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New study helps explain why spending time on Facebook can make you depressed The social media site, Facebook, can be an effective tool for connecting with new and old friends. However, some users may find themselves spending quite a bit of time viewing Facebook and may inevitably begin comparing what’s happening in their lives to the activities and accomplishments of their friends. According to University of Houston (UH) [...]The post New study helps explain why spending time on Facebook can make you depressed appeared first on PsyPost.
Study reveals Internet-style ‘local area networks’ in cerebral cortex of rats Researchers sketching out a wiring diagram for rat brains — a field known as “connectomics” — have discovered that its structure is organized like the Internet. For years, scientists looking for clues to brain function through its structure focused on what could be seen — the brain’s lobes, grooves and folds. Now, with a more [...]The post Study reveals Internet-style ‘local area networks’ in cerebral cortex of rats appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Near-death brain signaling accelerates demise of the heart What happens in the moments just before death is widely believed to be a slowdown of the body’s systems as the heart stops beating and blood flow ends. But a new laboratory study by the University of Michigan Medical School reveals a storm of brain activity that erupts as the heart deteriorates and plays a [...]The post Study: Near-death brain signaling accelerates demise of the heart appeared first on PsyPost.
Eye-tracking study shows people pay more attention to attractive faces Past research has found that people pay more attention to more attractive faces. However, it is unclear whether highly attractive faces capture people’s attention more quickly, or whether highly attractive faces hold people’s attention longer. To address this, a team of researchers used eye-tracking equipment to observe individuals’ eye movements while looking at highly-attractive and [...]The post Eye-tracking study shows people pay more attention to attractive faces appeared first on PsyPost.
Breastfeeding women and sex: Higher sex drive or relationship management? New mothers in the Philippines spend more time in the bedroom with their partner in the first few weeks after giving birth than they did before they became pregnant. This might be a type of survival strategy to keep the relationships with the fathers of their new babies alive and well, to ensure continued support [...]The post Breastfeeding women and sex: Higher sex drive or relationship management? appeared first on PsyPost.
Failing Our Fathers Many studies of fatherhood leave out nonresidential fathers, particularly those of lower educational and financial backgrounds. A new book by Ronald Mincy and colleagues offers rich insight into the challenges faced by U.S. economically vulnerable nonresidential fathers.
#144 Building Ultimate Family Values IFVP via Compfight Values help us discover and work toward what it is we want out of life. They can guide our behavior at work and help build the kind … ...
Loneliness – The New Smoking?       In two recent surveys, 40 percent of Americans reported being lonely. This despite access to vast networks of “friends” via Facebook.   And this is the paradox: … ...
4 Ways to Rediscover Yourself After an Unhealthy Relationship “I am leaving you for me. Whether I am incomplete or you are incomplete is irrelevant. Relationships can only be built with two wholes. I am leaving you to continue to explore myself: the steep, winding paths in my soul, the red, pulsing chambers of … ...
Stress and obesity: Your family can make your fat Adolescent obesity is a national public health concern and, unchecked, places young people on a trajectory for a variety of health issues as they grow older. A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance (HHP) and Texas Obesity Research Center (TORC) suggests there is a relationship between long-term exposure [...]The post Stress and obesity: Your family can make your fat appeared first on PsyPost.
Stress and obesity: Your family can make you fat Adolescent obesity is a national public health concern and, unchecked, places young people on a trajectory for a variety of health issues as they grow older. A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance (HHP) and Texas Obesity Research Center (TORC) suggests there is a relationship between long-term exposure [...]The post Stress and obesity: Your family can make you fat appeared first on PsyPost.
Computers that mimic the function of the brain Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It’s not a Mac or a PC; it’s the human brain. And scientists [...]The post Computers that mimic the function of the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Extraversion may be less common than we think, study finds Social scientists have long known that, statistically speaking, our friends are more popular than we are. It’s a simple matter of math: Because popular people have more friends, they are disproportionately represented in social networks-which guarantees that on average, our friends have more friends than we do. New research by researchers Daniel C. Feiler and [...]The post Extraversion may be less common than we think, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Characteristic pattern of protein deposits in brains of retired NFL players who suffered concussions A new study takes another step toward the early understanding of a degenerative brain condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, which affects athletes in contact sports who are exposed to repetitive brain injuries. Using a new imaging tool, researchers found a strikingly similar pattern of abnormal protein deposits in the brains of retired NFL players who suffered from concussions.
Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process Why are some people able to master a new skill quickly while others require extra time or practice? That was the question posed by UC Santa Barbara’s Scott Grafton and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University. To find the answer, the team designed a study that measured the connections between different [...]The post Study provides new insight into what occurs in the brain during the learning process appeared first on PsyPost.
Research debunks common narcissism myth: Overuse of ‘I’ and ‘me’ not linked to the disorder Contrary to popular belief, excessive use of first-person singular pronouns such as “I” and “me” does not necessarily indicate a narcissistic tendency, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “There is a widely assumed association between use of first-person singular pronouns, what we call I-talk, and narcissism, among laypeople and scientists despite the [...]The post Research debunks common narcissism myth: Overuse of ‘I’ and ‘me’ not linked to the disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
New blood signature analysis may help diagnose Parkinson’s disease earlier A new blood test may more accurately identify blood signatures, or biomarkers, for Parkinson’s disease (PD), according to a new study published in the journal Movement Disorders. The study, conducted by researchers at Mount Sinai and funded by the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, applies a new approach to looking for blood biomarkers [...]The post New blood signature analysis may help diagnose Parkinson’s disease earlier appeared first on PsyPost.
Cold, callous and untreatable? Not all psychopaths fit the stereotype, says new study Movie villains from Norman Bates to Hannibal Lecter have popularized the notion of the psychopath as cold, cruel, lacking in empathy and beyond the reach of treatment. A new study in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology suggests that this monolithic view, shared by some treatment professionals, is not only wrong but prevents many diagnosed [...]The post Cold, callous and untreatable? Not all psychopaths fit the stereotype, says new study appeared first on PsyPost.
The Coming Climate Disruptions: Are You Hopeful? Hope is such a muddled word: “We must have hope!” “There is light at the end of the tunnel!” Why do climate books and speeches have to end on a note of hope? Re-thinking hope in the face of overwhelming climate changes.
How our emotions transform mundane events into strong memories Human beings are information seekers. We are constantly taking in details – big and small – from our environment. But the majority of the stuff we encounter in a given day we rarely need to remember. For instance, what are the chances that you need to remember where you ate lunch with a friend last [...]The post How our emotions transform mundane events into strong memories appeared first on PsyPost.