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How to get smarter on pills for seniors Open the medicine cabinet of a senior and you’re likely to find scores of pill bottles. Physicians are often unaware of all the medications a patient is taking, which can result in unnecessary additional prescriptions, non-prescription medications and potential drug-drug interactions that cause unexpected adverse effects. When a cancer diagnosis is thrown into the mix, [...]The post How to get smarter on pills for seniors appeared first on PsyPost.
Cerebellar ataxia can’t be cured, but study finds that some cases can be treated No cures are possible for most patients who suffer debilitating movement disorders called cerebellar ataxias. But in a few of these disorders, patients can be effectively treated with regimens such as prescription drugs, high doses of vitamin E and gluten-free diets, according to a review article in the journal Movement Disorders. “Clinicians must become familiar [...]The post Cerebellar ataxia can’t be cured, but study finds that some cases can be treated appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Violence-free’ zones improve behavior and performance in middle and high school students A youth violence-reduction mentoring program for trouble-plagued schools in urban centers has contributed to improved student behavior and performance at high-risk middle and high schools in Wisconsin and Virginia, according to a new Baylor University case study. The “Violence-Free Zone” is the national model of mentoring students in areas with high levels of crime and [...]The post ‘Violence-free’ zones improve behavior and performance in middle and high school students appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Most attractive’ male birds don’t have the best genes: study ‘Attractive’ male birds that mate with many females aren’t passing on the best genes to their offspring, according to new UCL research which found promiscuity in male birds leads to small, genetic faults in the species’ genome. Although minor, these genetic flaws may limit how well future generations can adapt to changing environments. The study, [...]The post ‘Most attractive’ male birds don’t have the best genes: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Mathematical models supports the reigning theory of the genetics of altruism It isn’t that often that a scientific controversy is featured in the New Yorker, but in 2012 an article titled “Kin and Kind” describing a tempest over a biological theory appeared in its pages. The tempest was provoked by an article in the Aug. 26, 2010 issue of Nature. Written by Harvard mathematicians Martin A. [...]The post Mathematical models supports the reigning theory of the genetics of altruism appeared first on PsyPost.
Stress management techniques improve long-term mood and quality of life in breast cancer patients A new study shows that providing women with skills to manage stress early in their breast cancer treatment can improve their mood and quality of life many years later. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that women given the opportunity to learn stress management techniques [...]The post Stress management techniques improve long-term mood and quality of life in breast cancer patients appeared first on PsyPost.
Long-term positive effect of deep brain stimulation on pain in patients with Parkinson’s disease Patients with Parkinson disease who experienced pain before undergoing subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) had that pain improved or eliminated at eight years after surgery, although the majority of patients developed new pain, mostly musculoskeletal, according to an article published online by JAMA Neurology. Pain is a common nonmotor symptom in patients with [...]The post Long-term positive effect of deep brain stimulation on pain in patients with Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Why Do Habits Seem to Make Us Numb? “Hence every thing, that is new, is most affecting, and gives us either more pleasure or pain, than what, strictly speaking, naturally belongs to it. When it often returns upon us, the novelty wears off; the passions subside; the hurry of the spirits is over; and we survey the objects...
Depression or Chronic Shame? When a person has been resistant to every form of depression treatment, is it possible that their illness stems from a different place? In a recent New York Times article Hillary Jacobs Hendel, a psychotherapist, writes about a patient who experienced what she calls “chronic shame.” Hendel’s patient, Brian, had tried every type...
Twins study shows exam success is strongly influenced by DNA In a study of more than 6,500 pairs of twins, researchers from our Department of Education and Kings College London, showed that more than half of the differences between pupils performance at GCSE can be explained by differences in genetics. Genetics and GCSE results The research found that although IQ showed the strongest relationship with exam scores [...]The post Twins study shows exam success is strongly influenced by DNA appeared first on PsyPost.
Research identifies novel steps in dementia progression Research by biologists at the University of York has identified new mechanisms potentially driving progression of an aggressive form of dementia. The research, which was funded by Alzheimer’s Society and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), is published today in The Journal of Cell Biology. Working with scientists at the University of Massachusetts [...]The post Research identifies novel steps in dementia progression appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links exercise to improved erectile and sexual function in men Men who exercise more have better erectile and sexual function, regardless of race, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. While past studies have highlighted the relationship between better erectile function and exercise, African-American men have been underrepresented in this literature. “This study is the first to link the benefits [...]The post Study links exercise to improved erectile and sexual function in men appeared first on PsyPost.
Genome-wide screen of learning in zebrafish identifies enzyme important in neural circuit Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe the first set of genes important in learning in a zebrafish model in the journal Neuron this week. “Using an in-depth analysis of one of these genes, we have already revealed an important relevant signaling pathway,” says senior author Michael Granato, PhD, [...]The post Genome-wide screen of learning in zebrafish identifies enzyme important in neural circuit appeared first on PsyPost.
Research into brain’s ability to heal itself offers hope for novel treatment of brain injury Innovative angles of attack in research that focus on how the human brain protects and repairs itself will help develop treatments for one of the most common, costly, deadly and scientifically frustrating medical conditions worldwide: traumatic brain injury. In an extensive opinion piece recently published online on Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, Henry Ford Hospital [...]The post Research into brain’s ability to heal itself offers hope for novel treatment of brain injury appeared first on PsyPost.
Five Things That Grow Your Mental Toughness   It’s a coveted trait. It’s what coaching gurus promise, athletes embody, and secretly we all want. It’s what separates though who can take a hit and those who will quit. It’s often what divides those who will fight until success is theirs and those who will only hope for...
What are personality disorders and how are they treated? Filmmakers know personality disorders make for compelling viewing. Think of attention-seeking Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind (1939). Or the manipulation and callous disregard for others in Silence of the Lambs (1991), The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) and Chopper (2000). Then there are the fears of abandonment and emotional instability in Fatal Attraction (1987) [...]The post What are personality disorders and how are they treated? appeared first on PsyPost.
Why some people have trouble telling left from right (and why it’s so important) Do you ever have trouble telling right from left? For example you’re taking a driving lesson and the instructor asks you to take a left turn and you pause, struggling to think of which way is left. If so, you’re not on your own – a significant proportion of our population has difficulty in telling [...]The post Why some people have trouble telling left from right (and why it’s so important) appeared first on PsyPost.
Experiment Reveals Simple Secret To Happiness This short video reveals the oh-so-simple thing you can do right now to increase your happiness. You’ll thank me later. You’ll get it in the first 30 seconds. Then, watch the amazing results unfold over the next few minutes. At the end, be prepared for mind-blower! Warm fuzzies? Sure. But...
Cyberbullying: A virtual menace takes its toll on college students It’s easy to think of college as a time for freedom from problems you might have had in high school, like bullying. You might also think that students have become more confident in their identities, so bullying may not be as hurtful. However, new research shows that cyberbullying is becoming a serious problem on college [...]The post Cyberbullying: A virtual menace takes its toll on college students appeared first on PsyPost.
Study may identify new cause of brain bleeds in fetuses, newborns A newly discovered bodily process in mice may explain why some human fetuses who have different antigens than their mothers suffer life-threatening brain bleeds, according to a new study.