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One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime How does being "plugged in" to an electronic device impact a young child's developing brain?
Finding the body clock's molecular reset button An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities.
How I Forgot My Email Password In A Dream If you think dreams can’t actually hurt you, then this might make you reconsider. Last night, I dreamed that I forgot my password. When I woke up, I had actually forgotten my password....
10 Questions About Psychoanalysis You Have But Are Afraid... There are many myths floating around about psychoanalysis and you may be wondering what is true and what isn’t. Not everyone wants to immerse themselves into the psychoanalytic journey of deeper … ...
Why I Don't Fear Going Solo Some people fear they'll be judged and pitied if they do things alone, but it's also possible people will be impressed.
Is Laser Eye Surgery for You?   When Keith Richards had laser eye surgery done in 2012 he got the attention of many baby boomers who may have thought about the corrective surgery but never pursued … ...
Vice on mental health Somewhat unexpectedly, Vice magazine has just launched a series of articles, videos and interviews on mental health, and it’s really very good. The VICE Guide to Mental Health covers the science of mental illness, what it’s like being sectioned, recovering from suicide or being severely anxious, and the social issues in getting mental health care, […]
Brain balances perception and action when caught in an illusion Two wrongs can make a right, at least in the world of visual perception and motor functioning, according to brain scientists who tracked the eyes of students during exercises in a dark laboratory.
The Secret to Teaching Creativity The secret to teaching creativity is simply to surround students with people who are creating.
Your adolescent brain on alcohol: Changes last into adulthood Repeated alcohol exposure during adolescence results in long-lasting changes in the region of the brain that controls learning and memory, according to a research team that used a rodent model as a surrogate for humans.
The Portrayal of Bipolar Disorder on ABC’s “Secret and... I don’t watch much television. I am more of a music chick. I do watch the show “Secret and Lies” on ABC. The story revolves around a young boy’s murder … ...
Bruce Jenner, You Are Not Alone If you've ever felt like a human being imprisoned in the body of a human doing, say "Aye"
How Affirmations Can Turn the Tables Ever tried psyching yourself up before a job interview so you could bring your best self to the table? Still didn’t get the job? Maybe the emphasis is in the wrong place. Perhaps you started your day like Annette Bening in “American Beauty”: “I will sell this house today. … ...
The Spirit of the Time A thought to consider: “The spirit of this time has condemned us to haste” (CJ Jung).  ...
10 Ways to Stay Connected with Your Adolescent There are affirmative actions parents can take to stay meaningfully and satisfyingly connected to their teenager as the process of adolescence grows them apart, as it is meant to do.
Are You Becoming Your Parents? It’s one of the most subtle, underlying questions that I hear in various forms nearly every day in my office. Some version of, “Am I going to become like my … ...
Want To Be Successful? Learn the Art of Struggle     What do Jay Z, Jaws, and Oprah have in common? There were all born out of struggle. And while it’s easy to pinpoint their success, what we often … ...
Cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to successful brain aging Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure.
'Chemo brain' is real, say researchers Chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to concentrate, research shows. Dubbed 'chemo-brain,' the negative cognitive effects of the cancer treatment have long been suspected, but this study is the first to explain why patients have difficulty paying attention.
Controlling arterial tone and blood flow in the brain Researchers have performed the first human-based study to identify calcium channels in cerebral arteries and determine the distinct role each channel plays in helping control blood flow to the brain.