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The Neuroscience of Betrayal A betrayal by someone you trust is one of the most challenging interpersonal situations you can face in life. Whether through infidelity or a failure to fulfill a promise, betrayal leads to a desire for revenge, particularly in some people. New neuroscience research suggests who’s most likely to be hurt by a betrayal and why.
Cognitive lives scientific The BBC Radio 4 series The Life Scientific has recently profiled three, count’em, three, cognitive scientists. Because the BBC find the internet confusing I’m just going to link straight to the mp3s to save you scrabbling about on their site. The most recent profile you can grab as an mp3 was artificial intelligence and open […]
Don't Aim for Happiness Loss and melancholy cannot be avoided. Poetry assists acceptance better than manuals of happiness.
Psychology Around the Net: April 25, 2015 This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers how to tell if you’re making a good first impression, how the smell of sweat can help spread happiness (seriously), how your stress can be passed along via DNA, and more. Want to Make a Good Impression? Try … ...
Spike activity 24-04-2015 Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Prospect Magazine has a good article on early psychosis and young people who hear voices. The cost of fame. The Message discusses the nefarious social effects of fame. Neuroskeptic asks Where Are The Big Ideas in Neuroscience? Emotional Intelligence Doesn’t Translate Across Borders. Essential […]
A visual history of madness The Paris Review has an extended and richly illustrated piece by historian Andrew Scull who tracks how madness has been visually depicted through the ages. Scull is probably the most thorough and readable historian of madness since the death of the late, great Roy Porter, and this article is no exception. Modern psychiatry seems determined […]
If you can forgive, it actually makes it easier to forget At some point in our lives, we have all struggled with the wrongs or perceived wrongs that others have done to us. And being unable to forgive someone is not without its costs. The emotional pain associated with such incidents can severely limit our ability to get on with our lives and plan for the [...] The post If you can forgive, it actually makes it easier to forget appeared first on PsyPost.
How I'm Using Science to Help My Daughter Keep Liking Math My 5-year-old daughter loves math and I'm terrified this fall when she starts kindergarten, she could lose that love. Priming studies show that girls are still on the receiving end of negative math stereotypes. But knowing the challenge might also point to a solution. I sure hope so...
Why too much Facebook can leave you feeling down “Comparison is the thief of joy”, said former US president Theodore Roosevelt. Spoken more than a century ago, Roosevelt’s words highlight a fundamental truth that is just as relevant today. In the 1950s, the acclaimed social psychologist, Leon Festinger, devised the social comparison theory to help explain the psychological processes behind why we compare ourselves [...] The post Why too much Facebook can leave you feeling down appeared first on PsyPost.
Mental disorders don’t predict future violence Most psychiatric disorders – including depression — do not predict future violent behavior, according to new Northwestern Medicine longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence. “Our findings are relevant to the recent tragic plane crash in the French Alps. Our findings show that no one could have predicted that [...] The post Mental disorders don’t predict future violence appeared first on PsyPost.
A Healthy Ego To Be Creative How does a healthy self-concept impact our creative work? Don’t we need a big ego, fame and money for creative expression? One sense of this word “ego” is a distorted self-regard, … ...
What’s the optimum amount of homework to set a teenager? Coaxing teenagers to sit down and do their homework is never an easy task. But is it actually worth their while to slave away for hours on end every evening? Not according to a new study of Spanish secondary school students which has concluded that the optimum amount of homework for children is around one [...] The post What’s the optimum amount of homework to set a teenager? appeared first on PsyPost.
A ‘forest instead of the trees’ viewpoint may motivate change after negative feedback Negative feedback can sting, but thinking about the big picture may help transform criticism into positive change, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. “People are defensive when they are told about something they did wrong,” said lead researcher Jennifer Belding, Ph.D., from Ohio State University. “Listening to negative [...] The post A ‘forest instead of the trees’ viewpoint may motivate change after negative feedback appeared first on PsyPost.
New insight into how brain makes memories Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. A team of biologists at Vanderbilt University, headed by Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Donna Webb, studies how these connections are formed at the molecular and cellular level. [...] The post New insight into how brain makes memories appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds that inclusive classrooms don’t necessarily increase friendships for children with disabilities Dropping off a child at kindergarten for the first time can be one of the most memorable yet terrifying experiences of parenthood. Among the many concerns parents face is the worry whether your child will make friends – a key factor, research shows, in reducing anxiety, depression and the likelihood of being bullied. For parents [...] The post Study finds that inclusive classrooms don’t necessarily increase friendships for children with disabilities appeared first on PsyPost.
Orphaned boys as vulnerable to abuse as girls Orphaned children in low- and middle-income countries face a high risk of trauma, with physical and sexual abuse being by far the most prevalent traumatic events. New research shows that orphaned boys in these settings are just as likely to experience abuse as girls. As a result, the study authors suggest targeting more support services [...] The post Orphaned boys as vulnerable to abuse as girls appeared first on PsyPost.
Therapist Blog Challenge #19: Parenting a Special Needs Child... Therapist blog challenge #19 focuses on the experience of parenting a child with special needs. (Note: This is, of course an incredibly broad topic. Subtopics include welcoming a child with special needs into the family, helping siblings of kids with learning disabilities, helping adults with special … ...
7 Signs It’s Time to Consider Couples Counseling Fixing a relationship with therapy doesn’t necessarily mean it’s broken, it’s just maintenance! Maintaining a happy long-term relationship isn’t easy. And when the going gets tough, the tough sometimes need outside help. Couples counseling isn’t a last-ditch effort to save a broken partnership. It’s a … ...
Risk perception: Social exchange can amplify subjective fears The world is a risky place. But our subjective fears and anxieties are often at odds with the evidence. New findings by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the University of Konstanz show that subjective fears about potential risks may be amplified in social exchange. Their findings have now been published [...] The post Risk perception: Social exchange can amplify subjective fears appeared first on PsyPost.
Significant increase in major depression reported during recent recession The recent Great Recession was accompanied by a significant and sustained increase in major depression in U.S. adults, according to a Loyola study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. Prevalence of major depression increased from 2.33 percent during the years 2005-2006 to 3.49 percent in 2009-2010 to 3.79 percent in 2011-2012, according to the study [...] The post Significant increase in major depression reported during recent recession appeared first on PsyPost.