Article Description
Music teachers share their unique perspective on music education in America Across the country music teachers believe that factors at the school level have the greatest impact on their programs. Matters beyond the school are not seen as having a significant influence on their programs, even though district, state and national educational policies have an effect on music education; according to a new study published in [...]The post Music teachers share their unique perspective on music education in America appeared first on PsyPost.
Good sleep gets harder as we age, but mindfulness could help Getting a good night’s sleep can be challenging, especially as we age. About half of all older adults report sleeping difficulties. This can make them more likely to experience physical or mental health conditions, memory problems, and falls, due to poor balance. Older adults also have less deep sleep than younger people and their sleep [...]The post Good sleep gets harder as we age, but mindfulness could help appeared first on PsyPost.
Should We Fan the Romantic Flame? All human experiences, including romantic ones, can be boring. The remedy for boredom is often change and novelty. Should we then change our romantic partners in order to fan our romantic flames? Although change is indeed essential to emotional intensity, there are several types of changes, and emotional intensity is far from being the whole story when it comes to romance.
They Talk, We Listen "I don’t know what happened, my Sweet Girl is gone. Yesterday she left in the morning and didn’t even say good-bye. She just left. I waited all day yesterday and she never came home, and today she’s still not home. I am really, really sad. I don’t even know what I am going to do with myself."
The Surprising Benefits of Documenting Ordinary Experiences Typically it’s the big milestones that we document most diligently—the weddings, births, graduations, professional achievements. These are the events we expect we’ll most want to revisit down the road. But research suggests that revisiting ordinary, everyday experiences can bring us a lot more pleasure than we realize.
How do you forgive a monster? How do you forgive a monster? A must-read for true crime enthusiasts is this in-depth profile of Kerry Rawson, who's spent the past 10 years dealing with the psychological effects of finding out that her dad, Dennis Rader, was the notorious BTK serial killer....
Newly discovered neurons predict the cooperative behavior of others Social interactions rely on the ability to anticipate others’ intentions and actions, and identifying neurons that reflect another individual’s so-called “state of mind” has been a long-sought goal in neuroscience. A study published February 26th in the journal Cell reveals that a newly discovered set of neurons in a frontal brain region called the anterior cingulate [...]The post Newly discovered neurons predict the cooperative behavior of others appeared first on PsyPost.
Teacher prejudices put girls off math, science It’s a fact: Women are vastly underrepresented in the fields of computer science, engineering, and mathematics. But less clear are the trajectories — academic and otherwise — that lead young women toward other professions. Higher education has already opened the door to equal opportunities for women and minorities in the U.S. — so is it [...]The post Teacher prejudices put girls off math, science appeared first on PsyPost.
Study details the degree to which urban movement is linked to social activity If you live in a city, you know that a fair amount of your movement around town is social in nature. But how much, exactly? A new study co-authored by MIT researchers uses a new method to infer that around one-fifth of urban movement is strictly social, a finding that holds up consistently in multiple [...]The post Study details the degree to which urban movement is linked to social activity appeared first on PsyPost.
Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may control brain serotonin Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI), serotonin [...]The post Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may control brain serotonin appeared first on PsyPost.
The Perfect Office Design: Does Your Office Measure Up? I’m a huge fan of the work of Christopher Alexander, and yesterday, for the hundredth time, I found myself urging someone to read his book, A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction. This strange, brilliant, fascinating book uses architecture, sociology, psychology, and anthropology to describe the most satisfying environments. Instead of talking...
7 Things Sex Addiction Doesn’t Want You to Know! Hi there – my name is sex addiction. You know me by several other names, including sex addict, behavioral addiction and process addiction. I’m an insidious form of dependency that is often not discussed with anyone because I use shame and guilt to silence you. If left unchecked, I grow in...
Is Good Psychotherapy Worth the Investment? Nick, age 55, gets unstuck when he and wife Barbara join together to invest in their own depth therapy to deal with how to feel passion, be more cognitively flexible, and create a happier marriage. They are glad they did.
Snow and The Choice of Joy I grew up in a warm country, and always fantasized about the snow. It seemed magical, romantic, beautiful, and the ultimate state of calm. As a child, snow represented the world that is outside of my small country. A world that is vast and exciting, where white flakes fill the...
5 Tips to Manage Personal Relationships in the Workplace When we enter the workforce, we never want to be ‘that’ person: the one who got that job through their connection with the boss, or the employee who already has a romantic relationship with someone on staff. In these times, it can be hard to work with a clean slate. People can undermine your work, […]
Can Law Improve People's Lives? Can law make people's lives better? The answer is yes, and treating mental illness more effectively is one place to start.
Thinking of God makes people bigger risk-takers Reminders of God can make people more likely to seek out and take risks, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that people are willing to take these risks because they view God as providing security against potential negative outcomes. “References to God pervade [...]The post Thinking of God makes people bigger risk-takers appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers develop method for mapping neuron clusters A team of scientists has developed a method for identifying clusters of neurons that work in concert to guide the behavior. Their findings, which appear in the journal Neuron, address a long-standing mystery about the organization of the prefrontal cortex (PFC)–one of the most recently evolved parts of the primate brain that underlies complex cognitive [...]The post Researchers develop method for mapping neuron clusters appeared first on PsyPost.
Research suggests anesthetics could have long-term impact on children’s brains A group of anesthesiologists and toxicologists today issued a caution to parents and health care professionals about the use of general anesthetics in children. Each year millions of infants, toddlers and preschool children require anesthesia or sedation for various procedures. The University of Toronto’s Professor Beverley Orser and a team of anesthesiology investigators and toxicologists [...]The post Research suggests anesthetics could have long-term impact on children’s brains appeared first on PsyPost.
Optogenetic stimulation of the brain: Researchers use beams of light to control pain A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain. Samarendra Mohanty, an assistant professor of physics, leads the Biophysics and Physiology Lab in the UT Arlington [...]The post Optogenetic stimulation of the brain: Researchers use beams of light to control pain appeared first on PsyPost.