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Teenager with stroke symptoms actually had Lyme disease A Swiss teenager, recently returned home from a discotheque, came to the emergency department with classic sudden symptoms of stroke, only to be diagnosed with Lyme disease, clinicians report.
Income inequality is taking a toll on the health of American workers “Income inequality” has already become a buzz phrase for the campaigns leading up to the 2016 elections. Likely candidates and pundits on both ends of the political spectrum have begun to talk about how fairness, social justice and — even after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act — the cost of health care insurance [...]The post Income inequality is taking a toll on the health of American workers appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain waves: Basal forebrain neurons fine-tune consciousness by synchronizing rhythms in the cortex Researchers have identified a group of neurons in the basal forebrain that help synchronize activity in the cortex, triggering brain waves that are characteristic of consciousness, perception and attention.
Longer duration of prescribed anti-smoking medication before quitting appears promising Smokers may be more likely to successfully quit their habit if simple adjustments were made to how an existing anti-smoking medication is prescribed, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo research team. Tobacco use is the nation’s leading cause of preventable death, claiming more than 480,000 lives annually; that’s about one in [...]The post Longer duration of prescribed anti-smoking medication before quitting appears promising appeared first on PsyPost.
Why some brain cancers resist treatment Scientists may have discovered why some brain cancer patients develop resistance to standard treatments including radiation and the chemotherapy agent temozolomide.
Despite federal law, some insurance exchange plans offer unequal mental health coverage One-quarter of the health plans being sold on health insurance exchanges set up through the Affordable Care Act offer benefits that appear to violate a federal law requiring equal benefits for general medical and mental health care, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The law – known [...]The post Despite federal law, some insurance exchange plans offer unequal mental health coverage appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Successful cognitive behavioral therapy in youth equals decreased thinking about suicide Penn Medicine researchers found that patients who did not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in childhood had more chronic and enduring patterns of suicidal ideation at 7 to 19 years after treatment. This study adds to the literature that suggests that successful CBT for childhood anxiety confers long-term benefits. The complete study [...]The post Study: Successful cognitive behavioral therapy in youth equals decreased thinking about suicide appeared first on PsyPost.
Double Trouble: Two Bad Habits That Kill Relationships Your feelings are hurt. That’s understandable. What you do at this point could make the difference between resolution and even more hurt feelings. Take the wrong turn and your feelings will continue to be trampled upon. Your relationship will suffer, according to research. Take the right turn and you have...
Focusing on the success of others can make us selfish It is believed that the success of humans as a species depends to a large extent on our ability to cooperate in groups. Much more so than any other ape (or mammal for that matter), people are able to work together and coordinate their actions to produce mutual benefits. But what do we base our [...]The post Focusing on the success of others can make us selfish appeared first on PsyPost.
How men use the word ‘drama’ to win fights against women There are sociological, even biological, differences between how men and women handle conflict.
Too much Facebook leads to depression Constantly checking Facebook to see what your friends are doing could lead to some serious depression.
Before and After: An Obliger Figures Out How To Occasionally, I post an interesting before-and-after story submitted by a reader, about how he or she successfully changed a habit.  I love to hear people’s stories about habit change. We can all learn from each other. If you’d like to share your story, contact me here. This week’s story comes...
The Inverse Innovation Cycle: How Failure Becomes Success It may be true that a checklist will help you reach an opportunity more efficiently.
Empathy for a Child Abuser? Empathy for a child abuser? For a child molester? How can anyone be empathic with someone who has done something so terrible? Why would they want to? Do the perpetrators possibly deserve such a thing? For a judge or prosecutor, of course not. For stopping repetitive dysfunctional family interactions that trigger someone's self-destructive behavior? Necessary.
Parenthood and Resilience Resilience is a crucial but often neglected trait that parents should try to build in their children.
Long Distance Love: Growing Together, Rather than Apart. 1. Do you have any advice for couples looking to ensure they grow together, rather than apart? Connecting with your partner has one variable that is not found in any other relationship, romance. Romance involves the expression of sincere loving feelings and is the fuel that feeds the connection in...
Researchers propose novel new treatment of stroke, other neurological diseases Medicine should reconsider how it treats stroke and other neurological disorders, focusing on the intrinsic abilities of the brain and nervous system to heal themselves rather than the 'modest' benefits of clot-busting drugs and other neuroprotective treatments, experts suggest.
Cerebral blood flow as a possible marker for concussion outcomes Cerebral blood flow recovery in the brain could be a biomarker of outcomes in patients following concussion, a new imaging study suggests. Most of the 3.8 million sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) that occur annually are concussions. Developing methods to diagnose the presence and severity of concussions is imperative, the authors say.
Scientists crack piece of neural code for learning, memory Researchers describe how postmortem brain slices can be 'read' to determine how a rat was trained to behave in response to specific sounds, a new article suggests. The work provides one of the first examples of how specific changes in the activity of individual neurons encode particular acts of learning and memory in the brain.
Low sugar uptake in brain appears to exacerbate Alzheimer's disease A deficiency in the protein responsible for moving glucose across the brain's protective blood-brain barrier appears to intensify the neurodegenerative effects of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new mouse study. The research suggests that targeting the protein called GLUT1 could help prevent or slow the effects of Alzheimer's, especially among those at risk for the disease.