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Navigating Daily Disappointments Many days I feel disappointed in myself. I’m disappointed I didn’t wake up early. I’m disappointed I missed the morning yoga class. I’m disappointed I didn’t work hard enough. I’m disappointed I’m easily distracted. I’m disappointed I didn’t do the laundry or make the bed or organize that thing I...
Is Your Partner Depressed? A married couple came to psychotherapist Rebecca Nichols, LPC, to improve their communication. The wife was having a hard time concentrating on conversations. In the last few months she’d become increasingly irritable and indecisive. And she constantly snapped at her husband. While the couple’s communication certainly needed work, it turned...
Red vs. Blue: Which Should You Choose? Has anyone ever done research on whether playing on the red team or the blue gives one a mental edge in games? Yep.
Twin study lends new insights into link between back pain and depression Genetic factors help to explain the commonly found association between low back pain and depression, suggests a large study of twins. Genetic factors affecting both conditions may be involved in the association between back pain and depression, according to the report.
Beliefs can regulate effects of nicotine on the human brain Scientists have discovered that beliefs can regulate the effects of nicotine on the human brain. Two identical cigarettes led to a new discovery. Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity. Why the difference? Some subjects were told their cigarettes were nicotine free. This goes beyond he placebo effect, researchers say.
Activate These 5 Fundamentals For Conscious Change Do you believe you can change? These 5 steps are fundamental to positive change....
Optogenetic stimulation of the brain to control pain demonstrated in study New research reveals for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain. Researchers found that by using specific frequency of light to modulate a very small region of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex, or ACC, they could considerably lessen pain in laboratory mice.
My Challenges with Forgiving Others This feels like a weird post to write. I say that because I have only now just realized (at a newly-minted age 44), that the challenge I thought I was having with forgiving others is not the challenge I am actually having. By that I mean – in a way, actions...
Vitamin D Benefits Common Mental Illnesses By Regulating Serotonin Study reveals how vitamin D benefits mental disorders, as do omega-3 fatty acids. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is"Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Autism: Vital Link Found Between Vitamin D and Serotonin Production This Vitamin Stops People Feeling SAD and Promotes Good Mental Health Cooking Fish This Way Protects Brain From Gray Matter Loss With Age 9 Nutrients Which Should Be In Your Diet for Good Mental Health The Effects of Vitamin E on Alzheimer’s and Age-Related Memory Problems
Having a Baby: When You Don't Agree Being on different pages about having children can be a major relationship roadblock. The key is uncovering the problem under the problem -- some likely suspects.
One brain area, two planning strategies Ready to strike, the spear fisherman holds his spear above the water surface. He aims at the fish. But he is misled by the view: Due to the refraction of light on the surface, he does not see the actual location of the fish. How must his brain now plan the arm movement? Do the brain cells (neurons) reflect the position where the fish was spotted, in other words, the visual target? Or do they plan the physical target, which is the actual direction in which the arm and spear should move in order to hit the fish? In new research, investigators tried to answer this question on the different aspects of planning a limb movement.
Rivers of Becoming   Find yourself a river to meditate on. The rest will come. What, no river nearby?! Look inside: it runs right through you. Spend a contemplative moment on the (meta-cognitive) riverbank of Being as you witness the River of Becoming flow on without you. – “The river is everywhere at...
Do Generations Exist? Is it misleading to speak about a self-absorbed “Me Generation” or jaded, cynical GenXers, overeducated and underemployed?
10 Commandments of No-Fault Relationships For many years we’ve had no-fault insurance. Then along came no-fault divorce. What’s next? How about no-fault relationships?  Over the years I’ve noticed that couples who have problems tend to play the blame game. Each blames the other for whatever’s wrong with the relationship. Making it his fault or her...
5 More Tips for Increasing Your Self-Confidence In a previous post, we discussed five tips for increasing your self-confidence. Here are five more. 1. Speak your mind. Being clear about what you want and need makes it much easier to set personal boundaries. Saying “no” sometimes gives the “yes” more meaning. Speaking up and setting boundaries does...
It’s Best to Make Your Own Drugs A significant segment of the population lives with more than one chronic medical condition. The pharmaceutical industry makes drugs for almost every type of chronic condition. However, only a handful of these drugs, such as antibiotics, actually cure disease. Most pharmaceuticals simply control symptoms to varying degrees, and they are...
In Memoriam: Marshall Rosenberg Psychologist Marshall Rosenberg died on Saturday, February 7th. Rosenberg was the creator of Nonviolent Communication and the founder and director of educational services for the Center for Nonviolent Communication. He was 80 years old. Marshall Rosenberg dedicated his life to the study and practice of the conditions that bring about peace. As a consequence, he knew well the critical, sometimes life-saving importance of emotionally-intelligent, awareness-based communication. Dr. Rosenberg drew on his own painful experiences in racially-divided Detroit and his training in psychology to develop Nonviolent Communication, a particular approach to addressing conflict that emphasizes listening with empathy, naming and expressing feelings in responsible ways, and recognizing our common humanity, even in the midst of our most difficult moments together. Since the publication of a slender, easy-to-read book by that name, and through his own tireless presentation schedule each year, tens of thousands of us around the world have trained in the skills of expressing ourselves honestly and receiving one another empathically. We’ve practiced leaning on the four core components of the Nonviolent Communication process: speaking concretely about what we observe; naming the feelings that arise in response; uncovering the needs, values and motivations that underlie our feelings; and asking for what we need to enrich our lives. Those of us who have practiced working with anger through mindfulness and through the specific teachings of this method—stopping and breathing; identifying judgmental thoughts; connecting with one’s needs; and expressing our emotions—know from experience how deeply the practice of mindfulness supports the practice of Nonviolent Communication, and vice versa: how deeply Nonviolent Communication supports the practice of mindfulness. Dr. Rosenberg’s passing is a great loss to those inspired by his embodied, practical approach to peacemaking. And yet his work lives on as an inheritance, one that we may discover, rediscover and invest in ourselves and in one another, sharing these instruments of harmony that were meant to be shared in a diverse, complex, and complicated world.
Am I Delusional ?     Real or Not Real? Some people who struggle with the challenges of bipolar also experience psychosis in the form of delusions.  There might be a feeling, or a sense that, although you feel quite strongly about your belief, things just aren’t feeling like they “add up”. Or you...
Study maps extroversion types in the brain's anatomy Scientists have mapped the similarities and the differences in the brain between the two different kinds of extroverts: 'Agentic' go-getters and 'affiliative' people persons.
How does the human brain tackle problems it did not evolve to solve? Online dating, chatty smartphones, and social media played no role in the evolution of our ancestors, yet humans manage to deal with and even exploit these hallmarks of modern living. In the February 25 issue of the Cell Press journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Dartmouth College researchers review the latest social neuroscience literature and argue [...]The post How does the human brain tackle problems it did not evolve to solve? appeared first on PsyPost.