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Study examines the relationship between materialism and life satisfaction Everyone knows that money can’t buy happiness – but what might make rich people happier is revealed in the current issue of The Journal of Positive Psychology. James A. Roberts of Baylor University and his two colleagues set out to explore the relationship between materialism – making acquisition of material possessions a central focus of [...]The post Study examines the relationship between materialism and life satisfaction appeared first on PsyPost.
Study discovers the upside of boredom Boredom can make us more creative. That is the conclusion of one of the experts interviewed in a feature on the condition by Ella Rhodes in the April issue of The Psychologist. Dr Sandi Mann from the University of Central Lancashire has researched the suppression of emotions, including boredom, at work. In one experiment she [...]The post Study discovers the upside of boredom appeared first on PsyPost.
Many things can be read in a newborn’s gaze, study finds Experienced nannies and doctors have always known how much the visual contact with a newborn can convey. A recent study from the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital provides scientific evidence for this everyday belief. The findings show that a newborn’s ability to fixate relates to the microscopic maturation of brain structures, and it [...]The post Many things can be read in a newborn’s gaze, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Choosing and Doing: Don’t Live by Default “What one does is what counts. Not what one had the intention of doing.” — Pablo Picasso In a world where we have so many options, so many choices, many of us find ourselves not choosing at all. Ironic, isn’t it? Often, we have the intention of doing something important,...
New autism-causing genetic variant identified Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to [...]The post New autism-causing genetic variant identified appeared first on PsyPost.
The 5 Weirdest Psychology Experiments Over the years, psychologists have come up with some ingenious experiments in an effort to study human behavior. Here are some of the oddest psychological studies ever conducted.
Younger motorists and females most likely to use cell phone while driving Eighteen percent of drivers on academic and medical campuses use their cell phones while driving, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. Drivers under 25 years old were 4.12 times more likely to use a cell phone while driving compared to older drivers and [...]The post Younger motorists and females most likely to use cell phone while driving appeared first on PsyPost.
Autistic children more likely to have gastrointestinal issues in early life Scientists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health report that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were two-and-a-half times more likely to have persistent gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms as infants and toddlers than children with typical development. Results are published in JAMA Psychiatry. The study is based on a large longitudinal survey of Norwegian mothers [...]The post Autistic children more likely to have gastrointestinal issues in early life appeared first on PsyPost.
Prenatal exposure to common air pollutants linked to cognitive and behavioral impairment Researchers at the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and colleagues at Columbia University’s Center for Children’s Environmental Health have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control. Their study of 40 children, followed from before [...]The post Prenatal exposure to common air pollutants linked to cognitive and behavioral impairment appeared first on PsyPost.
Perceived open-mindedness explains religion-based dating Across a number of faiths and cultures, people tend to date and marry others who share their religious beliefs. Now, new psychology research from New Zealand’s University of Otago suggests this phenomenon–known as ‘religious homogamy’–is partially a result of inferences about religious people’s personalities. The researchers measured how religious and non-religious individuals perceive the ‘openness’–a [...]The post Perceived open-mindedness explains religion-based dating appeared first on PsyPost.
Education may not improve our life chances of happiness Getting a good education may not improve your life chances of happiness, according to new mental health research from the University of Warwick. In a new study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, researchers from Warwick Medical School examined socioeconomic factors related to high mental wellbeing, such as level of education and personal finances. [...]The post Education may not improve our life chances of happiness appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers help create ‘gold standard’ method for measuring an early sign of Alzheimer’s After six years of painstaking research, a UCLA-led team has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease — the atrophy of the part of the brain known as the hippocampus. The finding marks the final step in an international consortium’s successful effort to develop a unified and [...]The post Researchers help create ‘gold standard’ method for measuring an early sign of Alzheimer’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Narcissistic children: Why some kids think they’re more special than everyone else Narcissistic children feel superior to others, believe they are entitled to privileges and crave admiration from others. When they don’t get the admiration they want, they may lash out aggressively. Why do some children become narcissistic, whereas others develop more modest views of themselves? We have undertaken research into this question and we found socialisation [...]The post Narcissistic children: Why some kids think they’re more special than everyone else appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Spot the Giveaway Girl in You Through my work as a social worker and in recent years as a psychotherapist and counselor, I’ve learned that many of the anxieties and complexities within people’s lives relate to their making decisions based on a codependent way of thinking I call detrimental caretaking (DC for short). Detrimental caretaking leads...
Just slip out the back, Jack: Are humans hardwired to break-up and move on? When it comes to romantic relationships, a research review article suggests humans are wired to break-up and move on. Drawing largely upon the field of evolutionary psychology, they say men and women might break up for different reasons. For instance, a man is more likely to end a relationship because a woman has had a sexual relationship with another man. On the other hand, a woman may be more likely to break up if her partner has been emotionally unfaithful.
23 Ways To Make Life Better 4. Look for the good in yourself. Make this an active process. Try it daily....
Sleep loss tied to emotional reactions A new book summarizes research on the interplay of sleep and various components of emotion and affect that are related to mood disorders, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder and depression.
How is the brain relevant in mental disorder? The Psychologist has a fascinating article on how neuroscience fits in to our understanding of mental illness and what practical benefit brain science has – in lieu of the fact that it currently doesn’t really help us a great deal in the clinic. It is full of useful ways of thinking about how neuroscience fits […]
Why It’s Important to Have Hobbies In this world of constant stimulation it’s worth a moment to stop and do something that you enjoy. So many times we’re so overwhelmed with work and responsibilities that we hardly have time to eat, let alone do something we enjoy. I consider myself blessed because I enjoy writing and...
Carbon nanotube fibers make superior links to brain Carbon nanotube fibers may provide the best way to communicate directly with the brain. The research could enable new strategies for treating neurological disorders like Parkinson's, investigators say.