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Best of Our Blogs: April 3, 2015 On good days, illness doesn’t overtake you. You can actually feel the wind of your face and have enough awareness to literally take time and smell the roses. But on … ...
How Avril Lavigne Has Coped with “Depressing” Lyme Disease A few months ago, Avril Lavigne tweeted about a health crisis and left her fans wondering if she was going to be okay. Now, we have an idea of what … ...
The Accidental Self Is who we become in life decided by chance, or by choice? Our genetic composition was determined when our parents (and all prior ancestors) selected mates, but these weren’t our decisions, so our stock of genes is a … ...
Bipolar depression makes me tired When I’m in a depressive state of bipolar, it’s hard. That may be the most obvious statement I could make, especially to someone with bipolar disorder, but that’s what it … ...
Mitochondria are altered in human cell model of Parkinson’s disease Based on research in fruit flies, it has long been suspected that the most common mutation linked to both sporadic and familial Parkinson’s disease (PD) wreaks its havoc by altering the function of mitochondria in neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Using stem cells derived from patients who have PD, scientist at the Buck Institute [...]The post Mitochondria are altered in human cell model of Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Pathway known to suppress tumors may also reduce burden of neurodegenerative diseases A molecular pathway known to suppress tumors appears to also be a major player in clearing cells of damaged proteins implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and certain types of dementia, new research in roundworms and human cells suggests. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers, publishing April 2 in the journal PLOS [...]The post Pathway known to suppress tumors may also reduce burden of neurodegenerative diseases appeared first on PsyPost.
Modular brains help organisms learn new skills without forgetting old skills New research suggests that when brains are organized into modules they are better at learning new information without forgetting old knowledge. The findings — published this week in PLOS Computational Biology – not only shed light on the evolution of intelligence in natural animals, but will also accelerate attempts to create artificial intelligence (AI). Kai Olav [...]The post Modular brains help organisms learn new skills without forgetting old skills appeared first on PsyPost.
Participating in self-injury research doesn’t appear to trigger self-harm, study finds Participating in an online study that includes detailed questions about self-injury does not appear to trigger such behavior, according to a new study published in Clinical Psychological Science. “The results from this study support the notion that research participants are resilient and do not tend to experience distress or adverse reactions to participating in research on sensitive [...]The post Participating in self-injury research doesn’t appear to trigger self-harm, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
One test can predict which kids will become nearsighted A study of 4,500 U.S. children over 20 years has identified a single test that can predict which kids will become nearsighted by the eighth grade: a measure of their current refractive error. The refractive error, or eyeglasses prescription, results from mismatches in the size and optical power of the eye that lead to blurry [...]The post One test can predict which kids will become nearsighted appeared first on PsyPost.
Element of surprise helps babies learn Infants have innate knowledge about the world and when their expectations are defied, they learn best, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found. In a paper to be published April 3 in the journal Science, cognitive psychologists Aimee E. Stahl and Lisa Feigenson demonstrate for the first time that babies learn new things by leveraging the [...]The post Element of surprise helps babies learn appeared first on PsyPost.
The brain-belly connection: Team finds genetic triggers in weight-regulating brain cells The little voice inside your head that tells you to eat, or stop eating, isn’t a little voice – it’s actually a cluster of about 10,000 specialized brain cells. And now, an international team of scientists has found tiny triggers inside those cells that give rise to this “voice”, and keep it speaking throughout life. [...]The post The brain-belly connection: Team finds genetic triggers in weight-regulating brain cells appeared first on PsyPost.
Share Your Experience, Strength & Hope With Your Partner In 12 step recovery circles there is an accepted protocol to how members support each other – especially when they are trying to help a newcomer to the program. Members of the … ...
Additional Visualizations for Appreciating Our Bodies Last week I talked about using visualization to navigate body-hating thoughts. Today, I wanted to share other visualizations to help us appreciate our bodies. You can use these visualizations when … ...
The Choice to Love The Easter season brings together many of my favourite things; family, love and chocolate. As I reflected on this time of year and what  I wanted to share with you, the movie Chocolat came to mind. Aside from highlighting my love of chocolate, it also brought together the single most important aspect of this holiday- […]
7 Warning Signs a Man Is Emotionally Unavailable If he’s doing even ONE of these things, ditch him. Do you have a tragic habit of attracting the wrong kind of men into your life over and over again? … ...
What are Your Priorities? One day, an professor was speaking to a group of business students. As he stood in front of the group of high-powered overachievers he said, “Okay, time for a quiz” … ...
Study finds new genetic clues to pediatric seizure disorders Researchers have identified a new genetic mutation at the heart of a severe and potentially deadly seizure disorder found in infants and young children. The finding, which was reported today in the journal American Journal of Human Genetics, may help scientists unravel the complex biological mechanism behind these diseases. “These findings allow us to open [...]The post Study finds new genetic clues to pediatric seizure disorders appeared first on PsyPost.
Depression and insomnia are strongest risk factors for frequent nightmares A new study suggests that symptoms of depression and insomnia are the strongest predictors of having frequent nightmares. Results show that 3.9 percent of participants reported having frequent nightmares during the previous 30 days, including 4.8 percent of women and 2.9 percent of men. Frequent nightmares were reported by 28.4 percent of participants with severe [...]The post Depression and insomnia are strongest risk factors for frequent nightmares appeared first on PsyPost.
Most antidepressant users have never had depression Depression’s increase in the U.S. has been persisting for years, and it’s going on decades. And while the increase in antidepressant use has followed a predictably similar path, not all cases can be explained by the parallel rise in disease. Many people, in fact, take antidepressants regardless of a diagnosis. A new study published in [...]The post Most antidepressant users have never had depression appeared first on PsyPost.
Natural Remedies for ADHD The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has risen. Combination of behavioral therapy with prescription medication seems to be an effective treatment for ADHD. However, there are also several alternative … ...