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Myths and Misconceptions in Psychology In their wonderful book Lilienfeld and colleagues list 250 myths and misconceptions from the world of psychology. In a study we tested to what extent ordinary people thought them to be true. The results are surprising.
Stopping Your Addiction to Stealing Kleptomania is a serious impulse control disorder. It is a failure to resist urges to steal items that you don’t really need. It causes emotional pain to you and to loved ones if it is not treated and causes emotional or behavioral problems to self-control. Kleptomania makes a person feel guilty...
Healthy eating, exercise, and brain-training program results in slower mental decline for older people A comprehensive program providing older people at risk of dementia with healthy eating guidance, exercise, brain training, and management of metabolic and vascular risk factors appears to slow down cognitive decline, according to the first ever randomized controlled trial of its kind.
One Way to Use Someone Else to Strengthen Your In Better Than Before, my book about habit change, I outline twenty-one strategies we can use to change our habits. Don’t be alarmed: twenty-one may seem like a huge number, but it’s actually good — it means that each of us has many options from which to choose. In different situations,...
How The Phrase, “What’s Wrong with You?” Can Harm Children What’s wrong with saying the phrase “What Is Wrong with You?” to children or adolescents? Nothing, if your tone is compassion and you are wondering if they want to share their feelings with you. But that is different from what we hear far too often when a parent is exasperated with a child, throwing up their hands in desperation, and asking this question.
One Phrase We Should All Stop Saying to Kids Today What’s wrong with saying the phrase “What Is Wrong with You?” to children or adolescents? Nothing, if your tone is compassionate and you are wondering if they want to share their feelings with you. But that is different from what we hear far too often when a parent is exasperated with a child, throwing up their hands in desperation, and asking this question.
Religion and support for birth control health coverage can mix New research debunks the assumption that a woman’s religion predicts her views on policies affecting reproductive health care such as insurance coverage for birth control. Even when it comes to policies that have sometimes been characterized as going against Christian views – such as the Affordable Care Act mandate for employer-provided contraception coverage- religious women’s [...]The post Religion and support for birth control health coverage can mix appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Let Someone Love You: 10 Key Insights Have you realized that you need to consciously allow another person to love you? If you’re not used to being loved, your default position may be to push people away. For example, a reader recently wrote: I got really close to someone, then I did what I always do, I...
The brain processes ongoing pain more emotionally A momentary lapse of concentration is all it takes for a finger to become trapped or sprain an ankle – and it hurts. Pain is the body’s protective mechanism and a complex neurological phenomenon. Moreover, ongoing pain in the sense of chronic pain can be a disease. Scientists from Technische Universität München (TUM) have now [...]The post The brain processes ongoing pain more emotionally appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists develop computer model explaining how brain learns to categorize New York University researchers have devised a computer model to explain how a neural circuit learns to classify sensory stimuli into discrete categories, such as “car vs. motorcycle.” Their findings, which appear in the journal Nature Communications, shed new light on the brain processes underpinning judgments we make on a daily basis. “Categorization is vital [...]The post Scientists develop computer model explaining how brain learns to categorize appeared first on PsyPost.
Exercise may help keep seniors moving longer despite old age brain decline Older people who are physically active may be protecting themselves from the effects of small areas of brain damage that can affect their movement abilities, according to a new study published in the March 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Many older people have small areas [...]The post Exercise may help keep seniors moving longer despite old age brain decline appeared first on PsyPost.
Harder-to-abuse OxyContin doesn’t stop illicit use A reformulation of OxyContin that makes it harder to abuse has curtailed the drug’s illicit use. But some 25 percent of drug abusers entering rehab said they still abused the prescription painkiller despite package labeling that emphasizes its abuse-deterrent properties, new research indicates. The study, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. [...]The post Harder-to-abuse OxyContin doesn’t stop illicit use appeared first on PsyPost.
Gender and race influences when teens start drinking, smoking and doing drugs Cigarette use among white teenagers is substantially higher than among black and Hispanic teenagers, especially at 18 years old, according to Penn State researchers. Alcohol and marijuana use are also higher in white teenagers, and the numbers continue to increase until age 20. Throughout their 20s, blacks and Hispanics are more likely to pick up [...]The post Gender and race influences when teens start drinking, smoking and doing drugs appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows feasibility of blood-based test for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease UCLA researchers have provided the first evidence that a simple blood test could be developed to confirm the presence of beta amyloid proteins in the brain, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Although approximately 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, no reliable blood-based test currently exists for the neurodegenerative disorder that is the [...]The post Study shows feasibility of blood-based test for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Healing after Trauma: Ten Steps Forward, Nine Steps Back Most of us have suffered psychological wounds. Just as the body can be damaged, so can the mind. But the similarity ends there, because mental and physical injuries heal by different means. At another time I’ll explore physical healing in detail, but for now a brief outline will suffice: A...
STOP Catastrophizing I’m really good at catastrophizing. I’ve even ended up overdosing and in the hospital because of it. What is “catastrophizing?” It’s mental health jargon for thinking the worse thing that can happen, will happen. For me, it is a snowball rolling down a hill. One “bad” thing happens and then...
Sexy soldiers? Study reveals sexual appeal of war heroes Women are more attracted to war heroes than regular soldiers or men who display heroic traits in other fields, such as in sports or natural disaster work, according to new research from the University of Southampton and partners in Europe. The findings also suggest that men did not find heroism to be a sexually attractive [...]The post Sexy soldiers? Study reveals sexual appeal of war heroes appeared first on PsyPost.
Meta-study shows that depression alters the experience of time Time perception is highly subjective and usually depends on the relevant situation so that, for instance, your sense of how fast or slow time is passing can be influenced by whether you are waiting for something or if a deadline is approaching. Patients suffering from depression appear to experience time differently than healthy individuals. Statements [...]The post Meta-study shows that depression alters the experience of time appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Very encouraging results': Yoga could lessen prenatal depression, study suggests In a small pilot study, researchers at Brown University, Butler Hospital, and Women & Infants’ Hospital have found evidence suggesting that yoga could help pregnant women with significant depression reduce the severity of the mood disorder. Lead author Cynthia Battle said she learned in prior research that depressed pregnant women are often reluctant to use [...]The post ‘Very encouraging results': Yoga could lessen prenatal depression, study suggests appeared first on PsyPost.
Study reveals how genetic changes lead to familial Alzheimer’s disease Mutations in the presenilin-1 gene are the most common cause of inherited, early-onset forms of Alzheimer’s disease. In a new study, published in Neuron, scientists replaced the normal mouse presenilin-1 gene with Alzheimer’s-causing forms of the human gene to discover how these genetic changes may lead to the disorder. Their surprising results may transform the [...]The post Study reveals how genetic changes lead to familial Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.