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Research Debunks Commonly Held Belief About Narcissism Overuse of “I” and “me” not associated with pathology, study finds
A Heady Issue The announcement that a human head transplant may be as close as 2017 raises many fascinating issues, quite apart from the technical feasibility of the surgical and medical problems inherent in such a procedure. Who are you—your body or your head (with face attached)? Would a brain transplant be less traumatic for families than a head (with brain inside) transplant?
What if my patient is a pilot? The recently Germanwings airplane crash raises critical ethical dilemmas about what health care providers should do if they treat a pilot who has on-going symptoms that could impede flying. Should mental health and other providers violate these patients' confidentiality, and if so, when?
Me Me Me Me Me! Oh, You Are So Wrong About Narcissists To determine whether narcissists really do use more "I-talk" (I, me, my, mine) than everyone else, 9 psychologists from 7 universities analyzed data from more than 4,000 people in 15 samples. They looked at face-to-face introductions and personal essays and Facebook pages and classrooms and small groups. They explain why they did not find what you thought they would.
Do You Really Want to Change that Habit? I often think about this remark by Samuel Johnson: “All severity that does not tend to increase good, or prevent evil, is idle.” - Samuel Johnson, as quoted in James Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson Because I’ve been so focused on habits over the past few … ...
Preliminary study suggests prenatal meditation positively influences infant behaviors Combining meditative practices with pregnancy education could benefit mothers and their infants, but more research is needed. A study published in the Journal of Nursing Education and Practice suggests that prenatal meditation can positively influence fetal health. Chinese researcher Ka Po Chan of the Buddhist Institute of Enlightenment has developed a program for pregnant women [...]The post Preliminary study suggests prenatal meditation positively influences infant behaviors appeared first on PsyPost.
Students drop their stereotypes of science when they ‘Meet the Scientist’ Young people who may have thought that scientists were ‘boring’ and ‘nerdy’ changed their minds after having an opportunity to ‘Meet the Scientist’ face-to-face. That’s one of the key findings of a study published in the International Journal of Science Education by experts from the University of Southampton’s LifeLab project into student-scientist engagement. The ‘Meet [...]The post Students drop their stereotypes of science when they ‘Meet the Scientist’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Using Twitter to probe political polarization We’d like to believe that our opinions are nuanced, balanced, high-minded, wise and above all, unique, but alas they are not — or so says Twitter. Most often, those we engage with on the popular social media site are like-minded, and the ensuing electronic maelstrom of 140-character missives most often serves to reinforce, pulling us [...]The post Using Twitter to probe political polarization appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists find clues into cognitive dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome Scientists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health have identified a unique pattern of immune molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that provides insights into the basis for cognitive dysfunction–frequently described by patients as “brain fog”–as well as new hope for improvements in diagnosis and treatment. In [...]The post Scientists find clues into cognitive dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome appeared first on PsyPost.
Smartphone face recognition ‘improved’ by copying the brain Face recognition security on smartphones can be significantly improved if users store an ‘average’ photo of themselves, according to new research by scientists at the University of York. A research team led by Dr David Robertson, of the Department of Psychology’s FaceVar laboratory at York, found that combining different pictures of the user, rather than [...]The post Smartphone face recognition ‘improved’ by copying the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Online illusion: Unplugged, we really aren’t that smart The Internet brings the world to our fingertips, but it turns out that getting information online also has a startling effect on our brains: We feel a lot smarter than we really are, according to a Yale-led study published March 30 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology. In nine different experiments with more than 1,000 [...]The post Online illusion: Unplugged, we really aren’t that smart appeared first on PsyPost.
The rapid rise of language: Study suggests people quickly started speaking in a now-familiar form At some point, probably 50,000 to 100,000 years ago, humans began talking to one another in a uniquely complex form. It is easy to imagine this epochal change as cavemen grunting, or hunter-gatherers mumbling and pointing. But in a new paper, an MIT linguist contends that human language likely developed quite rapidly into a sophisticated [...]The post The rapid rise of language: Study suggests people quickly started speaking in a now-familiar form appeared first on PsyPost.
New study of freelance workers examines link between their well-being and hours worked A new study of freelance workers has discovered key factors that affect their well-being – either making them happier or increasing anxiety and risking depression. The six-month study to be published in the journal Human Relations was conducted by Professor Stephen Wood from the University of Leicester’s School of Management and George Michaelides from Birkbeck, [...]The post New study of freelance workers examines link between their well-being and hours worked appeared first on PsyPost.
The Thoughts We Carry When I am in stillness feet firmly planted on my mat I try so hard to cover the ground with my hands. But they don’t.   And that’s when the … ...
5 Powerful Ways to Make Depression Work for You Yes, depression feels bad. But below that is an important message you need to hear. When you feel depressed, all you want to do is get rid of the heavy feelings. You want to feel energetic and hopeful again. Of course, you do! Wanting that … ...
The Real Cause of Alzheimer’s Revealed By Thousands of Brains Amyloid proteins may not be the cause of Alzheimer's after all. » Continue reading: The Real Cause of Alzheimer’s Revealed By Thousands of Brains » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:Alzheimer’s Protein Appears At This Incredibly Young Age Consciousness in Vegetative Patients Thought Beyond Hope Revealed by Active Brain Networks How Sleep After Learning Enhances Memory Copper Pinpointed as Main Environmental Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroscientists Improve Cognition in Brains Riddled With Alzheimer’s Toxins
Raised By Parents With Low Emotional Intelligence Ten-year-old Jasmine lies alone on her bed, glad to be sequestered behind the closed doors of her room.  “It could happen,” she whispers quietly to herself. In her mind she’s … ...
8 Signs You're in a Relationship with a Sexual Narcissist Sexual narcissism can be defined as a grandiose sense of one’s sexual prowess which, in the mind of the sexual narcissist, entitles him or her to engage in acts of emotional and physical manipulation at the partner’s expense. How do you know when your partner may be a sexual narcissist? Here are eight telltale signs...
Is Mind Wandering a Good or Bad Thing? Is mind wandering a good thing or bad thing? Is it the same as being on “autopilot,” without being conscious of what you are doing? There seems to be several differing perspectives on these questions.
Depression is Hard Depression is hard, like, really, really hard. For me it is the worst part of being beautifully bipolar. You’ve seen the commercials or read the pamphlets that tell you that … ...