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It’s okay to move back in with your parents. In the fall of 2008 I had, what you might consider, a nervous breakdown. I tried to kill myself – to end my life. After a few days in both the intensive care unit and the psych ward, I was released. But I had to leave my new job and...
Longing for Lasting Happiness? Avoid this ONE Word! Quit “should”-ing all over yourself. I should get my car washed. I should pay my bills. I should eat less. I should wake up earlier on weekends. We fill our lives with shoulds and shouldn’ts. Shoulds keep us on the straight and narrow path of responsibility, but do they simultaneously...
Study: 1 in 5 female high school students have experienced dating violence A survey of U.S. high school students suggests that 1 in 5 female students and 1 in 10 male students who date have experienced some form of teen dating violence during the past 12 months, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s national Youth Risk Behavior [...]The post Study: 1 in 5 female high school students have experienced dating violence appeared first on PsyPost.
Alzheimer’s amyloid clumps found in young adult brains Amyloid — an abnormal protein whose accumulation in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease — starts accumulating inside neurons of people as young as 20, a much younger age than scientists ever imagined, reports a surprising new Northwestern Medicine study. Scientists believe this is the first time amyloid accumulation has been shown in [...]The post Alzheimer’s amyloid clumps found in young adult brains appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuron groups, not single cells, maintain brain stability To compensate for erratic shifts and spikes in its neuronal communications, the brain relies on the stabilizing mechanism called “homeostasis” — the ability to maintain relatively stable equilibrium between different elements of its composition — to preserve overall network function. Disruptions in stability cause disorders such as epilepsy, but precious little is known about this [...]The post Neuron groups, not single cells, maintain brain stability appeared first on PsyPost.
Anxious people more apt to make bad decisions amid uncertainty Highly anxious people have more trouble deciding how best to handle life’s uncertainties. They may even catastrophize, interpreting, say, a lovers’ tiff as a doomed relationship or a workplace change as a career threat. In gauging people’s response to unpredictability, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Oxford found that people [...]The post Anxious people more apt to make bad decisions amid uncertainty appeared first on PsyPost.
Remyelination: How an FDA-approved drug boosts myelin synthesis Damage to myelin, the fatty insulator that enables communication between nerve cells, characterizes multiple sclerosis (MS) and other devastating neurological diseases. The damage doesn’t come all at once: There is a “honeymoon” period during which some regeneration of myelin, called remyelination, does occur, but this ability to regenerate dissipates as the disease progresses and the [...]The post Remyelination: How an FDA-approved drug boosts myelin synthesis appeared first on PsyPost.
Teenager with stroke symptoms actually had Lyme disease A Swiss teenager, recently returned home from a discotheque, came to the emergency department with classic sudden symptoms of stroke, only to be diagnosed with Lyme disease, clinicians report.
Income inequality is taking a toll on the health of American workers “Income inequality” has already become a buzz phrase for the campaigns leading up to the 2016 elections. Likely candidates and pundits on both ends of the political spectrum have begun to talk about how fairness, social justice and — even after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act — the cost of health care insurance [...]The post Income inequality is taking a toll on the health of American workers appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain waves: Basal forebrain neurons fine-tune consciousness by synchronizing rhythms in the cortex Researchers have identified a group of neurons in the basal forebrain that help synchronize activity in the cortex, triggering brain waves that are characteristic of consciousness, perception and attention.
Longer duration of prescribed anti-smoking medication before quitting appears promising Smokers may be more likely to successfully quit their habit if simple adjustments were made to how an existing anti-smoking medication is prescribed, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo research team. Tobacco use is the nation’s leading cause of preventable death, claiming more than 480,000 lives annually; that’s about one in [...]The post Longer duration of prescribed anti-smoking medication before quitting appears promising appeared first on PsyPost.
Why some brain cancers resist treatment Scientists may have discovered why some brain cancer patients develop resistance to standard treatments including radiation and the chemotherapy agent temozolomide.
Despite federal law, some insurance exchange plans offer unequal mental health coverage One-quarter of the health plans being sold on health insurance exchanges set up through the Affordable Care Act offer benefits that appear to violate a federal law requiring equal benefits for general medical and mental health care, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The law – known [...]The post Despite federal law, some insurance exchange plans offer unequal mental health coverage appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Successful cognitive behavioral therapy in youth equals decreased thinking about suicide Penn Medicine researchers found that patients who did not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in childhood had more chronic and enduring patterns of suicidal ideation at 7 to 19 years after treatment. This study adds to the literature that suggests that successful CBT for childhood anxiety confers long-term benefits. The complete study [...]The post Study: Successful cognitive behavioral therapy in youth equals decreased thinking about suicide appeared first on PsyPost.
Double Trouble: Two Bad Habits That Kill Relationships Your feelings are hurt. That’s understandable. What you do at this point could make the difference between resolution and even more hurt feelings. Take the wrong turn and your feelings will continue to be trampled upon. Your relationship will suffer, according to research. Take the right turn and you have...
Focusing on the success of others can make us selfish It is believed that the success of humans as a species depends to a large extent on our ability to cooperate in groups. Much more so than any other ape (or mammal for that matter), people are able to work together and coordinate their actions to produce mutual benefits. But what do we base our [...]The post Focusing on the success of others can make us selfish appeared first on PsyPost.
How men use the word ‘drama’ to win fights against women There are sociological, even biological, differences between how men and women handle conflict.
Too much Facebook leads to depression Constantly checking Facebook to see what your friends are doing could lead to some serious depression.
Before and After: An Obliger Figures Out How To Occasionally, I post an interesting before-and-after story submitted by a reader, about how he or she successfully changed a habit.  I love to hear people’s stories about habit change. We can all learn from each other. If you’d like to share your story, contact me here. This week’s story comes...
The Inverse Innovation Cycle: How Failure Becomes Success It may be true that a checklist will help you reach an opportunity more efficiently.