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HIV can spread early, evolve in patients’ brains The AIDS virus can genetically evolve and independently replicate in patients’ brains early in the illness process, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have discovered. An analysis of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), a window into brain chemical activity, revealed that for a subset of patients HIV had started replicating within the brain within [...]The post HIV can spread early, evolve in patients’ brains appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Crossing your fingers can change your perception of pain How you feel pain is affected by where sources of pain are in relation to each other, and so crossing your fingers can change what you feel on a single finger, finds new UCL research. The research, published in Current Biology, used a variation on an established pain experiment, known as the “thermal grill illusion”. [...]The post Study: Crossing your fingers can change your perception of pain appeared first on PsyPost.
Roseroot herb shows promise as potential depression treatment option Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), or roseroot, may be a beneficial treatment option for major depressive disorder (MDD), according to results of a study in the journal Phytomedicine led by Jun J. Mao, MD, MSCE, associate professor of Family Medicine, Community Health and Epidemiology and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine of University of Pennsylvania. The [...]The post Roseroot herb shows promise as potential depression treatment option appeared first on PsyPost.
Study adds evidence on link between PTSD, heart disease In a study of more than 8,000 veterans living in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, those with posttraumatic stress disorder had a nearly 50 percent greater risk of developing heart failure over about a seven-year follow-up period, compared with their non-PTSD peers. The findings appear in the April 2015 issue of the American Journal of [...]The post Study adds evidence on link between PTSD, heart disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Simple ‘index strategy’ helps consumers make choices Say you’re out shopping for basic household goods — perhaps orange juice and soup. Or light bulbs. Or diapers for your young child. How do you choose the products you buy? Is it a complicated decision, or a simple one? It could be complex: Factors like price, quality, and brand loyalty may run through your [...]The post Study: Simple ‘index strategy’ helps consumers make choices appeared first on PsyPost.
Domestic violence victims may be hurt by mandatory arrest laws “Just call the police, they have to do something,” is sometimes the advice given to a woman who reveals that she is a victim of intimate partner violence (IPV), more commonly called domestic violence. The thinking behind the advice is a positive opinion that mandatory arrest — a policy that was created in an effort [...]The post Domestic violence victims may be hurt by mandatory arrest laws appeared first on PsyPost.
Stereotypes lower math performance in women, but effects go unrecognized A new study from Indiana University suggests that gender stereotypes about women’s ability in mathematics negatively impact their performance. And in a significant twist, both men and women wrongly believe those stereotypes will not undermine women’s math performance — but instead motivate them to perform better. The research, led by IU social psychologist Kathryn L. [...]The post Stereotypes lower math performance in women, but effects go unrecognized appeared first on PsyPost.
The Long Term Effects of Heroin Addiction It is increasingly common for people of all walks of life to use heroin. It is no longer just a teenage fad, but a drug which enters workplaces, damages relationships and can do long term harm to a person’s health. You may be able to identify when a person is using heroin, but do you […]
The Healing Power of Awe The mountains. The stars freckled across the sky. A fiery sunrise. A rich cup of coffee alongside a piece of flaky pie: These things are awesome. Though I’ve seen a million sunsets and stared at the oceans for hours, I’m still moved by their wonder and mystery, touched by their...
4 Rules for Apologizing We all mess up. It’s just part of being human and connecting with other humans. So we all need to apologize once in a while. The thing is, a bad apology can be worse than no apology at all. So here are some tips on getting it right—and these also...
On Angel’s Wings: Flight 9525 Today, many of us are just beginning to absorb the unthinkable loss that has happened as a result of the apparent actions of the copilot in command of the German Wings Airbus 320 from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. For reasons we are may never truly understand, it appears this person made...
Is it just me? Perception vs. Reality. Whoever you are, you have an endless supply of potential. No, I’m not just saying words of encouragement, I truly mean it and I will explain why. We are a result of our experiences; fluid, constantly reshaping ourselves and our future, always moving backward and forward. Who we are, the...
Three Reasons to Not (Always) Trust The kind of trust that builds good work relationships has conditions, boundaries, and limits. But, do you know them? Do you understand when not to trust?
A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.
Researchers identify timeline for HIV replication in the brain HIV can begin replicating in the brain as early as four months after initial infection, researchers have discovered. One-third of people not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) to control their HIV will eventually develop HIV-associated dementia. The study's results in these newly infected people stress the importance of routine HIV testing to catch the infection as early as possible to allow the prompt initiation antiretroviral therapy, investigators note.
Who Participates in Dog-sporting Events and Why? Although people can be highly competitive in the various dog-sports, recent research shows that internal motives and social benefits are more important than trophies and accolades.
Crossing fingers can reduce feelings of pain How you feel pain is affected by where sources of pain are in relation to each other, and so crossing your fingers can change what you feel on a single finger, finds new research. "Many people suffer from chronic pain, and the level of pain experienced can be higher than would be expected from actual tissue damage. Our research is basic laboratory science, but it raises the interesting possibility that pain levels could be manipulated by applying additional stimuli, and by moving one part of the body relative to others," the senior author explained.
How the brain 'remembers' pain A mechanism that is responsible for the chronification of pain in the brain has been discovered by researchers, possibly pointing to new strategies for the medical treatment of chronic pain, the investigators say.
Sea slug provides new way of analyzing brain data Scientists say our brains may not be as complicated as we once thought -- and they're using sea slugs to prove it. “This research introduces new methods for pulling apart neural circuits to expose their inner building blocks. Our methods could be used to help understand how brain networks change in disease states and how drugs act to restore normal brain function,” authors say.
Driving is NOT a Social Activity. Look Up and Drive! April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month. You’ve seen it: Drivers sporting earbuds. A pet in the lap. Social media icons flashing on dashboard screens. Beverage cups in one hand; and an ever-present cell phone device in the other in order to dial or send that really-not-that-important text message. Distracted Driving...