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Eating Popsicles in the Middle of the Night Eating in the middle of the night, not good. For some reason I have fallen into this habit recently, and can blame it on the sugar free Popsicles I bought at the store. I think just because it’s low in calorie content and sugar free that it’s okay to lie...
Long-term care may not be best for adults with traumatic brain injury; other housing needed A new, large-scale Canadian study shows that many adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) live in a long-term health setting – such as a nursing home- which may not be appropriate for their condition and younger age.
Brain metastases: Better outcomes for those under 50 years old receiving stereotactic radiosurgery alone Cancer patients with limited brain metastases (one to four tumors) who are under 50 years old should receive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) without whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), according to a study.
One step closer to defeating Alzheimer's disease Researchers show that toning down the activity of the receptor TREM2 may help put a stop to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.
Predators aren’t out there. They’re in here. A myth has been created over the years that predators are suspicious strangers lurking around the corner. Hence we have created a system in which convicted sexual molesters of children are required to notify authorities of where they live. Believing this myth, parents tell their children not to talk with...
Extroverts Come In Two Different Types, Brain Scans Reveal There are two types of extroverts, each with distinct brain anatomies. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is"Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Brain Scans Reveal Why Up To One in Six People Get SAD in Winter How The Brain Works During The Two Main Types of Meditation Brain Scans Can Predict The Best Type of Depression Treatment For an Individual Meditation’s Widespread Effect on How The Brain Ages Debunked: ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personalities
Website Dictionary for Therapists I’ve been watching therapists in Facebook groups talk about how to build a website. Sometimes the information provided is FANTASTIC! However, sometimes, people with limited knowledge are spreading incomplete, or incorrect information. I’m a therapist. I’ve launched a cash-pay private practice from nothing. I’ve also built at least a hundred...
New target identified in fight against Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases.
Forgiveness and Your Health A new study shows that forgiveness can be a strong predictor of different measures of cardiovascular health for both husbands and wives. Even when marital satisfaction was taken into account, people scoring high on forgiveness measures had lower heart rates, blood pressure, and better cardiovascular efficiency than subjects with continued to hold grudges.
Adolescent Self-Management for a Successful Independence A major goal of parenting high school age adolescents is helping them develop basic skills of self-management that will support more independence soon to come.
5 Things Everyone Should Know about Resilience When we speak of someone being "resilient," we tend to think of it as a character strength. But what is resilience anyway, and what does it take to weather the setbacks in life? A look at the research reveals much...
Midlife: Adult's Prime Why middle age truly is the prime of life.
Alzheimer amyloid clumps found in young adult brains Amyloid -- an abnormal protein that's a hallmark of Alzheimer's -- starts accumulating inside neurons of people as young as 20, reports a study. This is the first time amyloid accumulation has been shown in such young human brains. Small toxic amyloid clumps were found in neurons of deceased young adults. The clumps grew larger in the brains of normal older adults and those with Alzheimer's. The clumps likely damage and eventually kill memory-related neurons.
Heart valve repair significantly improves emotional wellbeing in patients with mitral regurgitation Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) often suffer from psycho-emotional symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but after undergoing mitral valve repair surgery patients experience a marked improvement in emotional and physical wellbeing, scientists report.
The History of Psychology Roundup: From LSD to Lobotomies It’s been a while — like a few years! — since I’ve shared the latest links on the history of psychology. But I think it’s important to take a look back. In order to know where we’re going, it’s important to know where we’ve been. Plus, the journey is rarely...
You’re How Old? And You Have ADHD? I have a problem. Well, I have lots of problems, but I have one I’d like to share. It’s my age, or rather, my ages. I have ADHD, so I have a chronological age, a physical age, an emotional age, and an age based on how much time it feels...
How to Make Your Own Drugs As I mentioned in my last article, when we are in perfect health we make all the drugs we need; this is referred to as the endogenous pharmacy. The brain writes prescriptions, which are filled by the various organs. We are all capable of developing the ability to positively influence...
What’s the deal with binge-eating and bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is hard to deal with even on good days. Medications help keep it “under control” but there is always the chance of breakthrough symptoms. To make matters worse, bipolar disorder is often accompanied by other, physical symptoms that may seem unrelated at all. Arthritis? Asthma? It hardly seems...
Bad Bad Burn REVIEW, RESET, RETURN So, here we are.  The crash and burn…   Not because you don’t have good intentions.  You love your family soo much, you never meant to hurt anyone. It all just got out of control. A person with bipolar can feel like everything is in ultra super max...
The scientist as problem solver Start the week with one of the founding fathers of cognitive science: in ‘The scientist as problem solver‘, Herb Simon (1916-2001) gives a short retrospective of his scientific career. To tell the story of the research he has done, he advances a thesis: “The Scientist is a problem solver. If the thesis is true, then […]