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Blockbusters: Can EEGs predict a movie’s success better than surveys? Seventy five percent of movies earn a net loss during their run in theaters. A new study in the Journal of Marketing Research finds that brain activity visible through EEG measures may be a much cheaper and more accurate way to predict the commercial success of movies. “Several decades of research have shown that many important [...]The post Blockbusters: Can EEGs predict a movie’s success better than surveys? appeared first on PsyPost.
Understanding faith and teaching evolution not mutually exclusive: study Discussing the relationship between science and faith, rather than avoiding the discussion, may better prepare future high school biology teachers for anticipating questions about evolution, according to Penn State political scientists. In a series of focus group meetings with biology students at four Pennsylvania institutions — three universities and a college — students from a [...]The post Understanding faith and teaching evolution not mutually exclusive: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Parkinson’s disease patients have reduced visual contrast acuity Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often have difficulties with visual acuity in low-contrast images. Because they may have normal high-contrast vision, this is often overlooked during routine eye exams. In the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, researchers report that PD patients had significantly worse vision for low-contrast images at close (40 cm) and [...]The post Parkinson’s disease patients have reduced visual contrast acuity appeared first on PsyPost.
The Lies Our Abuse Tells Us For years now I’ve heard the statement “Depression Lies” circling around blogs and social media. It’s true. Depression does lie. It tells us we’re lazy, a burden to our friends and, sometimes, of so little value that the world would be a better place without us. I wish every depression...
Vaccine hesitancy: A PLOS Currents collection investigating vaccination decision-making Researchers explore individuals’ confidence or reluctance to vaccinate their families and the associated effects on global health, in a collection published on February 25, 2015 by the open-access journal, PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. The collection is accompanied by the editorial “Hesitancy, trust and individualism in vaccination decision-making” by Jonathan E. Suk et al. from the European [...]The post Vaccine hesitancy: A PLOS Currents collection investigating vaccination decision-making appeared first on PsyPost.
Unusual disease that causes acute confusion may be underdiagnosed An unusual disease called Susac syndrome, which can cause acute confusion and problems with hearing and eyesight, is rare but probably under reported, Loyola University Medical Center physicians report in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. Classical neurology textbooks do not list Susac syndrome as a possible diagnosis of acute confusional states. And Susac [...]The post Unusual disease that causes acute confusion may be underdiagnosed appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows less aggressive behavior toward strangers in autism spectrum disorder model While aggression toward caregivers and peers is a challenge faced by many individuals and families dealing with autism, there has been much speculation in the media over the possibility of generally heightened aggression in those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. A new study by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) [...]The post Study shows less aggressive behavior toward strangers in autism spectrum disorder model appeared first on PsyPost.
People-persons vs go-getters: Study maps extroversion types in the brain’s anatomy Everyday experience and psychological studies alike tell us that there are two different types of extroverts: The gregarious “people-persons” who find reward in sharing affection and affiliation with others, and the ambitious “go-getters” who flash those bright-white smiles in their pursuit of achievement and leadership agendas. A new study shows that these overlapping yet distinct [...]The post People-persons vs go-getters: Study maps extroversion types in the brain’s anatomy appeared first on PsyPost.
Criminologist’s study shows lack of mental health care for prisoners New research by a UT Dallas criminologist has found that a substantial number of prison inmates have not received treatment for mental health conditions. Dr. Nadine M. Connell, assistant professor of criminology in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (EPPS), analyzed data from 18,185 inmates in state and federal correctional facilities for the [...]The post Criminologist’s study shows lack of mental health care for prisoners appeared first on PsyPost.
VIDEO: Open Your Heart to Love With This Yoga Flow We all want more love, right? But it’s impossible to fully give or receive love unless you have an open heart. Unfortunately, self-loathing, social conditioning, past hurts and even improper posture can lead us to feel that it is safer to close our hearts in order to avoid potential pain or...
Eating disorders linked with financial difficulties in female students Experiencing financial difficulties at university may increase the risk of female students developing an eating disorder, according to new research from the University of Southampton and Solent NHS Trust. Conversely, the study also found that having extreme attitudes to food and eating predicted short-term financial difficulties for female students, suggesting the possibility of a ‘vicious [...]The post Eating disorders linked with financial difficulties in female students appeared first on PsyPost.
Facebook in mourning: Mediatisation of death and RIP pages as virtual shrines In the wake of high a profile death, it is increasingly common to see mass public outpourings of grief on RIP Facebook pages. This article in New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia explores media coverage of death and its relation to public expression of grief via social media. Contemporary society is far removed from death; [...]The post Facebook in mourning: Mediatisation of death and RIP pages as virtual shrines appeared first on PsyPost.
Could research into oxytocin and alcohol lead to a ‘sobriety pill’? Each year over three million people die due to alcohol-related causes. To put that in perspective, that’s a whopping 5.9% of all deaths worldwide. Meanwhile, countless others endure the adverse health effects of alcohol use. Unfortunately, current psychological and pharmacological treatments for alcohol-use disorders are only marginally better than placebo in reducing intake. Imagine, then, [...]The post Could research into oxytocin and alcohol lead to a ‘sobriety pill’? appeared first on PsyPost.
Five things that would improve things for people with dementia – and the rest of us too The prime minister’s new challenge on dementia 2020, six years on from the announcement of a national strategy, has some very ambitious goals: to become the country with the best dementia care and the best research into dementia and other neuro-degenerative diseases by 2020. To achieve these goals, the new report outlines 18 priorities including [...]The post Five things that would improve things for people with dementia – and the rest of us too appeared first on PsyPost.
What is it Like to Be in Love? I created this piece in 2004 as part of a heuristic research project in my second year of grad school at Southwestern College in Santa Fe, NM. The objective was to perform this qualitative research study to gain understanding about a topic of our choosing. My research topic was love....
7 Ways Your Relationship Can Change You Who you are is less stable than you think, especially when it comes to the influence of romantic partners.
How to Fall in Love and Uncover Happiness in One of the primary pathways to an enduring happiness is facilitating a sense of connection. When we feel connected we feel balanced, when we feel balanced, we often feel happy. The problem is as we grow up in this world, we have to learn how to shield ourselves from vulnerability...
Hidden gene gives hope for improving brain function The mechanism a novel gene uses to affect brain function and elicit behavior related to neuropsychiatric disease has been identified by an international team of researchers. They discovered that a gene called Gomafu might be key to understanding how our brain rapidly responds to stressful experiences.
New study shows decreased aggressive behavior toward strangers in autism spectrum disorder model Much speculation has occurred in the media over possible heightened aggression in those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. A new study has found no evidence of increased aggressive behavior toward strangers in an animal model of the condition.
Mothers, Daughters and Food It seems especially cruel and strange that mothers often pass down a legacy of self-hatred, guilt and shame to the very children for whom they would otherwise lay down their own lives.