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Repairing the cerebral cortex: It can be done An important step in the area of cell therapy has been taken by scientists: repairing the cerebral cortex of the adult mouse using a graft of cortical neurons derived from embryonic stem cells. These results also suggest that damaged circuits can be restored only by using neurons of the same type as the damaged area.
Brain processes ongoing pain more emotionally A momentary lapse of concentration is all it takes for a finger to become trapped or sprain an ankle -- and it hurts. Pain is the body's protective mechanism and a complex neurological phenomenon. Moreover, ongoing pain in the sense of chronic pain can be a disease, clinicians say. Scientists have now demonstrated that already during a few minutes of ongoing pain, the underlying brain activity changes by shifting from sensory to emotional processes.
Brain waves predict our risk for insomnia There may not yet be a cure for insomnia, but researchers are a step closer to predicting who is most likely to suffer from it -- just in time for World Sleep Day on March 13. Researchers note that we should all keep abiding by the habits already acknowledged to promote a good night's sleep: "Avoid sources of stress when going to bed, preserve the bedroom environment for sleep and not for work, and avoid stimulation. Find ways to relax before going to sleep."
Francis “Frank” J. Underwood From Netflix’s House of Cards I always like to take the opportunity to explain misunderstood psychiatric concepts or diagnoses, and to clarify when a psychiatric term is used incorrectly or prone to misinterpretation. In today’s blog, I aim to do both of these things.
Michelle Duggar Opens Up About Struggle With Bulimia Michelle Duggar is usually busy talking about her expansive family on 19 Kids and Counting but the story garnering attention right now is about her own struggle with bulimia as a teenager. The surprising revelation was disclosed in Growing Up Duggar, a new book written by the family’s oldest daughters,...
In Defense of Time-Outs. Sometimes. I’m in the mud right now with my four year old. She’s been talking back and having tantrums on a daily basis. Between her explosions and this miserable winter and all of the mundane details of life that require my ongoing attention, well, I’m worn a little thin. I suspect...
The Ambiguities of Progress Rather than thinking about change in terms of progress or decline, it is better to focus on trade-offs.
Five Myths About Mental Toughness       When it comes to mental toughness, there’s no shortage of tag lines. We are told to fight harder, never give up, never admit defeat, and to have the mind of a champion. Yet for all the inspirational quotes mental toughness inspires, many continue to wonder, what does...
Massachusetts Psychiatric Patients Get Right to Fresh Air A month ago, Massachusetts became one of the only governments in the world to recognize that its citizens have a basic human right to fresh air — especially while undergoing treatment for a mental illness. Outgoing Governor Deval Patrick surprised mental health advocates with his signing into law the “Fresh...
Empathy Erosion and Treating People Like Objects Empathy erosion occurs when people fail to attend to the humanity—the feelings, interests, kinship, etc—of others. Either they don’t cognitively understand others’ feelings or they aren’t emotionally affected by others’ feelings.
The Number of Alcoholic Drinks That Makes You Look More Attractive The amount of alcohol that makes the drinker themselves look more attractive to others. » Continue reading: The Number of Alcoholic Drinks That Makes You Look More Attractive » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:The Facial Expression That Makes You Appear Smarter Attractive Students Get Higher Grades The Cheerleader Effect: Why People Appear Better-Looking in Groups Alcohol’s Surprising Influence on Memory Loss in Later Years Are Sexy People Really More Selfish? New Study Reveals Men and Women Differ
Panetics Ever heard of Panetics? “Sitting atop the evolutionary pinnacle, Homo sapience is now  the most vulnerable of all organisms when it comes to suffering. … We would do almost anything to preclude, reduce, or cease our own suffering. Yet we ...
Another Spin on the Marriage-Go-Round: New Data on Americans You don’t need to be an American to know that Americans just love marriage. Matrimania – the over-the-top hyping of marriage, coupling, and weddings – is pervasive. But the evidence for our special relationship with marriage is not just in the popularity of shows like The Bachelor or the tedious...
Forecast of Acceptance Nothing of significance happened yesterday: just Universe stepping on its own toes all over the place. Same forecast for today. And for the day after tomorrow. – www.pavelsomov.com...
Gene linked with early epilepsy discovered Certain types of early-onset epilepsy are caused by previously unknown mutations of a potassium channel gene, KCNA2. The mutations disrupt the electrical balance in the brain in two ways. In some patients, the flow of potassium is greatly reduced; while in others, it is raised enormously. Both states can lead to hard-to-treat epileptic seizures. New information may lead to a treatment to help prevent poor brain development in some cases, researchers say.
Dark neural patches explored Researchers have found a surprise upon mapping the precise connectivity inside a brain structure called the neostriatum. The cell groups here do not seem to be talking to each other, and are less interdependent in their functioning than previously suspected.
Computer model explains how brain learns to categorize A computer model has been devised to explain how a neural circuit learns to classify sensory stimuli into discrete categories, such as "car vs. motorcycle." Their findings shed new light on the brain processes underpinning judgments we make on a daily basis.
Collusion? Where the APA Investigator Should Look There have been many allegations that the American Psychological Association colluded with the Bush Administration to support the use of psychologists in abusive detention and interrogation operations. APA’s standard response has followed the CIA’s unofficial motto: “Admit nothing. Deny everything. Make counter-accusations.” But now an investigation is finally underway.
Are You Too Clingy? Too Distant? Or Is Your Partner? Our childhood experiences can influence us in our day-to-day adult lives, especially in the arena of intimate relationships. Are you able to find the balance between being yourself and part of a dyad? If not, you should probably read this...
12 Steps to Knock Out that ‘Out of Control’ Get going! Life’s waiting for you. It’s that time of year when many people resolve to make changes relating to everything from finance to fitness. Unfortunately, by February, a good majority of us will have settled (un)comfortably back into old habits and will find ourselves feeling just slightly more powerless...