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Is it dementia, or just normal aging? New tool may help triage Researchers at Mayo Clinic developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia. The study is published in the March 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [...]The post Is it dementia, or just normal aging? New tool may help triage appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists discover a new cause of epilepsy: Astrocyte uncoupling Epilepsy is a very prevalent neurological disorder. Approximately one-third of patients are resistant to currently available therapies. A team of researchers under the guidance of the Institute of Cellular Neurosciences at the University of Bonn has discovered a new cause to explain the development of temporal lobe epilepsy: At an early stage, astrocytes are uncoupled [...]The post Scientists discover a new cause of epilepsy: Astrocyte uncoupling appeared first on PsyPost.
A speech-based system for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease Alzheimer’s disease is the most significant cause of dementia in the elderly: it affects over 35 million people worldwide. It is reckoned that Alzheimer’s could reach epidemic proportions in developed countries unless therapies to cure or prevent it are obtained. Studies conducted so far reveal that the therapies are more effective when they are applied [...]The post A speech-based system for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Anthropologists study the hormonal basis of affiliation and competition in the Bolivian Amazon Absence, it seems, really does make the heart grow fonder. That’s according to research conducted by UC Santa Barbara anthropologists, who found that levels of the “love” hormone oxytocin increases among Tsimane men when they come home to their families after a day of hunting. The researchers also found that the increase in oxytocin was [...]The post Anthropologists study the hormonal basis of affiliation and competition in the Bolivian Amazon appeared first on PsyPost.
Finding support for surgery on Facebook For many, Facebook connects friends, family, and others with common interests. Despite the popularity of social networking sites like Facebook, scientists are only beginning to learn how they affect human interaction. In a recent study published by the journal Social Science & Medicine, Dartmouth researchers examined nearly 9,000 Facebook conversations to better understand how people [...]The post Finding support for surgery on Facebook appeared first on PsyPost.
Parenting Advice: Understanding Your Teen’s Cyberlife Like it or not, this is the world your kids are living in. You have to learn to live in it, too. Unlike my parents, I have always had indoor plumbing. I am guessing when they first started putting toilets in homes that more than one person protested. “In the...
The Break-up I have been with my boyfriend for over 5 & 1/2 years. That is more than half a decade. That is a long time. Today he broke up with me, saying we should “go our separate ways.” In a TEXT message. 5 & 1/2 years and I get a text...
Discovery of how malaria kills children will lead to life-saving treatments In a groundbreaking study, researchers have discovered what causes death in children with cerebral malaria, the deadliest form of the disease. Theresearch team found that the brain becomes so swollen it is forced out through the bottom of the skull and compresses the brain stem. This pressure causes the children to stop breathing and die.
Are You A Modern Day Cinderella? Many women model their lives after one of the most famous (and most exhausted) female characters of all, Cinderella — not the glass slipper and ball gown Cinderella but the work-her-fingers-to-the-bone-exhausted Cinderella, who desperately needs a vacation and some beauty rest. You think you are not working as hard as...
Are antipsychotic drugs more dangerous to dementia patients than we think? Drugs aimed at quelling the behavior problems of dementia patients may also hasten their deaths more than previously realized, a new study finds. The research adds more troubling evidence to the case against antipsychotic drugs as a treatment for the delusions, hallucinations, agitation and aggression that many people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias experience. [...]The post Are antipsychotic drugs more dangerous to dementia patients than we think? appeared first on PsyPost.
Is too much artificial light at night making us sick? Modern life, with its preponderance of inadequate exposure to natural light during the day and overexposure to artificial light at night, is not conducive to the body’s natural sleep/wake cycle. It’s an emerging topic in health, one that UConn Health (University of Connecticut, Farmington, Conn.) cancer epidemiologist Richard Stevens has been studying for three decades. [...]The post Is too much artificial light at night making us sick? appeared first on PsyPost.
Psychologists and roboticists team up to show how bodily posture may affect memory and learning An Indiana University cognitive scientist and collaborators have found that posture is critical in the early stages of acquiring new knowledge. The study, conducted by Linda Smith, a professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, in collaboration with a roboticist from England and a developmental psychologist [...]The post Psychologists and roboticists team up to show how bodily posture may affect memory and learning appeared first on PsyPost.
Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability Longer duration of breastfeeding is linked with increased intelligence in adulthood, longer schooling, and higher adult earnings, a study following a group of almost 3500 newborns for 30 years published in The Lancet Global Health journal has found. “The effect of breastfeeding on brain development and child intelligence is well established, but whether these effects [...]The post Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability appeared first on PsyPost.
Is Introversion Interfering With Your Friendships? You might not need a lot of friends and you might not need to see them often, but you do need friends. Introversion is no excuse--or reason--for letting friendships lapse.
How to Start Over — Starting With You Often when a couple with a long history together comes to me in an attempt to save their relationship, I find myself recommending that they ritualistically end the old relationship — even if they want to stay together. It is a bit akin to having the right ingredients for a...
Sadistic Sex: Orientation, Addiction or Lifestyle? The mother of a 15 year old boy recently reached out to one of my colleagues for advice regarding her son’s seemingly out-of-control preoccupation with kinky sex and highly sadistic pornography. (This boy was described as bright, poopular and high functioning). The response among my fellow clinicians was mixed. Sexual...
Self-disclosures Increase Attraction The sense of closeness increases if self-disclosures are emotional rather than factual.
Do Dog People and Cat People Differ in Terms of Dominance? New data suggests that dog people and cat people are selecting their preferred pets because they complement their own personality
Actual Reality tested in functional assessment post-TBI Actual Reality has been described as a new tool for assessing performance of activities of everyday life in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A new article outlines the first study examining the use of Actual Reality in the TBI population.
Brain networks differ among those with severe schizophrenia, study shows People with a severe form of schizophrenia have major differences in their brain networks compared to others with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy individuals, a new study shows. Schizophrenia, which affects one in 100 people, is generally known for symptoms of delusions and hallucinations, which can be treated with antipsychotic medications. However, lack of motivation and social withdrawal are also characteristic symptoms of the illness.