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The End of Stigma Brazil's campaign to tackle mental health discrimination.
ADHD Could Lead to Obesity Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could be at greater risk of becoming obese, a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry shows. “We found that ADHD was a risk factor for later obesity,” said Alina Rodriguez, a visiting professor at Imperial College London,...
How a Suggestion Can Change Your Life We are influenced by all kinds of things. But knowing that, we can use those external influences to shape success.
Setting Healthy Expectations for Your Children One of the challenges of parenting is figuring out when to accept your children as they are, and when to push them to be more.  Here are some guidelines and suggestions for how to begin to set healthy expectations for your kids, and for yourself. 1)  Learn about child development....
Whatever Doesn't Kill You, Will Only Make You Stronger? When bad stuff happens to resilient people, it appears that in the short-term they don’t do anything different from what nonresilient people do. Instead, they feel something different about their ability to handle things. And as a result, they fare better physically and psychologically over the long-term.
Women who sleep more also have more sex Researchers suggest that each additional hour of sleep increases the next day's possibility of sex by more than ten percent.
Happiness Greatest Hits Today is the International Day of Happiness, launched last year by the United Nations to promote subjective well-being as a legitimate goal of public policy and social progress. That’s a goal we share at the Greater Good Science Center, and through the years we’ve covered happiness research from every conceivable angle. Here are some highlights—the most interesting, provocative, or helpful pieces we’ve published on the science of happiness. What is happiness anyway? Many scientists use happiness interchangeably with “subjective well-being,” which they measure by simply asking people to report how satisfied they feel with their own lives and how much positive and negative emotion they’re experiencing. Leading researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky describes happiness more precisely as “the experience of joy, contentment, or positive well-being, combined with a sense that one’s life is good, meaningful, and worthwhile.” Here are some pieces that explore the nuances of happiness. Is a Happy Life Different from a Meaningful One? by Jason Marsh and Jill Suttie Sonja Lyubomirsky on the Myths of Happiness (podcast) The Neuroscience of Happiness: A Q&A with Rick Hanson What are the benefits of happiness? In addition to making us feel good, studies have found that happiness actually improves other aspects of our lives, as well as the lives of the people around us. Is Happiness Good for Your Health? by Caroline Wilmuth
A Reminder for Loving Our Bodies And Ourselves Barbara Abercrombie wrote one of my favorite books called A Year of Writing Dangerously: 365 Days of Inspiration & Encouragement. In it she includes a powerful quote from Richard Rhodes which actually makes the perfect reminder for learning to love our bodies and ourselves. “If writing a book is impossible,...
7 Ways to Break Clutter’s Emotional Grip Except in cases of compulsive hoarding, the word “clutter” is associated more with annoyance than with addiction. Yet as with all dependencies, the piling up of possessions, obligations or worries creates a powerful comfort zone. It also brings pain at any thought of major change. There can be an emotional...
Troops who don't pass the smell test likely have traumatic brain injury Decreased ability to identify specific odors can predict abnormal neuroimaging results in blast-injured troops, according to a new study. The olfactory system processes thousands of different odors, sending signals to the brain which interprets the smell by linking it to a past memory. If memory is impaired, as is the case with Alzheimer's disease, sleep deprivation, and acute traumatic brain injury, the task is not entirely possible.
Glimpse into the regulation of water exchange in the brain The mechanism that regulates the flow of water in brain cells has been discovered by researchers. The human brain is 80 percent water, which makes the constant regulation of the amount of fluid in the brain very important. Disruptions in the regulation of the direction or speed of the water flow are associated with medical conditions, including hydrocephalus ("water in the brain"), for example.
Coping with Comparison Envy “Comparison envy.” For me at least, this is what happens when I start thinking about how I want my life to be different. Then I start thinking about people I know (or don’t know). Then I start assuming their lives are working out in ways mine is not. Then I...
Different Mental Powers Peak At Wildly Different Ages  Brains work quicker at 18, but some mental powers peak surprisingly late. » Continue reading: Different Mental Powers Peak At Wildly Different Ages  » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Painless Brain Stimulation Improves Mental Arithmetic in Five Days The Age At Which You Reach Peak Cognitive Performance Meditation’s Widespread Effect on How The Brain Ages Urban Living: Green Spaces Improve Your Mental Health Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General
Autistic and non-autistic brain differences isolated for first time The functional differences between autistic and non-autistic brains have been isolated for the first time, following the development of a new methodology for analysing MRI scans.
Neuropsychology: Power naps produce a significant improvement in memory performance Psychologists have shown that a short nap lasting about an hour can significantly improve memory performance. The study involved examination of memory recall in 41 participants. The volunteers had to learn single words and word pairs. Once the learning phase was over, the participants were tested to determine how much information they could remember. About half of the participants were then allowed to sleep, while the others watched a DVD. After that, the participants were re-tested and those who had taken a nap were shown to have retained substantially more word pairs in memory than the participants in the control group who had watched a DVD.
10 Things Your Psychology Professors Want You to Know An education in psychology is enormous - including information on such diverse topics ranging from how infants perceive shapes to how rats learn to complete mazes - and more. Way more. The list found here distills a traditional education in psychology to 10 things that psychology professors really want their students to walk away with.
America's aging population will require more neurosurgeons to handle increased brain bleeds By 2030, chronic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) will be the most common adult brain condition requiring neurosurgical intervention in the U.S., according to a new study. And hospitals and neurosurgeons may be under-manned to handle the projected onslaught of patients.
Best of Our Blogs: March 20, 2015 “Oh my God, what if you wake up some day, and you’re 65, or 75, and you never got your memoir or novel written; or you didn’t go swimming in warm pools and oceans all those years because your thighs were jiggly and you had a nice comfortable tummy; or...
ADHD, Easily Distracted I have noticed that I miss things. I’m not oblivious to my obliviousness. That sounds like a paradox, and maybe it is. Heaven knows we have plenty of those, right? But I’ve also observed that it’s the boring things that I manage to miss. Those things that seem so much...
Overcoming Relationship Anxiety and Feeling Good About It Worrying about your relationships all the time and wondering if you are going to be marginalized or rejected is no fun. If you have an anxious attachment style then you know this all to well. The good news is that now you can learn to override your automatic emotional responses and have more positive experiences in relationships.