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Why Childhood Stress Crimps Academic Performance Animals from an environment full of risk remain vigilant and avoid exploring their surroundings. This promotes survival but has the indirect consequence of reducing their cognitive ability. A similar pattern applies to humans and shows up as academic under performance.
Negative Thoughts and Positive Alternatives Affirmations may sound (and feel) a little stiff and unnatural at first, but don’t worry — they work anyway. Once you get the feel of affirmations, relax and develop your own style. You can begin by spending 15 minutes every day capturing your thought process on paper. Looking at your...
Prevent Dementia: 4 Lifestyle Changes That Double Brain’s Speed These simple lifestyle changes improve reasoning, problem-solving, processing speed and may ultimately prevent dementia. » Continue reading: Prevent Dementia: 4 Lifestyle Changes That Double Brain’s Speed » Read HealthiestBlog.com, the new site from PsyBlog's author Related articles:5 Habits Proven to Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s and Dementia The Vitamin Which May Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s and Dementia How Cynical Personality Traits Affect Dementia Risk 10 Ways to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease You Might Be Surprised How Much 3 Hours of Therapy Can Help Prevent Teen Mental Health Issues
At What Age Is It Hardest to Be Single? Part 1 Recently, a reporter asked me how the experience of living single is different at different ages. Is there a time when it is especially difficult? A time when it is not that difficult at all? I remembered that a few years ago (before I started blogging for Psych Central), I...
Increase Control, Reduce Child Anxiety – A Quick Drawing Having some control over the outcomes of situations in life affects levels of anxiety. For example, if your child has some control over the grade on their next test, this can translate to less anxiety. This might seem obvious, but here’s the thing that’s not apparent… just believing in the ability to...
Ras protein regulates circadian rhythm: Effects on period length, regulation through external time cues Biochemists have gained new insights into the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms. They demonstrated that the Ras protein is important for setting the phase of such a circadian clock, as its activity determines the period length of the rhythm. Ras is also contributing to induce phase-shifts in circadian rhythms in response to external time cues such as light.
Fatal uncoupling in the epileptic brain Epilepsy is a very prevalent neurological disorder. Approximately one-third of patients are resistant to currently available therapies. A team of researchers has discovered a new cause to explain the development of temporal lobe epilepsy: At an early stage, astrocytes are uncoupled from each other. This results in the extracellular accumulation of potassium ions and neurotransmitters, which cause hyperexcitability of the neurons, researchers say.
4 Warning Signs You’re Dating a Narcissist As a child, you probably remember the joyful feeling of receiving a holiday basket, many times (if you celebrated Easter) featuring a giant chocolate bunny, front and center. Large and beautifully wrapped in twinkly tinfoil, it was clearly the highlight of the entire gift. But chances are, once you bit...
The 4th Lie: Do diets make you thinner and healthier?
What Am I Saying About My ADHD You know what? I’ve written 550 posts on this blog. I’ve said a lot of things. Some of them I’ve said tongue in cheek, and some I’ve quoted from other sources. I’ve stated my opinions, but always as opinions. I’ve offered my observations, and encouraged you to share yours. I’m...
Bipolar disorder: an invisible illness The reason you don’t know I’m sick is because I’ve learned to fake it. I’m sure you’ve encountered someone today that you don’t know is ill. People with invisible illnesses don’t usually go around screaming “I have an invisible illness!” or introduce themselves with “It’s nice to meet you. I...
How to Change Your Attachment Style Although in childhood you may have learned habits of insecure attachment, it may be possible for you to override them with effort as an adult.
Mind-Bottling Malarkey, Medicine, or Malpractice? ...72,500 kids three or younger are being drugged for depression. For others several months old to three years of age, more than 4,000 are being given anti-psychotics for bipolar, another 11,000 are being drugged for ADHD, and 509,891 are on anti-anxiety pills. Has the sect of clinicians prescribing these drugs never spent time with an infant or toddler?
Engaging In Family Therapy: Myths and Challenges Family therapy can truly become either a saving grace or a boxing ring. For many of my clients, it’s a boxing ring full of traps, snakes, confusion, and drama. No matter how much I attempt to encourage my young client’s to give it a try and be courageous, the session...
Slowdown of brain’s waste removal system could drive Alzheimer’s Since it was first identified more than a century ago, we still have no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Among the various avenues that researchers have been working on to try and understand the causes and potential treatments for the disease, the role of blood vessels has been increasingly a focus – and in particular the [...]The post Slowdown of brain’s waste removal system could drive Alzheimer’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Socioeconomic status moderates genetic and environmental influences on alcohol use Research on genetic and environmental influences underlying alcohol use has thus far failed to uncover specific causes, likely because genetic and environmental influences vary by context. A study of the moderating effects of socioeconomic status (SES) on genetic and environmental influences on alcohol use has found that genetic effects on amount of alcohol use are [...]The post Socioeconomic status moderates genetic and environmental influences on alcohol use appeared first on PsyPost.
Identifying how drinking contexts and youth characteristics change over time Previous research among young and older adults has suggested that the context in which drinking occurs may contribute to specific alcohol-related problems, such as aggression, risky sex, and drinking and driving. However, little is known about how young drinkers select drinking contexts. A longitudinal study of drinking patterns, and demographic and psychosocial characteristics associated with [...]The post Identifying how drinking contexts and youth characteristics change over time appeared first on PsyPost.
Comparing the diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders in the DSM-5 and ICD-10 Both the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition (ICD-10) have established diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). While the DSM is widely used by clinicians, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently called for [...]The post Comparing the diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders in the DSM-5 and ICD-10 appeared first on PsyPost.
Teaching science to the brain: How we learn the way things work When you learn a new technical concept, something happens in your brain, but exactly what has been a mystery until now. For the first time, Carnegie Mellon University scientists have traced the brain processes that occur during the learning of technical concepts. Published in NeuroImage, the findings reveal how new technical knowledge is built up in [...]The post Teaching science to the brain: How we learn the way things work appeared first on PsyPost.
Teens’ approach to social media risk is different from adults’ For every parent who ever wondered what the heck their teens were thinking when they posted risky information or pictures on social media, a team of Penn State researchers suggests that they were not really thinking at all, or at least were not thinking like most adults do. In a study, the researchers report that [...]The post Teens’ approach to social media risk is different from adults’ appeared first on PsyPost.