functional brain connectivity MRI to identify [...]The post Brain scans predict effectiveness of talk therapy to treat depression appeared first on PsyPost.
Wealthier men less likely to help partners with housework, study finds Men on lower incomes are more likely to help their partners with housework than higher-earners, although women are still by far doing the most around the home, no matter how many hours they work or how much they are paid. While the burden of keeping the home clean is starting to be shared more equally [...]The post Wealthier men less likely to help partners with housework, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Learn Mindfulness From a Child The practice of mindfulness is being adopted across industries and age groups, with Google blazing the corporate trail by offering “mindful lunches” and an in-house program called “Search Inside Yourself.” Celebrities and corporate leaders, including Oprah Winfrey and Arianna Huffington, regularly espouse the benefits of this discipline. Elementary schools are...
Does your child have a learning disability? Here’s what to look out for For some children, despite having no known physical or mental disability, learning to read, write, spell, do maths, dress, throw and catch a ball, or organise themselves presents significant challenges. When childhood milestones involving speech and movement are slow to develop in young children, should parents be concerned that their child might have a learning [...]The post Does your child have a learning disability? Here’s what to look out for appeared first on PsyPost.
Humans are wired for prejudice but that doesn’t have to be the end of the story Humans are highly social creatures. Our brains have evolved to allow us to survive and thrive in complex social environments. Accordingly, the behaviors and emotions that help us navigate our social sphere are entrenched in networks of neurons within our brains. Social motivations, such as the desire to be a member of a group or [...]The post Humans are wired for prejudice but that doesn’t have to be the end of the story appeared first on PsyPost.
How To Connect With Your Partner I ask most of my clients this question: “What do you want from your relationship?” Just about all of them say the same thing. They say, “I want to feel connected.” Then they go on and tell me all the ways that they behave which keep them from connecting. It’s...
Are You Struggling? Support Changes Everything My friend, let’s call her Tara, recently got diagnosed with cancer. Her friends hooked her up with the MealTrain. While she heals, Tara can have warm, healthy and nutritious meals delivered to her door. Tara told me she was surprised at how good it felt to get this support, love and...
Can Facebook cause depression? Researchers found that those who engage in "surveillance usage," comparing the lives of others to their own, often experience feelings of envy and depression.
How the brains of “SuperAgers” are different The brains of a select group of elderly people look very different from many of their peers, according to a recently published study.