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Education may not improve our life chances of happiness Getting a good education may not improve your life chances of happiness, according to new mental health research from the University of Warwick. In a new study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, researchers from Warwick Medical School examined socioeconomic factors related to high mental wellbeing, such as level of education and personal finances. [...]The post Education may not improve our life chances of happiness appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers help create ‘gold standard’ method for measuring an early sign of Alzheimer’s After six years of painstaking research, a UCLA-led team has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease — the atrophy of the part of the brain known as the hippocampus. The finding marks the final step in an international consortium’s successful effort to develop a unified and [...]The post Researchers help create ‘gold standard’ method for measuring an early sign of Alzheimer’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Narcissistic children: Why some kids think they’re more special than everyone else Narcissistic children feel superior to others, believe they are entitled to privileges and crave admiration from others. When they don’t get the admiration they want, they may lash out aggressively. Why do some children become narcissistic, whereas others develop more modest views of themselves? We have undertaken research into this question and we found socialisation [...]The post Narcissistic children: Why some kids think they’re more special than everyone else appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Spot the Giveaway Girl in You Through my work as a social worker and in recent years as a psychotherapist and counselor, I’ve learned that many of the anxieties and complexities within people’s lives relate to their making decisions based on a codependent way of thinking I call detrimental caretaking (DC for short). Detrimental caretaking leads...
Just slip out the back, Jack: Are humans hardwired to break-up and move on? When it comes to romantic relationships, a research review article suggests humans are wired to break-up and move on. Drawing largely upon the field of evolutionary psychology, they say men and women might break up for different reasons. For instance, a man is more likely to end a relationship because a woman has had a sexual relationship with another man. On the other hand, a woman may be more likely to break up if her partner has been emotionally unfaithful.
23 Ways To Make Life Better 4. Look for the good in yourself. Make this an active process. Try it daily....
Sleep loss tied to emotional reactions A new book summarizes research on the interplay of sleep and various components of emotion and affect that are related to mood disorders, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder and depression.
How is the brain relevant in mental disorder? The Psychologist has a fascinating article on how neuroscience fits in to our understanding of mental illness and what practical benefit brain science has – in lieu of the fact that it currently doesn’t really help us a great deal in the clinic. It is full of useful ways of thinking about how neuroscience fits […]
Why It’s Important to Have Hobbies In this world of constant stimulation it’s worth a moment to stop and do something that you enjoy. So many times we’re so overwhelmed with work and responsibilities that we hardly have time to eat, let alone do something we enjoy. I consider myself blessed because I enjoy writing and...
Carbon nanotube fibers make superior links to brain Carbon nanotube fibers may provide the best way to communicate directly with the brain. The research could enable new strategies for treating neurological disorders like Parkinson's, investigators say.
Why drug for type II diabetes makes people fat Medication used to treat patients with type II diabetes activates sensors on brain cells that increase hunger, causing people taking this drug to gain more body fat, according to researchers. The study describes a new way to affect hunger in the brain and helps to explain why people taking a class of drugs for type II diabetes gain more body fat.
Sex in the Head What is sexual desire? Is it raw, animal instinct? Or is it something more mindful?
The Case of Claire Underwood Two weeks ago, I used the character of Frank Underwood as a “case study” to illustrate the misunderstood psychiatric diagnosis of Antisocial Personality Disorder, and many of you asked: Well, what about his wife, Claire?
Unnaturally Good: The Plight of the Goody Two-Shoes There’s authentic virtue, and then there’s a kind of chronic, not-quite-credible virtue that doesn’t—and can’t—reflect the individual’s true nature. Their righteous words and actions, though perceivable as virtuous, may not come from their heart but their head. And what they say may belie what they’re really thinking—may not, in essence, “capture” who they truly are.
Smart Strategies to Detect a Liar Online More than 20 million people visit online dating services every months. But there is a lot of creeps out there. Some online-daters put up photos from 20 years ago. Some lie about their age, their job situation, their marital status, or their personality traits. Given all this uncertainty, how do you best navigate through the jungle of online profiles?
Coffee Shop Culture: A Sense of Community Before “Born To Run” was played at a 1988 concert, Bruce Springsteen was candid with the crowd. He wrote “Born To Run” in his bedroom in Long Branch, New Jersey, when he was 24 years old. “The questions I asked myself in this song, it seems like I’ve been trying to...
Peter Singer Argues for "Effective Altruism" in His New Book Renowned philosopher Peter Singer's new book called "The Most Good You Can Do" is a very thoughtful discussion about charitable giving. Whether you agree or disagree with Professor Singer's arguments I guarantee they will make you think deeply about what you do with your money and if your donations really do the most good you can do. This book also left me hopeful.
Promising new biomarkers for concussion identified A panel of four readily detectable blood proteins can accurately indicate concussion, even helping distinguishing it from other injuries, according to a new study. Researchers found the panel by employing the unusual strategy of looking at the body's inflammatory response to trauma, which might also be a therapeutic target.
Prenatal exposure to common air pollutants linked to cognitive, behavioral impairment A powerful relationship between prenatal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control have been identified by researchers.
Prenatal exposure to common air pollution linked to cognitive, behavioral impairment A powerful relationship between prenatal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control have been identified by researchers. The study showed reductions in nearly the entire white matter surface of the brain's left hemisphere -- loss associated with slower processing of information during intelligence testing and more severe behavioral problems, including ADHD and aggression.